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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1989
The Soviet Republic of Georgia authorizing a group of high school students to openly study religious history is yet another example of the tremendous gains being made on behalf of human rights in the Soviet Union ("Students in Soviet Georgia Take New Course--Religion," Part I, Feb. 12). Over the past 70 years, Soviet Christians and others have faced harassment, persecution--even imprisonment--for expressing their religious beliefs. Yet, despite the harsh persecution of believers, Christianity has continued to grow to an estimated 60 million believers throughout the Soviet Union today.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
Shortly into the documentary "The Machine Which Makes Everything Disappear," director Tinatin Gurchiani asks an interviewee: "If I come with you, will you show me your life?" It's an intriguing, grandly put question whose promise is never quite fulfilled in this thoughtful but slow and random snapshot of life in the former Soviet republic of Georgia. Wanting to make a film about growing up in her war-torn home country, Gurchiani posted a casting call for Georgians aged 15 to 23 with on-camera ambitions - or at least curiosity.
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NEWS
November 20, 1989 | From Times wire services
Once-independent Soviet Georgia, in a new challenge to the Kremlin from the restless outlying republics, has formally proclaimed its right to secede from the Soviet Union, Georgian reporters in Tbilisi said today. The reporters said the republican Parliament voted Sunday to insert a new clause in the Georgian constitution on "the holy and inviolable right" of secession from the nominally federal Soviet state.
WORLD
December 8, 2009 | By Megan K. Stack
In the snow-hushed woods on Moscow's northern edge, scientists are decades deep into research on bending the weather to their will. They've been at it since Soviet dictator Josef Stalin paused long enough in the throes of World War II to found an observatory dedicated to tampering with climatic inconveniences. Since then, they've melted away fog, dissipated the radioactive fallout from Chernobyl and called down rains fierce enough to drown unborn locusts threatening the distant northeastern grasslands.
NEWS
March 10, 1990 | From Associated Press
The Parliament of the Soviet republic of Georgia on Friday condemned its forcible annexation to the Soviet Union more than half a century ago and demanded talks on restoration of its independence, a local news agency reported. Georgia thus becomes the fourth of the 15 Soviet republics, after Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia, to take action condemning its incorporation into the Soviet Union. Lithuania's Parliament is expected to vote on a formal declaration of independence on Sunday.
NEWS
November 21, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
The Georgian republic, reaffirming its right under the national constitution to secede from the Soviet Union, has declared that any move by Moscow to limit that right would trigger Georgia's withdrawal from the Soviet state. Reporters in Tbilisi, the republic's capital, said Georgia's Parliament voted Sunday to insert a clause in the Georgian constitution on "the holy and inviolable right" of secession from the Soviet Union.
NEWS
May 2, 1991 | Associated Press
The acting president of the Adzharian autonomous region in Soviet Georgia was shot and wounded by his vice president, who then was killed by presidential guards, Tass reported Wednesday. Only sketchy details of Tuesday's shootings were reported by Tass in its dispatch from the Adzharian capital of Batumi, a Black Sea port near the Turkish border. It gave no motive for the attack. Vice President Nodar Imiadze and two associates stormed into the office of acting President A.
NEWS
March 26, 1987 | From Reuters
Avalanches followed by floods killed 110 people and caused about $500 million in damage in the southern Soviet republic of Georgia earlier this year, the government daily Izvestia said Wednesday. In the most detailed report to date on the heavy snows in January and a sudden thaw in February, Izvestia said 8,200 people were evacuated from mountain areas.
NEWS
April 20, 1989 | From Times wire services
A landslide in the Georgian village of Tsablana buried houses and a bus full of passengers under mud today, leaving 52 people dead, Soviet television said. The landslide, caused by melting snow, also blocked an entire river and forced the evacuation of 800 families, the television news program Vremya said. Plans were made to evacuate 3,000 more people from the village in the Adjarian Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic, part of Georgia. "Fifty-two people are dead," the Vremya news show said.
