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June 2, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Days after nyet- ing a Soviet broadcast of the controversial miniseries "Amerika," Russian television finally got around to airing ABC's "The Day After" Friday. The film depicted the results of a nuclear exchange on Lawrence, Kan.
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NEWS
July 15, 1988 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, Times Staff Writer
It was high noon in San Ardo, a scorched little crossroads between Santa Barbara and Monterey. A bunch of bikers were under the one stand of shade trees in sight, cans of beer in hand, tinkering with their motorcycles. Black caps, sleeveless black T-shirts, leather chaps, tattoos and a week's growth on their faces, they looked mean. Out of nowhere came Alexei Shaskolski and Alexander Raskin, two Soviets from Leningrad, with their friends, Ron and Pat Herson of Los Angeles.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Late Thursday afternoon--just after promoter Bill Graham thanked his Soviet hosts and guitarist Carlos Santana waxed eloquent about the "harmony, health, trust (and) joy" surrounding the scheduled Fourth of July American/Soviet pop concert in Moscow--Graham became furious when one Soviet televison reporter requested and received 150 press passes, and the pop mogul threatened to cancel the show.
NEWS
July 9, 1987 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, Times Staff Writer
The American-Soviet peace march ended here Tuesday after a dramatic meeting with refuseniks, dissidents and others out of favor in Soviet society. Like much of the two-week trek from Leningrad to Moscow, the final day's events pointed up that this is an exciting and upredictable moment in Soviet history. Over the quietly stated protest of the official Soviet co-sponsor and with the tacit consent of the American sponsors, individual walkers invited the unexpected guests.
NEWS
April 7, 1987 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, Times Staff Writer
Plans are proceeding for a walk by 400 Americans and Soviets from Leningrad to Moscow this summer as a demonstration of opposition to the arms race, according to Allan Affeldt, president of International Peace Walk Inc., the American organizing group for the march. The walk, patterned after the Los Angeles-to-Washington peace march by 500 activists last year, is jointly sponsored by the Soviet Peace Committee.
NEWS
July 5, 1987 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, Times Staff Writer
The world's first joint rock concert by U.S. and Soviet performers took place at Ismailovo Stadium here on American Independence Day, a seven-hour event produced by San Francisco impresario Bill Graham and conducted under a blanket of heavy security. Yet a laid-back attitude prevailed among music lovers, and the concert ended with a rousing performance by Carlos Santana that set the crowd to dancing, with a few fans riding on the shoulders of others in precarious, two-tier maneuvers.
NEWS
July 15, 1988 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, Times Staff Writer
It was high noon in San Ardo, a scorched little crossroads between Santa Barbara and Monterey. A bunch of bikers were under the one stand of shade trees in sight, cans of beer in hand, tinkering with their motorcycles. Black caps, sleeveless black T-shirts, leather chaps, tattoos and a week's growth on their faces, they looked mean. Out of nowhere came Alexei Shaskolski and Alexander Raskin, two Soviets from Leningrad, with their friends, Ron and Pat Herson of Los Angeles.
NEWS
July 9, 1987 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, Times Staff Writer
The American-Soviet peace march ended here Tuesday after a dramatic meeting with refuseniks, dissidents and others out of favor in Soviet society. Like much of the two-week trek from Leningrad to Moscow, the final day's events pointed up that this is an exciting and upredictable moment in Soviet history. Over the quietly stated protest of the official Soviet co-sponsor and with the tacit consent of the American sponsors, individual walkers invited the unexpected guests.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1988 | RICK SHERWOOD, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Julian Lennon, Peter Gabriel and U2 will be among the Western acts performing March 25-27 in Moscow's 30,000-seat Olympic stadium in anti-drug concerts sponsored by the Soviet Peace Committee, organizers have confirmed. The concerts, which will include performances by Soviet musicians, will benefit a United Nations fund to fight drug abuse, said organizer Vitaly Korotich, editor of the weekly news magazine Ogonyok.
NEWS
July 5, 1987 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, Times Staff Writer
The world's first joint rock concert by U.S. and Soviet performers took place at Ismailovo Stadium here on American Independence Day, a seven-hour event produced by San Francisco impresario Bill Graham and conducted under a blanket of heavy security. Yet a laid-back attitude prevailed among music lovers, and the concert ended with a rousing performance by Carlos Santana that set the crowd to dancing, with a few fans riding on the shoulders of others in precarious, two-tier maneuvers.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Late Thursday afternoon--just after promoter Bill Graham thanked his Soviet hosts and guitarist Carlos Santana waxed eloquent about the "harmony, health, trust (and) joy" surrounding the scheduled Fourth of July American/Soviet pop concert in Moscow--Graham became furious when one Soviet televison reporter requested and received 150 press passes, and the pop mogul threatened to cancel the show.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Days after nyet- ing a Soviet broadcast of the controversial miniseries "Amerika," Russian television finally got around to airing ABC's "The Day After" Friday. The film depicted the results of a nuclear exchange on Lawrence, Kan.
NEWS
April 7, 1987 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, Times Staff Writer
Plans are proceeding for a walk by 400 Americans and Soviets from Leningrad to Moscow this summer as a demonstration of opposition to the arms race, according to Allan Affeldt, president of International Peace Walk Inc., the American organizing group for the march. The walk, patterned after the Los Angeles-to-Washington peace march by 500 activists last year, is jointly sponsored by the Soviet Peace Committee.
NEWS
August 20, 1987 | From Reuters
Mother Teresa of Calcutta arrived today on her first visit to the Soviet Union and said she hopes her nuns, who care for the poor in 77 countries, will be allowed to work in the Soviet Union. The 76-year-old Nobel Peace Prize winner, a guest of the Soviet Peace Committee, is the third prominent religious figure to visit the country this summer.
NEWS
August 27, 1994
Robert Rozhdestvensky, 62, a prominent poet in the former Soviet Union whose words were often set to music. His first poem was published in 1941 when he was 9 years old, and his first collection of poems, "Flags of Spring," was published 15 years later. In the 1960s, he became prominent when leading Soviet composers--Alexandra Pakhmutova, Arno Babadzhanyan, Boris Mokroysov, David Tukhmanov, Yan Frenkel, Oskar Fetsman and Nikita Bogoslovsky--composed songs to his verses.
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