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NEWS
December 31, 1991
The collapse of the Soviet Union marks the end of an epoch, and the consequences will touch almost everyone. A special edition of World Report sifts through the ashes of the Soviet empire.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2011 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
The cars were clunkers as soon as they rolled off the assembly line. Soviet-made clothes, food and entertainment were equally shabby. Moscow was hemorrhaging its worthless rubles in an arms race with Washington, and Soviet mothers were angry that their sons were dying in a senseless war in Afghanistan. When Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev came to power in 1985 and launched his campaign for perestroika — Russian for "reconstruction" — he gambled that taking an honest look at the country's problems and urging citizens to speak truth to power would steer the Soviet Union off its collision course with economic collapse.
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OPINION
December 31, 1989 | Thomas Powers, Thomas Powers is a contributing editor to Opinion. His most recent book is a collection of essays, "Thinking About the Next War" (Knopf).
Easily said, still hard to believe: The Soviet empire came to an end in 1989. History never came wrapped in a neater package. In 1980, the will of the people found voice in the shipyards of Gdansk, Poland. Outlawed and driven underground, the movement only gathered strength. Last year, it stepped into the void left by the Polish Communist Party.
TRAVEL
March 27, 2011 | By Molly Selvin, Special to the Los Angeles Times
To be honest, I was less enthusiastic than my husband about tacking a jaunt to Kiev onto our already packed 18-day European vacation last summer. But David is a serious amateur historian of World War II and the Soviet Union, a man who has not met a 500-page tome on Joseph Stalin or the Eastern Front campaign that he hasn't devoured. So the invitation from friends spending a year in the Ukrainian capital on a Fulbright Fellowship was irresistible to him, a chance to see firsthand what remains of the Soviet empire as well as the emergence of one of its former satellites.
BOOKS
January 26, 1997 | ANDREW NAGORSKI, Andrew Nagorski, Newsweek's Berlin bureau chief, was based previously in Moscow and Warsaw. He is the author of "Reluctant Farewell" (Henry Holt) and "The Birth of Freedom" (Simon & Schuster)
First, a small confession: I opened "Down With Big Brother" with considerable trepidation. After all, even aficionados of the Cold War may entertain doubts about how much more there is to say about the fall of the Soviet empire.
OPINION
September 13, 2009 | Michael Meyer, Michael Meyer, Newsweek's bureau chief for Germany and Eastern Europe in 1989, is the author of "The Year That Changed the World."
Twenty years ago, on Sept. 11, 1989, the plug was pulled on the bathtub of Soviet empire. At the stroke of midnight, tiny communist Hungary threw open the gates to freedom and the West. Tens of thousands of people surged across the suddenly unguarded border. Scenes of jubilation, of families reunited after decades of captivity in Eastern Europe, flashed around the world. Newsweek's cover dubbed it the "Great Escape." From one day to the next, Americans awoke to a startling new reality.
OPINION
December 17, 1989
Before we begin to make the deep military budget cuts presently being proposed by Secretary of Defense Dick Cheney, let us wait for the Soviets to turn their talk and promises of peace and disarmament into reality. It would be foolish for us to cut our defenses during this delicate time in Eastern Europe. Both World War I and World War II started from the collapse of powerful empires: We may now be witnessing the collapse of the Soviet empire. Consequently, I believe we should be cautious and avoid the discredited McGovernite policy of unilateral disarmament.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1990
Every day we are bombarded by the media with more and more news of events occurring in the Soviet Union and are told how quickly the Soviets are "democratizing." I hope that as democracy is phased in, the structure of the Soviet Union is phased out because the two cannot exist together. If you have democracy, you cannot have a Soviet empire because the two are a contradiction in terms and meaning. This is especially important in view of how many people were destroyed during and after the formation of the Soviet Union.
NEWS
January 25, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hard-line voices in Tehran on Wednesday notched up their criticism of the Soviet military crackdown in Azerbaijan, the Muslim-dominated republic on Iran's northern border. The morning after an open letter by members of the Iranian Parliament demanded that Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev "deal with the Muslims of the Soviet Union with compassion," an editorial in the daily Kayhan International condemned Moscow's handling of the unrest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1995
Re "New B-2 Bomber Funds Give Lift to Southland," Dec. 2: Why not call it what it is? Nearly half a billion dollars for more B-2 bombers in 1996 and another $15 billion likely down the line add up to a gigantic federal welfare program. The beneficiaries--people who usually want the government to get off their backs. So the Antelope Valley will prosper, 25,000 people will keep their jobs and Northrop will profit--all at the expense of the nation's taxpayers who will foot the bill for a still-unproven aircraft designed to fight the evil Soviet empire (now collapsed, remember?
