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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1991
A Soviet Army defector who was once hailed as a hero for escaping from East Germany was convicted Monday of killing a North Hollywood Estonian woman who had befriended him. A San Fernando Superior Court jury, which deliberated four days, must now decide whether to recommend life in prison or death in the gas chamber for Peter Sakarias, 24.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2013 | Steve Chawkins
Interviewers always asked Mikhail Kalashnikov the same question and he always gave the same answer: Yes, he could sleep at night. Quite easily, thank you. Kalashnikov, creator of the AK-47, a cheap, simple, rugged assault rifle that became the weapon of choice for more than 50 standing armies as well as drug lords, street gangs, revolutionaries, terrorists, pirates and thugs the world over, died Monday at a hospital in Izhevsk, the capital of...
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NEWS
July 14, 1989 | From Times wire service s
The former chief of staff of the Soviet Army will testify next week before the House Armed Services Committee, Chairman Les Aspin said today. Marshal Sergey F. Akhromeyev will be questioned July 21 about arms control, the Soviet military budget and military cuts announced by Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the Wisconsin Democrat said in a statement.
OPINION
January 26, 2008
Re "Land mine victim labors to walk again," Jan. 21 It seems only fair that Afghan Mohammed Malek was brought to the United States for medical care, because the land mines that took off his legs were planted by the Soviets in response to policies of our own government. Six months before the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, President Jimmy Carter authorized secret aid to opponents of the pro-Soviet regime in Kabul. The purpose was to provoke an invasion that would tie down the Soviet army.
NEWS
November 18, 1987
Gen. Valery Alexandrovich Belikov, 62, commander in chief of the estimated 400,000 Soviet forces in East Germany. The official East German news agency ADN said Belikov, who had been in command of the largest contingent of Soviet troops outside the Soviet Union, had been named forces commander in August, 1986. He was a member of the Supreme Soviet and a non-voting member of the Communist Party Central Committee.
NEWS
May 25, 1988 | United Press International
The Polish government said Tuesday it has approved a new military oath that removes a reference to allegiance to the Soviet army, wording that has caused scores of draftees to refuse military service. A spokesman for the pacifist movement Freedom and Peace described the change as "remarkable" and a "symbolic victory" for the opposition.
NEWS
February 22, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Polish government spokesman in Warsaw said the Soviet army has banned Polish inspectors from verifying Soviet claims that no chemical weapons are kept on Polish territory. Fifty-thousand Soviet troops are stationed in Poland. Warsaw's dispute with Moscow over pulling out troops grew more tense last week after the Soviet Union said its soldiers could not leave Poland before mid-1994. Poland wants them to go by the end of this year.
NEWS
January 28, 1991 | From Associated Press
A Soviet army captain shot a Lithuanian man at a military checkpoint Sunday, and officials of the breakaway republic said they have begun keeping a record of brutality inflicted on their citizens, a government spokesman said. Government spokesman Audrius Azubalis said a Soviet patrol officer stopped the Lithuanian man and asked him to get out of the car and put his hands on the windshield. A shot fired at the ground by the captain, apparently as a warning, ricocheted and hit the man in the leg.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2000 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wearing rows of aging medals on weary chests, hundreds of old soldiers from the Soviet army marched once more Tuesday--this time to a park in West Hollywood where they celebrated the end of World War II. It was a bittersweet reunion for veterans of the Red army who suffered mightily to beat back Nazi Germany's invasion of the Soviet Union, only to see it replaced with Cold War oppression that drove them from their homeland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1988 | MICHAEL CONNELLY and TRACEY KAPLAN, Times Staff Writers
Two Estonians who deserted from the Soviet army and were welcomed by fellow countrymen in Los Angeles were charged Friday with the murder of a North Hollywood woman, a well-known Estonian activist who had fled her homeland during World War II to escape the Soviets. Peter Sakarias, 21, and Tauno Waidla, 20, were being held without bail in the July 12 murder of Viivi Piirisild, 52, who was found beaten to death with the blunt side of an ax in her home in the 6900 block of Goodland Avenue.
NEWS
September 19, 2004 | Timothy Jacobs, Associated Press Writer
After the ill-tempered guard clanged the cell door shut, the darkness was enveloping and complete. Then lights flashed and a voice barked: "Face the wall! Hands behind your back!" In the room, under pictures of Lenin and Stalin, a stern-faced Soviet army officer sat hunched over a desk, smoking. "What are you doing in a restricted military zone?" he demanded. So began an unusual Latvian exercise in retro-chic: a night in a Soviet-era slammer. Each weekend, about 25 people pay 5 Lats ($9.
