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NEWS
August 28, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The purge of top officials in the wake of last week's failed coup spread Tuesday to almost every department of the Soviet government as top officials in organizations ranging from the Interior Ministry to the Chamber of Commerce and Industry packed up their bags. In a move to dismantle the old Soviet power structure and consolidate power among officials loyal to Russian Federation President Boris N.
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AUTOS
March 20, 2002
For some, getting noticed is what being in L.A. is all about, and what better way to get noticed than by driving an unusual car? Boy, have we got one for you. Porsches? Passe. Hot rods? Ho-hum. Convertibles? So conventional. We're talking 1982 Zil-115 limousine. And not just any limo but the Presidential Transporter that was maintained by the KGB in Moscow for the personal use of Soviet General Secretary Yuri Andropov from 1982 through 1984.
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NEWS
March 10, 1985 | LOUISE BRANSON, United Press International
Dictator Josef Stalin's 13-year-old American granddaughter is said to be stubbornly refusing to adjust to her new life in the Soviet Union--for her, an alien country whose language she does not speak. Soviet authorities, apparently seeking to coax teen-age Olga Peters into trying to adapt to her new home, have sent her to Stalin's native southern republic of Georgia.
NEWS
October 20, 2001 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The deadliest anthrax outbreak on record began in silence and killed quietly--both literally and figuratively. Sometime on April 2, 1979, millions of anthrax spores began to spread across southern sections of the Ural Mountains city known at the time as Sverdlovsk. A meat-plant worker named Vasily Ivanov was out walking his dog. The day shift at a ceramics factory was grinding sand and clay. In a little more than a week, Ivanov was dead. So were 18 ceramics workers.
NEWS
April 11, 1988 | Associated Press
Officials of Honeywell Inc., and a Soviet government ministry today announced a multimillion-dollar joint venture to equip Soviet fertilizer plants with high-technology production control equipment. The deal, one of only a handful between the Soviet government and U.S. businesses, was announced as a group of 400 Americans led by Commerce Secretary C. William Verity arrived for trade talks with Soviet officials.
NEWS
August 26, 1991 | Associated Press
Former East German leader Erich Honecker may be returned from the Soviet Union, now that his hard-line protectors have been ousted after the failed coup, a newspaper reported Sunday. Bild am Sonntag newspaper quoted Vatsheslava Dashitshev, an adviser to Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, as saying that Honecker was illegally spirited to Moscow on March 13 by hard-liners in the Soviet government.
BUSINESS
June 14, 1989
Direct Dialing to Moscow to Resume: Callers in the United States will be able to dial Moscow directly this fall for the first time since 1982 under an agreement with the Soviet government, American Telephone & Telegraph Co. said. AT&T added that the move will improve transmissions from facsimile machines and computers.
NEWS
September 7, 1986 | United Press International
The Soviet government Saturday condemned the hijacking of a Pan American World Airways jumbo jet in Pakistan and called for international action to prevent terrorism. The official Tass news agency said it was authorized to state that "the Soviet Union most resolutely condemns this act of terrorism and calls upon all states for effective cooperation so as to eradicate fully this dangerous phenomenon." "This should be done without delay," the statement said.
NEWS
July 30, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a young agent of the Soviet secret police, Mikhail A. Neverovsky remembers going with a squad of soldiers to the homes of two families in 1949 and delivering the order: They would be sent to Siberia that day. "We gave them two hours to collect everything, first at one house and then the other," Neverovsky recalled in an interview last week. "I helped them pack their things."
NEWS
August 17, 1993 | LORI CIDYLO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When people here learned that the army was using an ancient monastery complex as a firing range, Ekaterina Pribalova found a way to convey their outrage to indifferent bureaucrats. Then a 25-year-old graduate student, she marched into the grand offices of the Ministry of Culture with a bomb she had found inside one of the monastery's churches. "She put it right on the beautiful white marble table," recalls Georgy Marsagishvili, a medieval historian who was in the ministry that day.
NEWS
December 12, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yevgeny I. Ignatenko laughed when asked who is now in charge of the Soviet Atomic Energy Ministry. "If we understood that ourselves, it would be easier to answer that question," the ministry spokesman replied. "I suppose we're all our own bosses. Anarchy is the mother of order, they say." Anarchy, in a slow, creeping form, has plagued the tottering remains of the Soviet central government since the August coup attempt.
NEWS
December 1, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin, moving to resolve a major budget crisis, agreed on Saturday to bail out Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's near-bankrupt central government--at a price.
NEWS
November 18, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin, moving boldly to implement his promised program of radical economic reforms, assumed control of key elements of the Soviet Union's financial system over the weekend. Asserting the right of the federation to control its economy, Yeltsin ordered the republic's Finance Ministry to assume the duties of the Soviet Finance Ministry, including the issuance of money and custody of the country's gold reserves.
NEWS
September 12, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian Federation Prime Minister Ivan S. Silayev resigned Wednesday from one of the highest posts in the provisional Soviet government, exposing rifts within the leadership that has been charged with guiding the fracturing federation into a new post-Communist union. The Tass news agency said Silayev will step down as chairman of the National Economy Committee on Monday. It made no mention of a successor.
NEWS
March 6, 1988
The Kremlin proposed a major expansion of private enterprise that would encourage direct competition with state-run businesses, according to a draft law announced in the Soviet government newspaper Izvestia. Among other things, the law, subject to approval by the Supreme Soviet, the parliament, would allow cooperatives to conduct business with foreign companies and to receive hard currency as payment and give them the right to own property and hire consultants.
NEWS
September 30, 1985 | From Reuters
The Soviet government has decreed that two traditional public holidays, Constitution Day and Revolution Day, will be workdays this year, Moscow newspapers reported Sunday. The decree appeared aimed at bolstering production in key economic sectors, including oil, steel and chemicals, which are lagging behind levels achieved last year. Constitution Day, on Oct. 5, commemorates the adoption of the 1977 Soviet constitution. Revolution Day, on Nov. 12, marks the Bolshevik seizure of power in 1917.
OPINION
September 8, 1991 | MARTIN MALIA, Martin Malia is a professor of history at UC Berkeley. His writings on Soviet affairs include a 1990 piece for the journal Daedalus under the pseudonym "Z."
Three weeks after Russia's August coup, we still find in America a strange misunderstanding of what, in fact, occurred, and what it means. First, the providentially botched coup was in fact no coup at all, but an act of the Soviet government, representing the whole Communist Establishment--the party, the military-industrial complex, the army command and the KGB. Its leaders' aim was to depose a chief whose indecision they believed, correctly, was letting the system drift into catastrophe.
NEWS
August 28, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The purge of top officials in the wake of last week's failed coup spread Tuesday to almost every department of the Soviet government as top officials in organizations ranging from the Interior Ministry to the Chamber of Commerce and Industry packed up their bags. In a move to dismantle the old Soviet power structure and consolidate power among officials loyal to Russian Federation President Boris N.
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