OPINION
September 13, 2009 | Michael Meyer, Michael Meyer, Newsweek's bureau chief for Germany and Eastern Europe in 1989, is the author of "The Year That Changed the World."
Twenty years ago, on Sept. 11, 1989, the plug was pulled on the bathtub of Soviet empire. At the stroke of midnight, tiny communist Hungary threw open the gates to freedom and the West. Tens of thousands of people surged across the suddenly unguarded border. Scenes of jubilation, of families reunited after decades of captivity in Eastern Europe, flashed around the world. Newsweek's cover dubbed it the "Great Escape." From one day to the next, Americans awoke to a startling new reality.
OPINION
November 7, 2004 | Dinesh D'Souza, Dinesh D'Souza, a Hoover Institution fellow, is author of "Ronald Reagan: How an Ordinary Man Became an Extraordinary Leader" (the Free Press, 1997). Website: dineshdsouza .com
As we celebrate the 15th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall on Tuesday, it's worth asking how and why did the wall come tumbling down? I argue that it was Ronald Reagan's statesmanship that brought it down and hastened the collapse of the Soviet empire. Reagan didn't do it alone, but without him it probably wouldn't have happened.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1998
Re Kevin Phillips' "The Menace of Religious Zealotry," Opinion, May 10: The implication is that there is some sort of worldwide Muslim conspiracy, aided and abetted by Chinese forces. It's worth noting that, as official atheists, the Chinese are the enemies of Islam, just as the Soviet Union was. True believers will understand this. Meddling and troublemaking may be useful for China and achieve the short-term aims of some radical Islamic groups. Nevertheless, the Chinese are not the long-term allies of Islamic fundamentalism.
BOOKS
January 26, 1997 | ANDREW NAGORSKI, Andrew Nagorski, Newsweek's Berlin bureau chief, was based previously in Moscow and Warsaw. He is the author of "Reluctant Farewell" (Henry Holt) and "The Birth of Freedom" (Simon & Schuster)
First, a small confession: I opened "Down With Big Brother" with considerable trepidation. After all, even aficionados of the Cold War may entertain doubts about how much more there is to say about the fall of the Soviet empire.
NEWS
January 20, 1996 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Donning the mantle of regional leader again after a series of illnesses, President Boris N. Yeltsin won pledges from Russia's neighbors Friday to make common cause against terrorism and announced steps to end three armed conflicts in its former empire.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1995
Re "New B-2 Bomber Funds Give Lift to Southland," Dec. 2: Why not call it what it is? Nearly half a billion dollars for more B-2 bombers in 1996 and another $15 billion likely down the line add up to a gigantic federal welfare program. The beneficiaries--people who usually want the government to get off their backs. So the Antelope Valley will prosper, 25,000 people will keep their jobs and Northrop will profit--all at the expense of the nation's taxpayers who will foot the bill for a still-unproven aircraft designed to fight the evil Soviet empire (now collapsed, remember?
MAGAZINE
March 12, 1989
So the Hollywood "brat pack" has taken it upon itself to show Americans that the Soviet "people aren't ogres but 'just like us' " ("The Brat Pack's Moscow Mission," by Ronald Brownstein, Jan. 22). This truth has provided the moral foundation for the policies of the Cold War. For if Russians and other subjects of the Soviet empire are just as human as we are, how can any decent human being tolerate a government that denies him the right to select his leaders, to express ideas freely, to hear diverse points of view, to practice religion and to emigrate?
OPINION
May 27, 1990
Mikhail Gorbachev is struggling to maintain the geographic coherence of the Soviet empire. He may succeed for now in suppressing nationalist independence movements, as the czars and commissars before him brutally succeeded, but ultimately the tide of history seems to be running against him. The end of this decade will likely see a Soviet Union that is reduced in size but, conceivably, one that is economically and politically stronger for having undergone amputation.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1992 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Voice of America delivered its first broadcast to Nazi Germany in 1942, the news was dramatically delivered by professional radio actors, led by the U.S. government-run agency's director, John Houseman. The international broadcasting agency that celebrates its 50th anniversary today is now heard around the world in 47 languages by an estimated 127 million people, and its reports are presented in the straightforward, balanced style typical of American news broadcasts.
NEWS
December 31, 1991
The collapse of the Soviet Union marks the end of an epoch, and the consequences will touch almost everyone. A special edition of World Report sifts through the ashes of the Soviet empire.
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