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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1989
Now that the Soviet Union has finally held its first free elections in history, and Nicaragua has apparently agreed to hold elections later this year, what is the United States going to use as justification for its obscenely swollen defense budget? Well, not to fear . . . I'm sure our leaders will come up with some high-minded justification. Or rather, their campaign contributors will. ALAN FENSTER Santa Monica
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NEWS
July 12, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Voters in Ukraine and Belarus, whose leaders conspired to break up the Soviet Union 2 1/2 years ago, have elected presidents favoring closer ties with Russia, official returns showed Monday. The turnabout is expected to give Moscow greater sway over its old empire.
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SPORTS
May 19, 1989 | From Times wire service s
An Olympic weightlifting champion won a seat in the new Soviet parliament today as Moscow finished choosing its more than 20 deputies just a week before the first session. Weightlifter Yuri Vlasov, who won a gold medal in the super heavyweight class in the 1960 games in Rome, won a run-off election with Viktor Shinkaretsky in Moscow's Lyublinsky district with 66.75% of the vote, according to statistics published by the official daily Vechernyaya Moskva.
NEWS
October 18, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Estonians voted in the Baltic state's first free post-Soviet local government elections, but the large Russian-speaking minority complained that they had been excluded from running. All people who have lived in Estonia for five years have voting rights, but only Estonian citizens can run for office. Russian speakers, who account for about 600,000 of the 1.6 million population, have complained that the republic's "law on aliens" is discriminatory.
NEWS
March 23, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Years' worth of pent-up political frustration are pouring forth in the Soviet Union's current parliamentary elections as candidates and their supporters scramble for their first real chance at power in decades.
NEWS
March 11, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
As deputy chairman of the Soviet State Construction Committee, Boris N. Yeltsin oversees an army of almost 12 million workers who last year put up about $328 billion worth of factories, stores, offices, housing and other buildings across the country. He has a large paneled office in central Moscow. Special telephone lines connect him with the Council of Ministers in the Kremlin and the Communist Party's Central Committee headquarters.
NEWS
March 26, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Campaigning for the first contested national elections since the earliest years of the Soviet state ended here Saturday with an emotional rally for Boris N. Yeltsin, the radical populist whose anti-Establishment candidacy has symbolized the new willingness to break with political patterns.
NEWS
March 19, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
In the most fiercely fought contests of the Soviet Union's current parliamentary election campaign, candidates of a strongly nationalist movement appear likely to defeat the official Communist Party slate here in the Baltic republic of Lithuania. The Lithuanian Reform Movement is predicting that its candidates will win at least 30 of the 42 seats at stake here in the elections next Sunday for the Soviet Union's new Congress of People's Deputies.
NEWS
April 26, 1993 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Russian man, convinced that authorities at polling station No. 19 were trying to sabotage Sunday's referendum results to hurt President Boris N. Yeltsin, organized his fellow voters and blocked voting for two hours in protest. The confusion was caused by an erroneous statement on TV by the chairman of the Central Election Commission that ballots would be valid only if they bore two official signatures and a seal.
NEWS
March 6, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pro-reform candidates, including radical populist Boris N. Yeltsin and several former political prisoners, won strong backing from voters in the Soviet Union's regional and local elections, according to preliminary results released Monday.
NEWS
February 25, 1990 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like the other republics of the Soviet Union, Moldavia on Friday marked Armed Forces Day as it has in the past, with quiet reminiscences of fallen soldiers and red roses left on massive military graves. But here in the capital of the Moldavian republic, there was an unprecedented twist to the observances. Several hundred people carrying the blue, yellow and red flag of ancient Moldavia demonstrated in front of a government office building and a red granite statue of V. I.
NEWS
February 24, 1990 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A visitor doesn't have to go any farther than the Central Square in front of Communist Party headquarters here in the Lithuanian capital to grasp the significance of today's republic-wide elections. Twin signs in the national colors of red, yellow and green--one in Russian, one in Lithuanian--proclaim, "A Lithuania without sovereignty is a Lithuania without a future."
NEWS
May 26, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Mikhail S. Gorbachev, general secretary of the Soviet Communist Party, was elected overwhelmingly Thursday at the first meeting of the Soviet Union's new congress to fill the country's strengthened executive presidency. Gorbachev immediately pledged to use his increased powers to accelerate the pace of his political and economic reforms and to broaden their scope. His election by the first democratically elected Soviet legislature in 70 years gives Gorbachev, 58, broad executive authority to shape the nation's foreign and domestic policies and makes him the leader of the new congress as well.
SPORTS
May 19, 1989 | From Times wire service s
An Olympic weightlifting champion won a seat in the new Soviet parliament today as Moscow finished choosing its more than 20 deputies just a week before the first session. Weightlifter Yuri Vlasov, who won a gold medal in the super heavyweight class in the 1960 games in Rome, won a run-off election with Viktor Shinkaretsky in Moscow's Lyublinsky district with 66.75% of the vote, according to statistics published by the official daily Vechernyaya Moskva.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1989
The recent election of the Soviet Congress of Deputies has generated some of the most starry-eyed Western political commentary since the portrayal of Yuri Andropov as a jazz-loving closet liberal. Although the election does represent a departure from the previous status quo, we should not allow it to distract us from the important continuities in the Soviet political situation. The election did not alter the fundamental fact that Soviet political events reflect primarily the interests and desires of the ruling elite.
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