WORLD
May 20, 2002 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the latest expansion of the U.S.-led war on terrorism to a little-noticed corner of the globe, about 50 Green Berets landed Sunday in the capital of the Georgian republic to help train its impoverished and ill-equipped army to oppose Chechen guerrilla groups active in part of its territory.
NEWS
February 5, 2001 | Roman Genn
Phoenix Auto Craft & Body in West Hollywood Jan. 31 at 4 p.m. These guys are Russian immigrants and veterans of the Soviet Army.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2000 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wearing rows of aging medals on weary chests, hundreds of old soldiers from the Soviet army marched once more Tuesday--this time to a park in West Hollywood where they celebrated the end of World War II. It was a bittersweet reunion for veterans of the Red army who suffered mightily to beat back Nazi Germany's invasion of the Soviet Union, only to see it replaced with Cold War oppression that drove them from their homeland.
SPORTS
November 10, 1995 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the Vancouver Canucks acquired Alexander Mogilny from the Buffalo Sabres in July, taking on his $3.7-million salary and his complex personality, they deemed it a fair price for the fireworks he would ignite playing on the same team--or even the same line--with Pavel Bure once again. They were sensational in leading the Soviet Union to the gold medal at the 1989 world junior championships, establishing themselves and center Sergei Fedorov as the next cogs in the great Soviet hockey machine.
NEWS
October 8, 1995 | ARTHUR ALLEN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Hundreds of thousands of bureaucrats, diplomats and lobbyists will swell Berlin in the next decade as the once-divided city becomes the seat of Germany's government at the heart of Europe. But where are they going to live? Aiming to protect the woods, lakes and meadows around the capital, German planners have hit on a solution that's friendly to the environment and, potentially, to American businesses: Put some of the people on former Soviet Red Army bases--in American-style houses. Thomas G.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1986 | M. NAZIF SHAHRANI, M. Nazif Shahrani, an assistant professor of anthropology at UCLA, is co-editor of "Revolutions and Rebellions in Afghanistan: Anthropological Perspectives" (Institute of International Studies, UC Berkeley.)
Babrak Karmal has stepped down--or has been pushed out--as head of the Marxist government of Afghanistan, and the seventh round of preliminary talks to end Afghanistan's war are under way in Geneva. A "breakthrough" is now hinted, but eight years after the Soviet-inspired coup, Moscow's agenda remains the same: recognition of the regime in Kabul, no matter who is in the role of chief puppet. In an effort to resolve the conflict peacefully, U.N.
SPORTS
November 10, 1995 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the Vancouver Canucks acquired Alexander Mogilny from the Buffalo Sabres in July, taking on his $3.7-million salary and his complex personality, they deemed it a fair price for the fireworks he would ignite playing on the same team--or even the same line--with Pavel Bure once again. They were sensational in leading the Soviet Union to the gold medal at the 1989 world junior championships, establishing themselves and center Sergei Fedorov as the next cogs in the great Soviet hockey machine.
NEWS
March 20, 1995 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Pandemonium is not a word usually associated with the somber, scholarly field of art history. But imagine suddenly coming upon a world-renowned masterpiece that, by all accounts, had been destroyed during the brutal chaos of war. Now multiply that impassioned reaction a couple of dozen times. You'll have some idea of what's about to erupt in Russia. St. Petersburg's State Hermitage Museum will open an exhibition next week that has the art world holding its breath--and the worlds of international law and politics up in arms.
OPINION
January 15, 1995 | Steven Merritt Miner, Steven Merritt Miner, a professor of Russian history at Ohio University, is a contributor to "The Diplomats," edited by Gordon Craig and F .L. Loewenheim (Princeton University.) He is also working on a book, "Selling Stalin," about Soviet propaganda
During the mid-19th Century, the Caucasus became known as the "graveyard of the Russian Army." The Russian conquest of this wild, mountainous region and its fierce tribes required decades to accomplish and cost the czar's legions thousands of lives. Several of Russia's great authors, notably Mikhail Y. Lermontov and Leo Tolstoy, fought as soldiers in these brutal and protracted campaigns of conquest and cut their teeth on tales of the exotic Southern mountains.
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