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NEWS
July 28, 1989 | From Times wire service s
A Soviet Navy vessel picked up three Cuban refugees adrift in an inner-tube raft off the Florida coast today and helped them seek political asylum in the United States. The Soviets lowered a life raft into the water, picked up the refugees, then radioed the U.S. Coast Guard and asked them to pick up the Cubans, the Coast Guard said. The refugees said they left from Santa Cruz, Cuba, last Saturday aboard a 12-foot boat that later capsized and sank.
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NEWS
April 17, 1997 | PAUL DEAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In its final upheaval, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics went from evil empire to easygoing garage sale. And as Warsaw Pact profiteers met American entrepreneurs, their desperation for dollars collided with our instincts for collectibles. Suddenly, surplus MiG-15 fighters were disarmed and disassembled, resold and restored. And reassigned to the friendlier skies of Arizona and California. Peter the Great Coat Co. in Minneapolis is selling jackets worn by Moscow street sweepers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1990
Tickets to board two Soviet warships visiting San Diego Aug. 1 to Aug. 4 will be made available by the U.S. Navy on Tuesday. The tickets will be offered from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Navy/Marine Mobile Recruiting van adjacent to the main entrance of San Diego Jack Murphy Stadium. The tickets, available on a first-come-first-serve basis, will be limited to four per family. A U.S. Navy surface combatant ship will also be available for touring.
NEWS
May 31, 1993 | ROBERT SEELY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With 30 members of his crew standing at attention, Capt. Igor Emshin watched the Russian ensign, a blue cross on a white field, hoisted over his Black Sea Fleet ship Sunday. In most navies, raising your national symbol is unremarkable. But here in Sevastopol, where the Russian ensign is forbidden, the action is tantamount to mutiny against the Ukrainian government. The 37-year-old captain and 161 other ship commanders like him have ignored Ukraine's orders and hoisted the St.
NEWS
April 12, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet navy said Tuesday that it will try to recover the nuclear-powered experimental submarine that caught fire and sank in the Norwegian Sea last week with the loss of 42 lives. Vice Adm. Sergei P. Vargin, head of the Soviet northern fleet's political department, said that, although a governmental commission is now investigating the accident, the navy wants, in the interest of safety, to know what caused the fire and a series of subsequent explosions and to see how much of the submarine remains intact.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1990 | EILEEN SONDAK
Fifty Soviet sailors will be singing and dancing around town this week. But this group won't be doing it just for fun. They're participating in a series of tightly orchestrated outdoor public performances in San Diego and Coronado. The 50-member Soviet Song and Dance Ensemble of the Pacific Fleet, and the Soviet band that accompanies it, sailed into San Diego Tuesday morning, just one component in a historic visit by three Soviet navy vessels to this once-forbidden territory.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1990 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Navy officials are puzzling over allegations by a petty officer that she was raped by a Soviet sailor after she boarded one of the visiting warships last week. The 26-year-old third class petty officer told authorities she was touring the Soviet destroyer Admiral Vinogradov when she was sexually assaulted about 8 p.m. last Tuesday, the day the three Soviet ships arrived for the first such visit to the West Coast in more than 100 years.
NEWS
July 16, 1988 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
To the north of this tiny port on the Soviet border is the Barents Sea, and an important shift in Soviet naval strategy is reportedly under way there. Senior Norwegian and NATO officers believe that the Soviet navy is pursuing a new "Arctic strategy," repositioning its missile submarines in the Barents Sea far from the North Atlantic and the U.S. coastline.
NEWS
December 12, 1985
Adm. Sergei G. Gorshkov, 75, who commanded the Soviet navy for 29 years and built it into a powerful armada of nuclear submarines and warships, has been replaced by Adm. Vladimir N. Chernavin, 57, according to a report in the Defense Ministry newspaper Red Star. Chernavin has been one of two deputies to Gorshakov and is considered a specialist in submarine warfare.
