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Soviet Invasion

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NEWS
July 30, 1989 | From Reuters
Ousted Czech leader Alexander Dubcek has told a Polish newspaper the 1968 Soviet-led invasion of his country must be officially condemned before progress can be made with political reforms. "It has to be officially admitted that on Aug. 21, 1968, our allies from five socialist countries forcibly made Czechoslovakia change its political course," Dubcek told the Solidarity daily Gazeta Wyborcza.
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WORLD
September 10, 2012 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
KHAZANA, Pakistan - Awal Gul knows that home is just a two-hour drive over the jagged ridgeline that separates Pakistan from Afghanistan. But he hasn't been there in more than 30 years, since Soviet tanks rolled into Kabul. A refugee of a long-gone era, he doesn't have a patch of land to return to, or a house or a job. That may not matter. Pakistan is growing increasingly impatient as host of the world's largest refugee community - millions of Afghans who fled the Soviet invasion and, later, Taliban rule.
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NEWS
December 1, 1989 | From Reuters
The Czechoslovak Communist Party under new leader Karel Urbanek today repudiated the 1968 Warsaw Pact invasion that crushed the Prague Spring attempt to introduce liberal reforms in the country. Vasil Mohorita, a member of the ruling Politburo, said: "We believe that the intervention in our territory of five countries of the Warsaw Pact in 1968 was not justified and the decision to do it was wrong."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2011 | Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Moscow -- Yelena Bonner, human rights activist and widow of Soviet dissident and Nobel Peace Prize winner Andrei Sakharov, has died. She was 88. Bonner died Saturday afternoon in Boston after a long illness, said her daughter, Tatiana Yankelevich. Bonner had lived in the United States since 2003. "Sakharov and Bonner together had done more for our country than a huge number of politicians," Boris Nemtsov, leader of the Solidarity opposition movement and a former deputy prime minister of Russia, said Sunday.
SPORTS
April 30, 1989 | BRIAN FRIEDMAN, Associated Press
This spring has seen perhaps the greatest thaw for Soviet athletes seeking their fortune, fame and even a little freedom in the sports arenas of North America. There's a Soviet hockey player skating for the Calgary Flames in the NHL, tennis star Natalia Zvereva signed with a U.S. agent and boldly criticized her nation's tennis federation over her prize money, progress has been made toward bringing a Soviet player to the NBA next season, and an agreement was reached for 10 Soviet boxers to fight in the United States this year.
OPINION
January 30, 2005
Photojournalist Zalmai was born in Afghanistan, but left as a 15-year-old in 1980, joining the more than 1 million Afghans who fled the country that year following the Soviet invasion. He has since captured images from around the world. When he returned to his native land in October to cover the country's first presidential election, a 65-year-old woman he met at the polls told him, " 'This is the first time in my life someone asked my opinion about what is going on in Afghanistan.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1988
So Columbia Pics President Dawn Steel thinks the film "The Beast" lacks "broad-based American appeal" ("Tough as Steel," by Nina J. Easton, Oct. 30). Perhaps she needs to take a look inside her calloused consciousness and admit that she has become conditioned to genocide in the 20th Century. Give me a break, Ms. Steel. "The Killing Fields," a chronicle of Pol Pot's reign of terror in Cambodia, was favorably received by Hollywood and the public. Moreover, her statement that "The Beast" was "too violent to secure a spot at the Cannes Film Festival" smacks of her heart of steel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1992
History, especially of the downfall of communism, will place Alexander Dubcek at a much higher pedestal than many others ("Alexander Dubcek, Hero of 'Prague Spring,' Dies," Nov. 8). Much credit is due to him because he was the leader who stood up to the might of the then-Soviet power. It was a ruthless dictatorship of the communist elite. Dubcek was the one who initiated the process of changing communism to give it a humane face. The seeds he had then sown did bear fruit, though 20 years later; but the face that refused to change was destroyed beyond recognition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1986
Fate has filled the month of August with reminders of the true nature of the Soviet Union and its guiding Communist ideology. On Aug. 13 the world observed the 25th anniversary of the construction of the Berlin Wall. The international outrage over that event (which was actually celebrated in East Berlin) overshadowed the 18th anniversary of the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia. On Aug. 13, 1968, the U.S.S.R. greeted Prague's "socialism with a human face" with tanks and armored personnel carriers.
