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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1987
In The Times' "Open-and-Shut Case?" editorial (Aug. 12) about Mikhail S. Gorbachev's policy of glasnost, or openness, in the Soviet media, Viktor Karpov, head of the Soviet Writers Union, is quoted as saying: "There are no forbidden topics." However, during a visit to the U.S.S.R. in May as a member of a peace delegation from the American Fellowship of Reconciliation, I discovered two. First, as president of the Los Angeles Center of PEN International, I probed the question of imprisoned writers and dissidents, and how their views are denied access to the media and the public.
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OPINION
January 5, 1992
As reported by your Moscow correspondent (Dec. 21), there is indeed a sense of panic among the publishers of the largest newspapers there, as they face the loss of governmental subsidies as of Jan. 2. Their spokesman is right: "No one will pay 8 rubles a copy"--the monthly total would almost equal the average worker's salary. There are two main reasons for their inability to compete without governmental subsidies, neither of which are mentioned. One of them is the end of a system that guaranteed enormous circulations by obliging all governmental bodies, organizations, libraries and "all civic-minded citizens" to subscribe to these publications.
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NEWS
January 17, 1989 | Associated Press
The Soviet media once fumed at President Reagan, but the nation's two most prestigious newspapers bid respectful and even fond farewells Monday to Reagan and his secretary of state, George P. Shultz, for helping U.S.-Soviet relations. "Of course, Reagan has remained Reagan, the anti-Communist and the troubadour of Western society," the government newspaper Izvestia said in a front-page article. "But the restructuring of international relations could not bypass the White House."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1991
A Western world profoundly disheartened by the Soviet Union's domestic swing to the right isn't likely to care too much about just what internal considerations brought it about. The European Community is threatening to cut off more than $500 million in technical aid to Moscow following the military crackdown in Lithuania. Some in Congress want to suspend what remains--about $200 million--of the $1 billion in agricultural credits that were granted to help get the Soviets through a hungry winter.
NEWS
January 15, 1989 | Associated Press
The sister of a man who said that he and five companions survived 35 days in the rubble of the Dec. 7 Armenian earthquake says the story was concocted so her brother could get into a good hospital, Soviet media reported Saturday. The Tass news agency said reporters had tracked down Aikaz Akopyan's sister, Julietta, who Akopyan said witnessed his rescue Jan. 11 from the ruins of his nine-story apartment building in the city of Leninakan.
NEWS
October 31, 1985 | ELEANOR CLIFT, Times Staff Writer
In what the White House termed "a unique and historic opportunity," President Reagan will be questioned by four Soviet journalists in the Oval Office today, the first such presidential interview since John F. Kennedy sat down with an Izvestia editor in 1961. The move is still another signal that Reagan hopes to counter the favorable impression that Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev has made on world opinion in advance of their summit meeting next month in Geneva.
NEWS
May 18, 1989 | From Associated Press
Soviet television viewers were treated Wednesday to pictures of their president strolling along the Great Wall of China and joking with young people about Chinese cooking. Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's visit to China dominated the state-run media, taking up all 45 minutes of the evening television news program "Vremya" and most of the first two pages of the government newspaper Izvestia. State-run television showed Gorbachev's speech to Chinese intellectuals before its evening news program, and his news conference in Beijing after the news program was over, giving viewers several hours of virtually uninterrupted coverage of Gorbachev's visit.
NEWS
January 10, 1985 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
The Geneva agreement to negotiate on nuclear and space weapons was welcomed here Wednesday as a triumph of Kremlin diplomacy that will reduce fears of superpower confrontation. Both the state-run media and ordinary citizens hailed the outcome of talks between Foreign Minister Andrei A. Gromyko and Secretary of State George P. Shultz. "Fears vanished with the news--there will be negotiations," reported Izvestia, the government newspaper, in its account of the Geneva meeting. "I'm glad.
NEWS
September 28, 1990 | Associated Press
Seeking to quell rumors of a military coup, Soviet media gave prominent coverage Thursday to the defense minister's assurance that recent troop movements were related to parade plans and the potato harvest, not a plot. "No army should use arms against its own people," Marshal Dmitri T. Yazov told Parliament on Wednesday in a 10-minute speech. His remarks were reported prominently Thursday in the Communist Party daily Pravda and the capital's Communist youth daily Moskovsky Komsomolets.
NEWS
January 16, 1989 | Associated Press
Soviet media once fumed at President Reagan, but two prestigious newspapers bid respectful and even fond farewells today to Reagan and his secretary of state, George P. Shultz, for helping U.S.-Soviet relations. "Of course, Reagan has remained Reagan, the anti-communist and the troubadour of Western society," the government newspaper Izvestia said in a front-page article. "But the restructuring of international relations could not bypass the White House."
