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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1989
Nicholas Daniloff makes a statement which has challenged me: " . . . The world saw more clearly than before that Armenians are deeply emotional and possibly paranoid. Like the Jews, they fear extinction" ("A Shock to the Soviet Foundation; In Armenian Rubble, Moscow's Ethnic Problems Grow," Editorial Page, Jan. 28.). But isn't that "normal" and shouldn't anyone become deeply emotional and on guard when their very existence, their identity is at stake? How else could Armenians and Jews have survived despite their tumultuous histories?
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NEWS
June 29, 1989 | JIM CARLTON, Times Staff Writer
Tony Aliengena of San Juan Capistrano upstaged Lenin's tomb on Wednesday, drawing hundreds of Soviets out of line as he and his family unfurled a 1,000-foot scroll in the middle of Red Square. The event climaxed a day in which the 11-year-old aviator and his family met with top Soviet officials in the Kremlin. They presented the scroll and a sackful of 75,000 pen-pal letters as good-will gestures from children in the United States to children in the Soviet Union. The show of support softened the disappointment the Aliengenas experienced in not being able to meet with Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, who was reported to be presiding over the Supreme Soviet.
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NEWS
June 27, 1989 | JIM CARLTON, Times Staff Writer
Eleven-year-old Tony Aliengena learned after he landed at Moscow's Sheremetyvo Airport on Monday that odds are against his presenting Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev a friendship scroll bearing good will signatures from more than 250,000 U.S. schoolchildren. Gorbachev probably will be kept busy all week presiding over the session of the Supreme Soviet, said Sergei Tchermeykh, an official of the Ministry of Civil Aviation, whose 10-year-old son, Roman, is accompanying Tony around the world.
NEWS
June 27, 1989 | JIM CARLTON, Times Staff Writer
Eleven-year-old Tony Aliengena learned after he landed at Moscow's Sheremetyvo Airport on Monday that odds are against his presenting Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev a friendship scroll bearing good will signatures from more than 250,000 U.S. schoolchildren. Gorbachev probably will be kept busy all week presiding over the session of the Supreme Soviet, said Sergei Tchermeykh, an official of the Ministry of Civil Aviation, whose 10-year-old son, Roman, is accompanying Tony around the world.
NEWS
June 29, 1989 | JIM CARLTON, Times Staff Writer
Tony Aliengena of San Juan Capistrano upstaged Lenin's tomb on Wednesday, drawing hundreds of Soviets out of line as he and his family unfurled a 1,000-foot scroll in the middle of Red Square. The event climaxed a day in which the 11-year-old aviator and his family met with top Soviet officials in the Kremlin. They presented the scroll and a sackful of 75,000 pen-pal letters as good-will gestures from children in the United States to children in the Soviet Union. The show of support softened the disappointment the Aliengenas experienced in not being able to meet with Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, who was reported to be presiding over the Supreme Soviet.
NEWS
June 23, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
Eleven-year-old Tony Aliengena, reaching a milestone in his "friendship flight" around the world, landed in Leningrad today where he was greeted by a group of schoolchildren who crowded around to give him flowers and welcome him to the "land of the Soviets." "The flight was short and easy, and it's great to be here," the boy from San Juan Capistrano said as he stepped out of his Cessna 210 Centurion after the hour-and-40-minute flight from Helsinki, Finland. Eleven-year-old Tanya Barabash gave Tony a brown loaf of bread and a cup of salt--the traditional Russian welcome--and then recited a poem in Russian that she had written herself.
NEWS
June 24, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
Eleven-year-old Tony Aliengena, reaching a milestone in his Friendship Flight around the world, landed in Leningrad on Friday. Children crowded around to give him flowers and welcome him to the "land of the Soviets." "The flight was short and easy, and it's great to be here," the boy from San Juan Capistrano said as he stepped out of his Cessna 210 Centurion after the hour-and-40-minute flight from Helsinki, Finland. Tanya Barabash, 11, gave Tony a loaf of brown bread and a cup of salt--the traditional Russian welcome--and then recited a poem in Russian that she wrote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1989 | JIM CARLTON, Times Staff Writer
The negotiations have gone on for nearly one full year, sometimes in person and sometimes on the phone. There have been problems at times, last-minute hitches to be resolved. But if all goes as scheduled, the months of wrangling will result Monday in a momentous event: the landing in Moscow of an 11-year-old pilot from San Juan Capistrano, Tony Aliengena. Thousands of requests are filed each year by foreigners hoping to travel through parts of the Soviet Union, long off-limits to outsiders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1989 | NICHOLAS DANILOFF, Nicholas Daniloff, former Moscow correspondent for U.S. News and World Report, is a fellow at the Joan Shorenstein Barone Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy at Harvard University.