OPINION
January 30, 2005
Photojournalist Zalmai was born in Afghanistan, but left as a 15-year-old in 1980, joining the more than 1 million Afghans who fled the country that year following the Soviet invasion. He has since captured images from around the world. When he returned to his native land in October to cover the country's first presidential election, a 65-year-old woman he met at the polls told him, " 'This is the first time in my life someone asked my opinion about what is going on in Afghanistan.
OPINION
August 18, 2003 | Mark Kurlansky
Thirty-five years ago, on Aug. 20, 1968, Anton Tazky -- a secretary of the Slovak Party Central Committee and a personal friend of Czechoslovakian Communist Party chief Alexander Dubcek -- was driving back to Bratislava from an outlying district. He noticed odd, bright lights in the distance, and as he drove closer, he realized he had been seeing the headlights of tanks and military trucks with soldiers in foreign uniforms at the wheels. A movie shoot, Tazky decided.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1992
History, especially of the downfall of communism, will place Alexander Dubcek at a much higher pedestal than many others ("Alexander Dubcek, Hero of 'Prague Spring,' Dies," Nov. 8). Much credit is due to him because he was the leader who stood up to the might of the then-Soviet power. It was a ruthless dictatorship of the communist elite. Dubcek was the one who initiated the process of changing communism to give it a humane face. The seeds he had then sown did bear fruit, though 20 years later; but the face that refused to change was destroyed beyond recognition.
NEWS
September 13, 1990 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. troop deployment to Saudi Arabia has been a massive undertaking by any measure. Over the last five weeks, steady streams of cargo ships have unloaded hundreds of tanks and other equipment to bolster U.S. ground forces there. But the sea lift has become so large that Navy transportation strategists have found they need more fast roll-on, roll-off cargo vessels to keep up the pace--and they are thinking seriously about chartering a large Soviet version of the ship, now docked in Cuba.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1990 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reciprocating a visit from a congressional committee, a group of Soviet defense lawmakers will visit several military installations throughout the United States next week, spending three days in San Diego. Ten members of the Supreme Soviet Committee on Defense and State Security and their entourage will arrive in Washington Feb. 7 for an 11-day visit. Their trip comes after the visit of the House Armed Services Committee to the Soviet Union last August.
NEWS
December 10, 1989 | TYLER MARSHALL and DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Three weeks after it was born, this nation's opposition of students and political amateurs on Saturday won its revolution. The victory was sweeping: -- In a new government to be formally announced today, the opposition will hold several key posts, including two deputy premierships and the portfolios of foreign affairs and economic affairs. -- While the prime ministership remains in Communist hands, the new government pushed the Communist Party into a minority role.
NEWS
June 20, 1985 | United Press International
Arne Treholt, who held posts in the Foreign Ministry and other government departments, was sentenced today to a maximum 20 years in prison for spying for the Soviet Union and Iraq in Norway's most serious espionage case. An Oslo district court found Treholt guilty on virtually all 52 counts, including giving Moscow detailed plans for the nuclear and conventional defense of Norway against a possible Soviet invasion. Norway makes up NATO's northern flank.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1988
As a member of the local organization committee that hosted four Soviet citizens' visit to Irvine, I would like to correct the misconceptions of those who wrote (June 22 Letters) to express their opposition to our project. Sterling Evans wanted to know why we did not "initiate some strong words on behalf of all the political prisoners dying daily in Soviet labor camps while we entertain those who put them there." I wish that Evans had taken the time to attend the reception for our guests at Irvine City Hall, he would have learned that our visitors were not "those who put them there."
NEWS
December 1, 1989 | From Reuters
The Czechoslovak Communist Party under new leader Karel Urbanek today repudiated the 1968 Warsaw Pact invasion that crushed the Prague Spring attempt to introduce liberal reforms in the country. Vasil Mohorita, a member of the ruling Politburo, said: "We believe that the intervention in our territory of five countries of the Warsaw Pact in 1968 was not justified and the decision to do it was wrong."
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