NEWS
December 13, 1990 | From United Press International
A popular television journalist known for his aggressive crime reporting was shot and wounded by a stranger who lured him to an isolated Leningrad park with a promise of explosive documents, Soviet media said today. Alexander Nevzorov, anchor of the daily "Six Hundred Seconds" news program from Leningrad, was shot at point-blank range late Wednesday.
NEWS
October 6, 1990 | From Associated Press
Sergei G. Lapin, a former diplomat and journalist who told U.S. correspondents during the Watergate scandal that the story was not worth reporting in the Soviet Union, died Thursday, according to state television. He was 78. In a career that spanned six decades, Lapin served as head of two of the most powerful Soviet media organizations--the Gostelradio television and radio agency and the official Soviet news agency Tass. "Sergei Georgiyevich Lapin put all his strength and heart into all this.
NEWS
September 28, 1990 | Associated Press
Seeking to quell rumors of a military coup, Soviet media gave prominent coverage Thursday to the defense minister's assurance that recent troop movements were related to parade plans and the potato harvest, not a plot. "No army should use arms against its own people," Marshal Dmitri T. Yazov told Parliament on Wednesday in a 10-minute speech. His remarks were reported prominently Thursday in the Communist Party daily Pravda and the capital's Communist youth daily Moskovsky Komsomolets.
NEWS
August 1, 1990 | Associated Press
The first press-freedom law went into effect in the Soviet Union today, guaranteeing broad rights for journalists and potential publishers. The law, unanimously approved by the Supreme Soviet legislature in June after months of debate, promises: "The press and other mass media are free," and "censorship of the mass media is forbidden." Censorship by the Communist Party and the government kept the Soviet media under tight control before President Mikhail S. Gorbachev came to power in 1985.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1989 | MELOR STURUA, Melor Sturua, a Soviet journalist for 40 years, is on leave for one year as a senior associate of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington. and
Once upon a time, a Russian and his American friend were crossing Red Square in Moscow, discussing freedom of speech in their countries. "I can go to Lafayette Square and shout 'Down with President Nixon!' and nobody will arrest me," the American said. "Big deal! I can go to Red Square and shout, 'Down with President Nixon!' and nobody will arrest me," said the Russian. This anecdote is not only old, it is misleading.
NEWS
June 26, 1989 | From Associated Press
A fire that forced a Soviet nuclear submarine to limp toward port was caused by a pipe that burst, causing a reactor malfunction but no injuries, Soviet officials said today. The sub billowed smoke today as it steamed under the power of back-up diesel engines. Norwegian officials criticized Soviet officials for not informing them fully of the accident, the second involving a Soviet vessel off Norway in less than a week and the third in three months. 'It Is Unsatisfactory' "It is unsatisfactory for us as a neighboring state not to be warned," Defense Minister Johan Jorgen Holst told a news conference.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1991
A Western world profoundly disheartened by the Soviet Union's domestic swing to the right isn't likely to care too much about just what internal considerations brought it about. The European Community is threatening to cut off more than $500 million in technical aid to Moscow following the military crackdown in Lithuania. Some in Congress want to suspend what remains--about $200 million--of the $1 billion in agricultural credits that were granted to help get the Soviets through a hungry winter.
NEWS
May 15, 1985 | Associated Press
A cold snap in Kazakhstan that sent temperatures plunging as much as 70 degrees over a few hours has blanketed the southern republic with snow and damaged grain and vegetable crops, Soviet media reported Tuesday.
NEWS
June 12, 1989
American burn experts flew to the Soviet city of Ufa in the Ural Mountains to treat hundreds of victims of a huge gas pipeline explosion and fire June 4 that engulfed two trains on the Trans-Siberian Railway. The Soviet media said more than 400 people have died in the tragedy, with 805 people still hospitalized. The Tass news agency said the 17-member team of physicians brought their own drugs and equipment. The team is from the Institute of Surgical Research at Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio.
NEWS
June 12, 1989 | From Associated Press
Ethnic rioting that has killed about 100 people in the Uzbekistan republic has driven nearly 15,000 refugees into a camp where living conditions are so primitive that women give birth on the ground, Soviet media said Sunday. "The most explosive situation is here, in the refugee camp," for Meskhetians (minority Turks), said a report on the television news program "Vremya." The military newspaper Red Star said mobs of intoxicated residents continue to direct violence against Meskhetians in the republic's Fergana region.
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