NEWS
April 25, 1988 | Reuters
The commander in chief of the Soviet Navy proposed today that the Soviet Union and the United States cut their naval forces in the Mediterranean to 15 warships and 10 support vessels each. The proposal by Fleet Adm. Vladimir Chernavin, reported by the official Tass press agency, expanded on a three-point plan announced by Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev last month to ease tensions in what he called an explosive region.
NEWS
February 21, 1992 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of the two largest aircraft carriers ever designed by the mighty Soviet military is being put on the auction block. For a mere $100 million down--the balance is negotiable--an aspiring naval power can buy the Varyag, now under construction, a ship the Pentagon has described as "a dramatic leap forward in technical fleet air defense capability."
NEWS
November 17, 1991 | From Associated Press
Jane's Defense Weekly says it has the first photographs seen in the West of a sonar-evading "stealth" submarine that defense experts regard as the Soviet navy's most modern secret weapon. The British military affairs magazine said Friday that the submarine, the Beluga, was photographed in the Black Sea port of Sevastopol on Nov. 3. It is believed to be the only one of its kind in service with the Soviet navy.
NEWS
October 15, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 10 years, Sergei Kushpetovsky loyally served the Motherland, rising to the rank of captain in the Soviet army. Then eight months ago, the unthinkable happened--the Motherland fired him. "I gave everything I had to the country and got nothing back," Kushpetovsky said. "I have a family to support, and they didn't give me a kopeck to live on."
NEWS
July 26, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The commander in chief of the Soviet navy announced Thursday that the number of vessels in his country's fleet will be cut by between 20% and 25% within the next decade, the official Tass news agency reported. Adm. Vladimir N. Chernavin, however, said that the Soviet fleet--one of the world's largest--will maintain defensive sufficiency despite the cuts. "Combat capabilities of the navy will be maintained thanks to the qualitative renewal of all branches of the service," Chernavin told Tass.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1990 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Navy officials are puzzling over allegations by a petty officer that she was raped by a Soviet sailor after she boarded one of the visiting warships last week. The 26-year-old third class petty officer told authorities she was touring the Soviet destroyer Admiral Vinogradov when she was sexually assaulted about 8 p.m. last Tuesday, the day the three Soviet ships arrived for the first such visit to the West Coast in more than 100 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1990 | RICHARD A. OPPEL JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER
As three Soviet naval vessels steam for home, both the U.S. and Soviet Union are investigating allegations that a female U.S. Navy petty officer was sexually assaulted on one of the ships about 8 p.m. Tuesday, just hours after the ships arrived at San Diego Naval Station. "(Friday) morning we learned that allegations were made by a female petty officer who said she had been sexually assaulted on board one of the Soviet ships while they were in port," Cmdr. Doug Schamp, a U.S.
NEWS
August 20, 1986
The Soviet Union has apparently completed a naval exercise in waters to the north of Japan that was among the largest conducted by its Pacific Fleet in recent years, Pentagon officials said. The officials said the largest ships observed during the weeklong exercise appeared to be sailing for ports on the eastern Siberian coast. The maneuvers, disclosed by Pentagon officials Aug. 12, involved more than 15 surface warships and at least 15 submarines, the officials said.
NEWS
August 5, 1990 | RICHARD A. OPPEL JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Authorities from both the United States and the Soviet Union are investigating allegations that a female U.S. Navy petty officer was sexually assaulted on one of three visiting Soviet navy ships on Tuesday, only hours after the ships arrived at San Diego Naval Station. "(Friday) morning we learned that allegations were made by a female petty officer who said she had been sexually assaulted on board one of the Soviet ships while they were in port," Cmdr. Doug Schamp, a U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1990 | From The Associated Press and
The Navy said Friday it is investigating allegations made by a sailor who said she was sexually assaulted aboard one of three Soviet ships on a goodwill visit in San Diego. "It's important to note that at the current time there is just an allegation of sexual assault," a U.S. Navy spokesman said. "There is a joint review to determine if there is any basis for the allegations."
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