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NEWS
April 21, 1989 | From United Press International
Andrei D. Sakharov, the outspoken nuclear physicist who spent six years in internal exile for challenging Soviet authorities on issues ranging from nuclear weapons to human rights, won a seat Thursday in the new Soviet Parliament, Tass said. In a brief dispatch, the news agency said the Nobel laureate won in a second round of voting after overcoming bureaucratic opposition within the Academy of Sciences, which was allotted 20 seats in the 2,250-member Parliament. Tass did not give the vote totals.
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NEWS
October 26, 1992 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lithuanians ventured from their unheated homes into cold, rainy streets Sunday to vote in their country's first post-Soviet parliamentary elections, which pit conservative former Communists against anti-Russia nationalists. Results were not available by late Sunday, but election officials said at least 70% of eligible citizens cast ballots.
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NEWS
July 5, 1989 | From Reuters
The Soviet Parliament rejected the government's nominee to head the state railway system today, the second sitting minister given the thumbs down in as many days. The Supreme Soviet approved four other government appointees but blocked the nomination of Nikolai Konarev, railroad boss since 1982, a day after throwing out the nation's chief of foreign trade.
NEWS
February 26, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One is a sharp-tongued army colonel who says that if he were Soviet president, he would show President Bush who's boss by putting Soviet strategic weapons on alert. A comrade belongs to a shady reactionary group that tried to overthrow the democratically elected government in the Baltic republic of Latvia. A third is committed to fighting for the rights of ethnic Russians in places where they are a minority and branded "Soviet occupiers."
NEWS
June 2, 1989 | From Reuters
The new Soviet Parliament was stunned today when a deputy suggested that Lenin's body be removed from Red Square and buried in Leningrad. Yuri Karyakin said the founder of the Soviet state, whose body is on display in a mausoleum in the square, had expressed the wish to be buried alongside his mother in Leningrad. "We have violated his political will and his last wish as a human being," said Karyakin, a writer. "Tanks drive through Red Square, shaking the body. If I believed in God or the existence of the immortal soul, I would be sure he would thank us."
NEWS
June 1, 1989 | From Reuters
The new Soviet Parliament moved today to probe whether the Baltic republics willingly joined the Soviet Union after historian Roy Medvedev and other deputies charged Moscow had forcibly annexed Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia and then doctored the truth. President Mikhail S. Gorbachev supported setting up a commission to probe whether secret clauses in a 1939 pact with Nazi Germany assigned the three Baltic nations to Moscow, paving the way for annexation a year later. Gorbachev also revealed that West Germany had failed to come up with the original of the secret portions of the 1939 nonaggression treaty, also called the Molotov-Ribbentrop pact, after he requested it from Chancellor Helmut Kohl.
NEWS
June 28, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
A former U.S. Navy intelligence analyst who committed suicide after spying for the Soviet Union was not a Soviet-born mole, the head of the KGB said today. "He was an American. It seems he was born in Indiana," KGB chief Vladimir Kryuchkov said of Glenn Souther, whose obituary appeared in the Soviet press Tuesday. Souther's adopted Russian name, Mikhail Y. Orlov, was used in his KGB obituary Tuesday in the Defense Ministry newspaper Krasnaya Zvezda, prompting speculation that he had been born in the Soviet Union.
NEWS
April 20, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The dispersal by riot troops of nationalist demonstrations in the southern Soviet republic of Georgia this month showed how the country's political reforms could be quickly ended, six deputies to the new, elected Soviet Parliament warned Wednesday. In an angry denunciation of the action as brutal, unjustified and threatening all political reform here, the lawmakers accused the troops of using a toxic gas against some youths and of beating and hacking at others with shovels to break up a peaceful demonstration in Tbilisi, the Georgian capital, on April 9. Twenty civilians were killed, according to government accounts, but Georgian political dissidents have put the figure at more than 36, with dozens of others missing.
