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ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1987
For a few days it seemed as though we had cause to be optimistic. However, announcements of a shift in Jewish emigration policy, which could have meant freedom for as many as 12,000 Soviet Jews, have now been denied by Moscow through Foreign Ministry spokesman Gennady I. Gerasimov.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2010 | By Thane Rosenbaum, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When They Come for Us, We'll Be Gone The Epic Struggle to Save Soviet Jewry Gal Beckerman Houghton Mifflin Harcourt: 598 pp., $30 If you think the Cold War is dead as the backdrop for any decent espionage story, you haven't read "When They Come for Us, We'll Be Gone: The Epic Struggle to Save Soviet Jewry," journalist Gal Beckerman's reheating of the politics of the Cold War and of how the millions of Russian Jews and the Americans...
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2009 | Jon Thurber
In the late 1960s, as reports of repression of Soviet Jews began to increase, a question began filtering to the West: "Why have you forgotten us?" Si Frumkin, a survivor of Dachau and a prominent Los Angeles textile manufacturer, heard the question and it reminded him of the days before the Holocaust. A man of direct action, Frumkin founded the Southern California Council for Soviet Jews in 1968 and over the next two decades would not leave the issue alone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2009 | Jon Thurber
In the late 1960s, as reports of repression of Soviet Jews began to increase, a question began filtering to the West: "Why have you forgotten us?" Si Frumkin, a survivor of Dachau and a prominent Los Angeles textile manufacturer, heard the question and it reminded him of the days before the Holocaust. A man of direct action, Frumkin founded the Southern California Council for Soviet Jews in 1968 and over the next two decades would not leave the issue alone.
NEWS
January 12, 1989 | Associated Press
As many as 10,000 Soviet Jews were allowed to visit relatives in Israel last year in a wave inspired by Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's policy of more openness, it was reported Wednesday. Arrivals began last spring and "in 1988 we figure there were between 8,000 and 10,000 who visited," said Rabbi Richard Hirsch, executive director of the World Union for Progressive Judaism, a private lobby. He said that even more Soviet Jews could visit this year.
OPINION
May 1, 1988
The report on the Israeli attempt to force all Soviet Jewish emigrants to go to Israel is very bad news for the 200,000 or so former Soviet Jews living in the United States now. Most of them have relatives in the Soviet Union and most of them have been hoping for many years that those relatives might be given a chance to be reunited with their families in the U.S. This new Israeli policy contravenes both the Helsinki Accords and the U.N. Declaration...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1990
One ugly aspect of the Soviet Union's greater toleration of political pluralism has been the emergence of far-right groups whose stock in trade is hatemongering and fomenting ethnic strife. Perhaps the most notorious of these is Pamyat, a Great Russian nationalistic movement whose anti-Semitic advocacy evokes chilling reminders of Russia's recent past.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1990
As co-chairman of Operation Exodus for Los Angeles, a worldwide effort to rescue Soviet Jews, I joined a small group in Moscow earlier this month to try and gain some understanding of the current status of Jews in the Soviet Union. As we boarded our van for the ride from the Moscow airport to our hotel, I asked the Intourist guide "How is life under perestroika ?" From my two previous visits to the Soviet Union I expected to hear the usual canned public relations response.
NEWS
December 15, 1990 | Washington Post
Germany proposed Friday to set a tight quota on the immigration of Soviet Jews, accepting as few as 1,000 a year despite tens of thousands of applications. According to spokesmen, the interior ministers of the 16 German states, meeting in Dresden, were nearly unanimous in support of the limit.
NEWS
September 2, 1987
Jews emigrating from the Soviet Union numbered 782 in August, raising the total so far this year to 4,681, the Intergovernmental Committee for Migration said on Tuesday. Of those who emigrated last month, 241 went to Israel, the destination of 1,180 Soviet Jews this year, the agency said. In July, 807 Soviet Jews were recorded as having emigrated via Vienna, and a total of 945 were permitted to leave the Soviet Union in 1986, the agency said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2008 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
For Zev Yaroslavsky, the personal has always been political. Yaroslavsky has represented the western part of Los Angeles County as a member of the Board of Supervisors since 1994. Previously, he served on the L.A. City Council for 19 years. But before he began his life in local politics, Yaroslavky was one of the leading activists in the international movement to free Soviet Jews, who, for many decades, were essentially prisoners in their own country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Former U.S. Rep. Charles Vanik of Ohio, who co-sponsored an effort to force the Soviet Union to allow more Jews to emigrate, died of natural causes Wednesday at his home in Jupiter, Fla. He was 94. The outspoken Democrat, a Catholic of Czech descent from Cleveland, was a congressman from 1955 to 1981. He had announced in early 1980 that he would not seek a 14th term in Congress that year, saying that he disliked being forced to raise funds and owe favors to donors. Vanik and then-Sen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1999 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Driving through the Sepulveda Pass on the San Diego Freeway, new generations of Southern Californians might easily assume that the Jewish religious and cultural institutions along the way have always been there. But the mountain pass that is home to the University of Judaism (1977), the Skirball Cultural Center (1996), Milken Community High School (1993) and Stephen S. Wise Temple (1968) wasn't always affectionately known as the "Hills of Judea." "I grew up in Los Angeles.
NEWS
January 16, 1999 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite occasional outbreaks of right-wing extremism and much public anguish about how to preserve the memory of the Holocaust, Germany now has the fastest-growing Jewish population outside Israel. However, the growing tide of Jewish immigration here is less a tribute to German social harmony than a troubling sign that anti-Semitism is on the rise elsewhere.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1997
So Rep. Brad Sherman says, "I am the easiest guy to tap on the shoulder . . . " ("A Running Start," Nov. 24). Well, it wasn't always so. Several months ago, a delegation of representatives of the Russian-speaking community in Southern California traveled to Washington to talk to our representatives about pending immigration and welfare changes. We visited dozens of lawmakers, Californians and out-of-staters. The only representative who refused to talk to us or make an appointment during the two days we were there was, you guessed it, Brad Sherman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1997 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Walking up one aisle and down the next, the middle-aged woman knew this was no ordinary trip to the market. She was making preparations for cooking her first Passover Seder, one that would be celebrated in her new home after years of repression in the former Soviet Union. Alla Ghydar, 53, was determined that everything should be kosher, as is the custom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1996 | LAURIE GOODSTEIN, WASHINGTON POST
Armed with a long list of people they see as contemporary Christian "martyrs" jailed, tortured and even killed overseas, evangelical church leaders have been prodding the Clinton administration and Congress to act.
NEWS
June 4, 1996 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One can still hear the smack of the scythe smashing her head. Denting her skull. How much is that brutal sound worth? One can still taste the grass that she chewed to quiet her ever-clawing hunger. How much is that bitter taste worth? One can still feel the panic that swamped him as he stood in a death line, waiting for the killers to get to his row. How much is that memory worth? How much? How to quantify the indescribable? How to calculate the unimaginable?
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