Nations, like human beings, often reveal their true selves in catastrophe. So, more than a month after the Armenian earthquake, we may ask: What do we know about the Soviet Union that we didn't see so clearly before? It has become much clearer that the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics is hardly "a more perfect union" in any American sense, but an imperfect confederation of nations, held together with difficulty by force, central economic planning and political maneuvering.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1990 | From a Times Staff Writer
' . . .We wanted someone to speak to the soul of the Soviet people.' --Valentin Lazutkin Television minister Robert H. Schuller will videotape once-a-month religious programs for Soviet national television for at least 12 months starting in September, it was announced this week in Washington.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1989 | JIM CARLTON, Times Staff Writer
The negotiations have gone on for nearly one full year, sometimes in person and sometimes on the phone. There have been problems at times, last-minute hitches to be resolved. But if all goes as scheduled, the months of wrangling will result Monday in a momentous event: the landing in Moscow of an 11-year-old pilot from San Juan Capistrano, Tony Aliengena. Thousands of requests are filed each year by foreigners hoping to travel through parts of the Soviet Union, long off-limits to outsiders.
NEWS
June 24, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
Eleven-year-old Tony Aliengena, reaching a milestone in his Friendship Flight around the world, landed in Leningrad on Friday. Children crowded around to give him flowers and welcome him to the "land of the Soviets." "The flight was short and easy, and it's great to be here," the boy from San Juan Capistrano said as he stepped out of his Cessna 210 Centurion after the hour-and-40-minute flight from Helsinki, Finland. Tanya Barabash, 11, gave Tony a loaf of brown bread and a cup of salt--the traditional Russian welcome--and then recited a poem in Russian that she wrote.
NEWS
June 23, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
Eleven-year-old Tony Aliengena, reaching a milestone in his "friendship flight" around the world, landed in Leningrad today where he was greeted by a group of schoolchildren who crowded around to give him flowers and welcome him to the "land of the Soviets." "The flight was short and easy, and it's great to be here," the boy from San Juan Capistrano said as he stepped out of his Cessna 210 Centurion after the hour-and-40-minute flight from Helsinki, Finland. Eleven-year-old Tanya Barabash gave Tony a brown loaf of bread and a cup of salt--the traditional Russian welcome--and then recited a poem in Russian that she had written herself.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1989
Nicholas Daniloff makes a statement which has challenged me: " . . . The world saw more clearly than before that Armenians are deeply emotional and possibly paranoid. Like the Jews, they fear extinction" ("A Shock to the Soviet Foundation; In Armenian Rubble, Moscow's Ethnic Problems Grow," Editorial Page, Jan. 28.). But isn't that "normal" and shouldn't anyone become deeply emotional and on guard when their very existence, their identity is at stake? How else could Armenians and Jews have survived despite their tumultuous histories?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1989 | NICHOLAS DANILOFF, Nicholas Daniloff, former Moscow correspondent for U.S. News and World Report, is a fellow at the Joan Shorenstein Barone Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy at Harvard University.
Nations, like human beings, often reveal their true selves in catastrophe. So, more than a month after the Armenian earthquake, we may ask: What do we know about the Soviet Union that we didn't see so clearly before? It has become much clearer that the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics is hardly "a more perfect union" in any American sense, but an imperfect confederation of nations, held together with difficulty by force, central economic planning and political maneuvering.
NEWS
June 27, 1989 | JIM CARLTON, Times Staff Writer
Eleven-year-old Tony Aliengena arrived to a welcome from enthusiastic Soviet schoolchildren and curious airline pilots at Moscow's Sheremetyevo airport Monday after a blunder by his on-board Soviet navigator sent him briefly off course. The mistake happened while Tony was on approach to the Moscow airport following a 400-mile flight from Leningrad, his father, Gary Aliengena, said. The navigator, who boarded Tony's plane in Leningrad, provided an erroneous course heading for the Moscow airport, sending the child aviator from San Juan Capistrano in the wrong direction for about half an hour, Aliengena said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1989 | JIM CARLTON, Times Staff Writer
Tony Aliengena, arriving in the United States after an unprecedented flight across the Soviet Union, headed for a fishing retreat Saturday to rest before beginning the flight home to Orange County. The 11-year-old from San Juan Capistrano and his family plan to fish before starting their final descent Monday down the West Coast, with the last stop to be John Wayne Airport on Thursday. Tony arrived late Friday night at Nome Municipal Airport after crossing the Bering Strait.
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