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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1990
It looks like Gorbachev is really going to ask Russian consumers to bite the bullet this time. Fortunately, this is the one commodity that country is well supplied with. WILLIAM E. QUADE Van Nuys
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2010 | By Thane Rosenbaum, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When They Come for Us, We'll Be Gone The Epic Struggle to Save Soviet Jewry Gal Beckerman Houghton Mifflin Harcourt: 598 pp., $30 If you think the Cold War is dead as the backdrop for any decent espionage story, you haven't read "When They Come for Us, We'll Be Gone: The Epic Struggle to Save Soviet Jewry," journalist Gal Beckerman's reheating of the politics of the Cold War and of how the millions of Russian Jews and the Americans...
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BUSINESS
August 25, 1987 | DON R. CONLAN, Don R. Conlan is president of Capital Strategy Research Inc. in Los Angeles. He was chief economist for the Cost of Living Council during the Nixon Administration.
A goggle-eyed tourist on his first trip to the Soviet Union has no business posing as an instant expert. Nevertheless, I simply couldn't restrain myself from making a few amateurish observations on an intriguing society and economy. Arriving in Moscow just before sunset, I walked for several hours around the Kremlin and in Red Square. I gradually became aware that, save for the occasional street lamp, there are no lights in Moscow, no neon signs, no advertisements, nothing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jeremy R. Azrael, 73, a leading expert on the Soviet economy and longtime political scientist at Rand Corp., died March 19 at his home in Sherman Oaks, the Santa Monica-based think tank reported. He had been battling lymphoma. Azrael was best known for establishing and leading a semiannual economic forum after the collapse of the Soviet Union. The meetings, held in New York and Moscow, brought together leading Russian, European and American executives and political leaders. "His knowledge of Russia was profound," said Arnold Horelick, founding director of the Rand Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
NEWS
April 6, 1991
Soviet consumers awoke to a costly nightmare this week, finding that, in their strict, government-controlled economy, an array of food and other goods suddenly had increased in price by more than 200%. The Soviet government followed this economic move with a sharp devaluation of the ruble. What's behind these dramatic changes? Here's a brief look: The Road to Ruine The Soviet economy is disintegrating so rapidly its difficulties are multiplying faster than they can be diagnosed, let alone fixed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1989 | DMITRI N. SHALIN, Dmitri N. Shalin is an associate professor in the sociology department of Southern Illinois University at Carbondale.
The miners' strike that began in Siberia's Kuznets Basin before spreading this week to the Ukraine is by far the biggest in recent Soviet history. But it is hardly an isolated incident. In recent months, labor problems have sprung up in Leningrad, Eisk, Klaipeda, Vorkuta and dozens of other Soviet cities. Nor is the unrest confined to urban areas. Besides the coalfields of Siberia and the Ukraine, strikes have also been reported on collective farms throughout the Soviet Union.
NEWS
March 17, 1989 | From Times wire service s
Former Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger warned businessmen today against investing in the Soviet Union, saying the country is suffering an economic crisis. Kissinger also told a symposium on the Soviet Union that the West should maintain its military guard in case current economic reforms fail and Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev is ousted from office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
Abraham S. Becker, a Rand Corp. economist who advised the CIA on military spending in the former Soviet Union and was known for his thorough understanding of the complexities of the Soviet economy during the Cold War, died of leukemia July 5 in Los Angeles. He was 76. He was best known for his work suggesting that the Soviet Union's hefty military spending would lead to its eventual downfall.
NEWS
October 29, 1989 | From Reuters
The Soviet economy, hit by strikes, ethnic conflicts and high wage hikes, has worsened since July, according to official statistics published Saturday. The figures, released by the Tass news agency, appear to confirm public frustration with the persistent failure of President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's perestroika program of economic restructuring to improve the standard of living.
NEWS
December 14, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Nikolai I. Ryzhkov, attempting to pull the Soviet Union out of its deepening economic crisis, asked the Soviet Congress on Wednesday to approve tough measures tightening government control of the economy for the next three years before gradually loosening them in a period of renewed reform and liberalization.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Nikolai Baibakov, who was Josef Stalin's oil commissar and later guided the Soviet Union's planned economy for two decades, has died. He was 97. Baibakov, believed to have been the last living commissar to serve under Stalin, died of pneumonia Monday in Moscow, Russia's gas monopoly Gazprom said. He also was thought to have been one of the last surviving witnesses of Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev's historic "secret speech" denouncing Stalin at the 1956 Soviet Communist Party congress.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
Abraham S. Becker, a Rand Corp. economist who advised the CIA on military spending in the former Soviet Union and was known for his thorough understanding of the complexities of the Soviet economy during the Cold War, died of leukemia July 5 in Los Angeles. He was 76. He was best known for his work suggesting that the Soviet Union's hefty military spending would lead to its eventual downfall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Abram Bergson, 89, a Harvard economist and government consultant whose research helped shed light on the obscure workings of the Soviet economy, died April 23. He wrote an article while still an undergraduate that would become the basis for an important function for measuring social welfare.
NEWS
October 30, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The capitalist world offered sympathy, advice and a little more money Thursday to the beleaguered republics of the former Soviet Union, which have lost about a quarter or more of their economic output since the fall of communism. "It is important . . . for us to acknowledge the hardships which the process of economic reforms is bringing to the people of the former Soviet Union," Acting Secretary of State Lawrence S.
NEWS
July 20, 1992 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Numbly, Uldis Kalnietis stared out of the helicopter at the smoldering remains of Latvia's most prized national treasure, the vast Sliteres wilderness reservation along the Baltic seacoast. Voracious 12-foot flames had blazed through the pristine reservation, devouring about 300,000 trees, charring almost 4,000 acres of rich peat bog and driving out the scores of species that had lived in the carefully preserved park.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1992
General Motors is negotiating to build autos in Poland (no jobs here); Johnson's Wax is planning to make products in the Soviet Union (no jobs here); Wilshire Associates is organizing a government-insured fund to invest in the Soviet economy (no jobs here), "This Is No Time to Be Looking Back" (Dec. 4). We already suffer from the building of U.S.-owned plants overseas and overseas buying of parts--from aerospace to widgets--by U.S. companies The profits from overseas manufacturing and investing may be good for corporations and stockholders, but how do these expand our economy and job opportunities?
NEWS
November 24, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is a popular new diet in the Soviet Union this winter, but it's not likely to catch on elsewhere: a loaf of bread three times a day, supplemented by two pounds of potatoes. "On our income, that's all we can afford to buy," said Yakov Shvolansky, a 72-year-old retiree, as fellow pensioners nodded in solemn agreement. "Meat? I haven't tasted meat in a year."
NEWS
November 6, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration plans to encourage U.S. companies to invest millions of dollars of their money and some of their best technology in the Soviet defense industry--to help convert it to civilian production and private enterprise. Donald J. Atwood, deputy U.S.
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