NEWS
April 22, 1990 | from Associated Press
Moscow on Friday expanded its energy embargo on Lithuania to include certain shipments of food, metal and industrial parts in its continuing effort to crush the republic's independence drive, Lithuanians said. Dozens of Soviet soldiers also stormed a printing plant and beat civilian guards and a local legislator Friday, witnesses said. The Kremlin "is seeking to stop the plants, put the workers on the streets, and encourage social unrest," Lithuanian President Vytautas Landsbergis charged at a news conference Friday night.
NEWS
December 2, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev on Thursday won nearly unanimous approval from the Supreme Soviet, the national Parliament, for the new political structure that he is confident will turn the Soviet Union into a modern, socialist democracy.
NEWS
April 22, 1990 | from Associated Press
Moscow on Friday expanded its energy embargo on Lithuania to include certain shipments of food, metal and industrial parts in its continuing effort to crush the republic's independence drive, Lithuanians said. Dozens of Soviet soldiers also stormed a printing plant and beat civilian guards and a local legislator Friday, witnesses said. The Kremlin "is seeking to stop the plants, put the workers on the streets, and encourage social unrest," Lithuanian President Vytautas Landsbergis charged at a news conference Friday night.
NEWS
February 28, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, wanting greater authority to promote his reforms, Tuesday pushed through the Supreme Soviet a proposed constitutional amendment providing for a new, U.S.-style presidency over objections by liberals that the position would be far too powerful.
NEWS
February 17, 1990 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Another crack appeared in the once unified face of the Soviet Communist Party here Friday when a group of deputies representing almost 20% of the Supreme Soviet, or Parliament, announced they had banded together to fight what they described as nationalist threats to the integrity of the country.
NEWS
January 25, 1990 | From Associated Press
Negotiators today reached an agreement calling for a cease-fire along a border separating heavily armed camps of Armenian and Azerbaijani nationalists, Tass press agency said. Tass said the cease-fire was declared by members of the Soviet Parliament, the Armenian All-National Movement and the People's Front of Nakhichevan.
NEWS
December 22, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
A Lithuanian lawmaker today challenged the Kremlin in front of the entire Soviet Parliament to begin talks leading to full independence for his Baltic republic. Lithuania "was forcibly included in the Soviet Union," said Deputy Kazimeras Motieka. If the Kremlin is serious about reform, he said, it should move to eliminate the results of the crimes of dictator Josef Stalin, who annexed the Baltic region.
NEWS
August 10, 1989 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
It surprised Western cynics, occasionally traumatized Communist Party officials and provided some of the best late-night television entertainment seen here in a long time. But most of all, the just concluded premiere session of the revitalized national legislature served notice that after decades of being run exclusively from the top down, the system of government here has undergone a fundamental change.
NEWS
December 22, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
A Lithuanian lawmaker today challenged the Kremlin in front of the entire Soviet Parliament to begin talks leading to full independence for his Baltic republic. Lithuania "was forcibly included in the Soviet Union," said Deputy Kazimeras Motieka. If the Kremlin is serious about reform, he said, it should move to eliminate the results of the crimes of dictator Josef Stalin, who annexed the Baltic region.
NEWS
January 6, 1989 | From Reuters
Soviet human rights activist Andrei D. Sakharov was nominated Thursday as a candidate for elections to a new Parliament that will replace the existing Supreme Soviet. Sakharov, 67, winner of the 1975 Nobel Peace Prize, was chosen to stand in March for one of the 75 seats reserved for scientists in the new Congress of People's Deputies, which will elect from its members a new Supreme Soviet to sit in permanent session.
NEWS
July 24, 1989 | From Reuters
Widespread strikes by Soviet miners are "a scream of despair," a member of the Supreme Soviet Parliament declared today in a startlingly frank debate televised across the country. Kremlin leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev, who listened patiently to the entire debate, acknowledged that the walkouts had struck "a serious blow to the economy."
NEWS
July 5, 1989 | From Reuters
The Soviet Parliament rejected the government's nominee to head the state railway system today, the second sitting minister given the thumbs down in as many days. The Supreme Soviet approved four other government appointees but blocked the nomination of Nikolai Konarev, railroad boss since 1982, a day after throwing out the nation's chief of foreign trade.
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