NEWS
June 15, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
A strong earthquake struck a mountainous region in the southern Soviet Union early today and officials said at least five children were killed and 25 other people hospitalized. The quake occurred near an area hit by another temblor in April. Today's earthquake hit he republic of Georgia at 3:59 a.m. (6 p.m. PDT Friday), according to U.S. and Soviet monitors. It was a 6.3-magnitude quake, said Rebecca Phipps, a spokeswoman for the National Earthquake Information Center in Reston, Va.
FOOD
November 27, 1992 | CHARLES PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This book came out at the end of last year, just as Soviet Georgia was changing its name to Independent Georgia. A classic case of bad timing, but on the other hand, "Soviet Georgia" has the advantage of being recognizable. And you've got to have some way of making sure people know the Georgia you're talking about is located between Turkey, Russia and Armenia and has nothing to do with Ted Turner or the Braves.
NEWS
October 6, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Violence again erupted Saturday in Soviet Georgia when forces loyal to the republic's president clashed with opposition protesters throughout the morning on the main street of the capital, and one person was shot dead and more than 80 wounded.
NEWS
September 28, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The armed opposition to Georgian President Zviad Gamsakhurdia lost its hilltop redoubt and splintered into squabbling factions Friday, with some leaders demanding that mutinous national guard units pull out of the capital. Talks between the opposition and Gamsakhurdia's government, hosted by Ilya II, the widely respected prelate of the Georgian church, continued late into the night. The political crisis has claimed six deaths this month.
NEWS
September 27, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Branding its armed opponents terrorists, the government of President Zviad Gamsakhurdia blockaded a rebel stronghold with loyalist troops Thursday night and shut off electricity to the neighborhood, effectively cutting off the opposition forces from their other bases in the city. "We will take the same practical steps to disarm them that are used everywhere to disarm terrorists," the Georgian president's spokesman vowed.
NEWS
September 26, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With five people killed overnight, tensions in the southwest Soviet republic of Georgia approached the breaking point Wednesday as rebel national guard units dug in for a firefight. Georgian President Zviad Gamsakhurdia, in a stem-winding speech to thousands massed in front of government headquarters, made it clear he was standing fast. He repeated his customary offer to take part in negotiations.
NEWS
September 25, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG and CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the sharpening struggle between Georgia's embattled president and his armed opponents, rebellious members of the southern Soviet republic's national guard attacked a power station here early today but were fought off by police loyal to him in a gun battle that left four dead and four wounded. President Zviad Gamsakhurdia, who only hours before had declared a state of emergency in Georgia, declared his intention to fight back with all the force at his disposal.
NEWS
May 4, 1991 | From Associated Press
Two aftershocks from a severe earthquake set off landslides Friday that killed at least three people in the mountains of Soviet Georgia. At least 114 people died in Monday's quake and its aftermath, the official Tass news agency reported. The temblor also injured 300, left 70 missing and 67,000 homeless in the southern republic, it said. An unconfirmed report by Soviet television news said the final toll may reach 300 dead and 1,000 injured.
NEWS
April 21, 1989 | From Reuters
Landslides and flooding in a mountainous region of Soviet Georgia killed more than 50 people and destroyed hundreds of houses Wednesday night, Soviet television reported Thursday. The television showed wrecked buildings in a sea of mud, rocks and melting snow, with rescue teams picking through the shattered remains for survivors in the Adzharia region, close to the Soviet border with Turkey. It said 52 people had been caught in the deluge which had hit the village of Tsablana.
NEWS
September 24, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Heavily armed backers and opponents of Georgian President Zviad Gamsakhurdia kept an uneasy vigil Monday night at their headquarters, fearful that their escalating political battle could erupt once again into violence. At Gamsakhurdia's government building in downtown Tbilisi, spokesmen said they believe that only peaceful talks can relieve the acute political unrest that has beset this grape-growing Caucasus republic for more than a month.
NEWS
September 18, 1991 | From Associated Press
Three Georgian opposition leaders were detained Tuesday, spurring new protests against President Zviad Gamsakhurdia, with crowds forcing government-controlled television and radio off the air. Georgy Chanturia, head of the National Democratic Party, was being held incommunicado at the Interior Ministry, according to aides. They said officials told them the opposition leader was refusing all food and water.
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