Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSoviet Occupation
IN THE NEWS

Soviet Occupation

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 25, 1988 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
Imagine if the Soviets occupied Santa Catalina and this community were Long Beach. Or if Russians came to Nantucket Island and Martha's Vineyard 43 years ago, deported the locals to Cape Cod and announced they were staying--forever. In fact, they are dug in at about that distance from here.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 27, 2001 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Masses of refugees on the move and American soldiers who may have to go to war face a hidden menace in Afghanistan: millions of buried land mines. In the best of times, as many as 10 people step on mines in Afghanistan each day. However, as an estimated 1 million Afghans flee their homes, experts fear that many more people will be maimed or killed by weapons they can't see.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1987 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
There are two "Amerikas." One is the ABC miniseries that begins tonight. The other is the fictive specter that, sight unseen, has hit an American political nerve throbbing through 40 years of Cold War atmospherics. What if it really happened? What if, 10 years down the line, American postage stamps read "The United States of Soviet Socialist Republics?" What would our political system be? How would our economy work? What would make up our cultural and social life?
NEWS
August 24, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few months after Estonia won independence from the Soviet Union in 1991, the people of this historic border town held a referendum to secede from their new country and reunite with Russia. Fortunately for the town, the attempt failed, and today residents are trying to forget it ever happened. As Narva's prosperity rises with the rest of capitalist Estonia, the townsfolk can look across the Narva River to the seedy Russian town of Ivangorod and see the dismal life they escaped.
NEWS
August 24, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few months after Estonia won independence from the Soviet Union in 1991, the people of this historic border town held a referendum to secede from their new country and reunite with Russia. Fortunately for the town, the attempt failed, and today residents are trying to forget it ever happened. As Narva's prosperity rises with the rest of capitalist Estonia, the townsfolk can look across the Narva River to the seedy Russian town of Ivangorod and see the dismal life they escaped.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1986 | PATT MORRISON, Times Staff Writer
It was May, 1980, and the KGB was looking for Vladas Sakalys. The KGB, it seemed, was always looking for Vladas Sakalys, except for the 15 years when it had him in prison camps in Siberia, near Moscow or in his Lithuanian homeland. Sakalys, who now works at a Los Angeles electronics company, said his run-ins with the KGB began when he was 13. His father had been a Soviet Army "collaborator," and Sakalys' schoolmates dared him to prove his Lithuanian loyalty.
NEWS
May 31, 1990 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Flanked by dozens of submachine gunners in business suits in a decaying movie theater surrounded by tanks and soldiers, Afghan President Najibullah took the stage this week to convince the world that his harsh, Soviet-backed regime has seen the light of democracy.
NEWS
July 29, 1986 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev announced Monday that six regiments of Soviet troops will be pulled out of Afghanistan by the end of this year. Western military experts said the promised withdrawal of 6,000 to 10,000 of the estimated 115,000 Soviet troops in Afghanistan would not have any military importance. Soviet forces have been in Afghanistan since late 1979, supporting the Marxist government in Kabul against insurgents.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1986 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Nothing lasts like a stereotype. Women from Boston had been looking at a big TV screen showing satellite pictures of women from Leningrad, and vice versa. "I'm noticing," a Boston woman told her Soviet counterparts, "that a lot of you look kind of sad and depressed." The American woman had seen only what she wanted to see, for in reality the pictures from Leningrad contained as many happy faces as the pictures from Boston.
NEWS
May 27, 1987 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
Old-timers remember this as a lively, playfully irreverent city. Once, street urchins had a standard greeting for Westerners strolling down the market lanes: "Hey, Mr. Katchalu, " they would shout. That means "Mr. Potato" in the local Dari language. The nickname dates back two centuries to the Europeans who introduced potatoes to this remote Central Asian land ringed with mountains. But it is no longer heard on the streets of Kabul.
NEWS
July 6, 1990 | From Reuters
East Germany's defense minister said Thursday that tension is rising between impoverished Soviet troops based in the country and increasingly resentful local people. Never much loved by ordinary East Germans, Soviet troops now face the unrestrained resentment of people fed up with decades of noisy exercises, troop movements and low-flying military aircraft.
NEWS
May 31, 1990 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Flanked by dozens of submachine gunners in business suits in a decaying movie theater surrounded by tanks and soldiers, Afghan President Najibullah took the stage this week to convince the world that his harsh, Soviet-backed regime has seen the light of democracy.
NEWS
April 2, 1990 | DARRELL DAWSEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 1,000 Lithuanian activists thronged outside the Federal Building in Westwood on Sunday to protest increased Soviet pressure on their homeland to renounce its declaration of independence. As Lithuanian community leaders exhorted the Soviet Union to permit independence in the Baltic republic, demonstrators torched the Soviet flag, chanted anti-Gorbachev slogans and hoisted signs denouncing "Soviet occupation" of their country.
NEWS
November 25, 1988 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
Imagine if the Soviets occupied Santa Catalina and this community were Long Beach. Or if Russians came to Nantucket Island and Martha's Vineyard 43 years ago, deported the locals to Cape Cod and announced they were staying--forever. In fact, they are dug in at about that distance from here.
NEWS
May 27, 1987 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
Old-timers remember this as a lively, playfully irreverent city. Once, street urchins had a standard greeting for Westerners strolling down the market lanes: "Hey, Mr. Katchalu, " they would shout. That means "Mr. Potato" in the local Dari language. The nickname dates back two centuries to the Europeans who introduced potatoes to this remote Central Asian land ringed with mountains. But it is no longer heard on the streets of Kabul.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1987 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
There are two "Amerikas." One is the ABC miniseries that begins tonight. The other is the fictive specter that, sight unseen, has hit an American political nerve throbbing through 40 years of Cold War atmospherics. What if it really happened? What if, 10 years down the line, American postage stamps read "The United States of Soviet Socialist Republics?" What would our political system be? How would our economy work? What would make up our cultural and social life?
NEWS
November 28, 1985 | RUTH RYON, Times Staff Writer
Michael Utter was hopeful when he read Saturday that formal talks on the withdrawal of Soviet troops from Afghanistan may begin soon. "Since the Soviets invaded at Christmas in 1979, wouldn't it be great to have peace there this Christmas?" he asked. "My fondest hope is to see an end to the suffering there." For five months now, he has spent about 16 hours a day thinking about that suffering.
NEWS
September 27, 2001 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Masses of refugees on the move and American soldiers who may have to go to war face a hidden menace in Afghanistan: millions of buried land mines. In the best of times, as many as 10 people step on mines in Afghanistan each day. However, as an estimated 1 million Afghans flee their homes, experts fear that many more people will be maimed or killed by weapons they can't see.
NEWS
July 29, 1986 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev announced Monday that six regiments of Soviet troops will be pulled out of Afghanistan by the end of this year. Western military experts said the promised withdrawal of 6,000 to 10,000 of the estimated 115,000 Soviet troops in Afghanistan would not have any military importance. Soviet forces have been in Afghanistan since late 1979, supporting the Marxist government in Kabul against insurgents.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1986 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Nothing lasts like a stereotype. Women from Boston had been looking at a big TV screen showing satellite pictures of women from Leningrad, and vice versa. "I'm noticing," a Boston woman told her Soviet counterparts, "that a lot of you look kind of sad and depressed." The American woman had seen only what she wanted to see, for in reality the pictures from Leningrad contained as many happy faces as the pictures from Boston.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|