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Soviet Foreign Minister

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NEWS
February 19, 1989 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze made a surprise addition to his Middle East schedule by inviting Israel's foreign minister, Moshe Arens, to meet with him in Cairo on Wednesday, Israeli officials announced Saturday night. The meeting will be the second in a month between the two foreign ministers and reflects the steady thaw in Soviet-Israeli relations as well as the notable re-entry of Moscow into wide-ranging Middle East diplomacy.
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WORLD
November 24, 2003 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
He was jeered in his own country as he ignominiously resigned from office Sunday, portrayed as an aging politician who got stuck in the same swamp of corruption, ethnic conflict and poverty that has beset so many of the former Soviet republics. But barely a decade earlier, Georgian President Eduard A. Shevardnadze had taken on formidable foes to help open the door for the Soviet Union's historic rapprochement with the West.
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NEWS
January 16, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alexander A. Bessmertnykh, Soviet ambassador to the United States, was appointed foreign minister Tuesday, sending a clear signal that President Mikhail S. Gorbachev will continue his "new thinking" foreign policy, which thawed the Cold War's icy relations with the West. Bessmertnykh, 57, succeeds Eduard A. Shevardnadze, foreign minister for the last five years, who resigned last month to protest what he called the country's "slide to dictatorship" and the rise of "reactionary forces" here.
NEWS
February 16, 1998 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six days after an assassination attempt against Eduard A. Shevardnadze, president of Georgia since 1992 and Soviet foreign minister during the glasnost of the 1980s, investigators in his native republic announced Sunday that they had arrested "four or five" suspects and were hunting for two others. Shevardnadze's motorcade was attacked last Monday night in the heart of his picturesque, red-roofed capital, Tbilisi, by a group of 10 to 15 men armed with guns and grenade launchers.
OPINION
March 31, 1991 | Michael Parks, Michael Parks is Moscow bureau chief for The Times
According to Soviet political tradition, retired politicians become nonpersons. Once they leave office, they disappear. If they leave with honor, their names go into history books. They do not, however, speak out on current affairs. But Eduard A. Shevardnadze, the former Soviet foreign minister, has no plans, at age 63, to drift quietly into such obscurity. The suave, silver-haired Georgian who, as much as President Mikhail S.
NEWS
May 11, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet Foreign Minister Alexander A. Bessmertnykh, in a historic visit to Israel, said Friday that the prospects for peace in the Middle East are "quite substantial" and indicated that Moscow would not attempt to pressure Israel by limiting the emigration of Soviet Jews.
NEWS
January 7, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze spent Saturday meeting with Romania's new leaders and afterward said that he promised them the Soviet Union's "political, material and moral support." He said that talks on economic cooperation will begin "in the near future" and promised Romania increased shipments of oil and natural gas to help its 23 million citizens get through the winter with homes heated to near-normal levels for the first time in years.
NEWS
December 20, 1989 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a measure of the new thaw in East-West relations, Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze paid an unprecedented call at NATO headquarters here Tuesday, but he quickly followed the visit with a stiff warning that those pushing for German reunification endanger European stability.
WORLD
November 24, 2003 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
He was jeered in his own country as he ignominiously resigned from office Sunday, portrayed as an aging politician who got stuck in the same swamp of corruption, ethnic conflict and poverty that has beset so many of the former Soviet republics. But barely a decade earlier, Georgian President Eduard A. Shevardnadze had taken on formidable foes to help open the door for the Soviet Union's historic rapprochement with the West.
NEWS
December 21, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Incensed by right-wing critics and his nation's accelerating course toward "dictatorship," Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze abruptly resigned Thursday, dealing a spectacular and brutal blow to President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's efforts to salvage a domestic political consensus. His raspy voice quavering in anger, the normally debonair Georgian, who has been the No.
NEWS
February 11, 1998 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fragile calm of recent years is shattered: Russia's volatile southern neighbors, which have been recovering from wars that devastated them after the Soviet collapse in 1991, are in uproar again over the latest failed assassination attempt against the region's grand old man, Georgian President Eduard A. Shevardnadze. The reason for Tuesday's disquiet is the fear among political leaders across the former Soviet south that Russia, the region's one big power, may have been behind the attack.
NEWS
August 30, 1995 | From Times Wire Services
Eduard A. Shevardnadze, the former Soviet foreign minister who left Moscow to lead his native Georgia, survived an apparent assassination attempt Tuesday when a bomb exploded near his motorcade. He escaped with only cuts from flying glass. Shevardnadze, best known for helping to carry out the perestroika reforms of Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev, has been trying to restore stability to this nation, which has been torn apart by rising crime and a separatist rebellion.
NEWS
August 30, 1991 | DAVID LAUTER and MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Boris N. Pankin, the new Soviet foreign minister, has seen the world turn full circle. As a brash Soviet journalist in his 40s, with a penchant for stories about police brutality, pollution and the number of abortions Soviet women must have because of the shortage of contraceptives, he fell afoul of the hard-line leadership group surrounding the late Soviet leader Leonid I. Brezhnev.
NEWS
May 13, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Syrian President Hafez Assad refused to budge on two key procedural issues during almost six hours of talks Sunday with Secretary of State James A. Baker III, raising serious doubts that a proposed Middle East peace conference will ever get under way. A senior U.S. official said the status of the negotiations after the Baker-Assad meeting in Damascus is "essentially the same that we came in with last night" when Baker arrived from Washington.
NEWS
May 11, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet Foreign Minister Alexander A. Bessmertnykh, in a historic visit to Israel, said Friday that the prospects for peace in the Middle East are "quite substantial" and indicated that Moscow would not attempt to pressure Israel by limiting the emigration of Soviet Jews.
NEWS
May 8, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet Foreign Minister Alexander A. Bessmertnykh heads for the Middle East today with a peace initiative and also, most likely, keen hopes of restoring diplomatic relations with Israel after nearly a quarter-century break. "The purpose of the visit is to attempt to launch the process of a Middle East settlement," said his spokesman, Vitaly I. Churkin. "We think that will be the main topic of his visits to Middle East countries, including Israel."
NEWS
February 22, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze straddled the bitter divide between Israel and the PLO in intense but separate talks with their leaders today. Shevardnadze put to Israeli Foreign Minister Moshe Arens' Moscow's proposal for an international conference on Middle East peace against Israel's repeated rejection and insistence on direct talks with the Arabs. The Soviet foreign minister and Arens differed on peace policies during their three hours of talks.
NEWS
April 22, 1988 | Reuters
Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze said today he had no plans to accept an open invitation to visit Israel from Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir. "The conditions are not yet ripe for such a visit," Shevardnadze told a Moscow news conference after two days of discussions with Secretary of State George P. Shultz in which the Middle East was a major topic.
NEWS
March 31, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze, urging new efforts for a broad Middle East peace in the wake of the Persian Gulf War, proposed in an interview published today that the U.N. Security Council's permanent members now begin intense collaboration on the Arab-Israeli conflict. Shevardnadze, now head of the new Soviet Foreign Policy Assn., also called for the appointment of a special U.N.
OPINION
March 31, 1991 | Michael Parks, Michael Parks is Moscow bureau chief for The Times
According to Soviet political tradition, retired politicians become nonpersons. Once they leave office, they disappear. If they leave with honor, their names go into history books. They do not, however, speak out on current affairs. But Eduard A. Shevardnadze, the former Soviet foreign minister, has no plans, at age 63, to drift quietly into such obscurity. The suave, silver-haired Georgian who, as much as President Mikhail S.
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