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NEWS
July 5, 1986 | United Press International
U.S. Ambassador Arthur A. Hartman, delivering a televised Independence Day message to the Soviet people, said Friday the United States remains committed to improving bilateral relations and a summit meeting between superpower leaders. He also had praise for the Statue of Liberty as a symbol of the American belief in "free movement of peoples, free expression and the chance to achieve a better life."
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NEWS
March 25, 2007 | Erika Niedowski, Baltimore Sun
Yekaterina Tkalenko brushes her teeth three or four times a day -- especially after enamel-insulting tea or coffee. She has them professionally cleaned twice a year and carries floss as if it were as vital as an inhaler. She recently spent nearly $1,000 to have her teeth whitened. "When I look at a person, no matter who it is, the first thing I look at is his or her teeth and their smile," said the 34-year-old Muscovite, who works in the tourism industry.
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NEWS
January 1, 1991 | From Associated Press
In a videotaped New Year's greeting to "all the wonderful people of the Soviet Union," President Bush offered encouragement Monday to a beleaguered Mikhail S. Gorbachev, saluting the Kremlin leader and his people for undertaking "an arduous journey" toward a new society. The President, welcoming the Soviets as partners in the Persian Gulf crisis, hailed the U.S.-Soviet "common approach to a new challenge in the name of stability and peace."
OPINION
May 12, 2005 | MAX BOOT, Max Boot is a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations.
Goose-stepping soldiers. Hammers and sickles. That was some spectacle in Red Square to commemorate the 60th anniversary of V-E Day. Like his communist predecessors, Russian President Vladimir V. Putin isn't shy about claiming for his country an outsized share of the credit for defeating Nazi Germany. No one can gainsay the sacrifices of the Soviet people. I should know. Both of my grandfathers served in the Soviet armed forces and survived the war. They were lucky.
NEWS
December 23, 1987 | United Press International
President Reagan taped a New Year's message to the Soviet people today to be shown on television in Russia on the holiday, a White House spokesman said. Marlin Fitzwater said Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev is taping a reciprocal message for the holiday and U.S. television networks are being asked if they will air it. Fitzwater said it is up to the networks and "if they don't want to do it, they don't have to."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1991
The world may have to wait for the courtroom confessions or eventual memoirs of the key plotters in this week's attempted coup in the Soviet Union to get clearer insights into what caused their conspiracy to fail--and fail so ignominiously. Whatever the explanations, the dramatic and uplifting fact of their defeat is now there for all to see. And the consequences are likely to be far-reaching.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1988 | ALAN H. LUXENBERG, Alan H. Luxenberg is the associate director of the Foreign Policy Research Institute in Philadelphia.
Hopes for a summit-time strategic-arms-reduction agreement have been dashed--in part by the rise of an unlikely coalition of Senate Democrats and Republicans who have grown wary of a Republican President in too much of a hurry to sign agreements with the Soviets. Will wonders never cease?
OPINION
September 1, 1991 | Alex Alexiev, Alex Alexiev writes frequently on Soviet and Eastern European affairs
The last great European empire is no longer. Gone with it are also the last vestiges of communist totalitarianism--a murderous utopia that claimed tens of millions of victims in the past 70 years. We should bid it good riddance and look to the future with hope. For whatever the post-Soviet political and economic reality looks like, in the long-run it is certain to be a vast improvement for the Soviet peoples and the world beyond.
NEWS
January 2, 1986 | MICHAEL WINES and WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writers
President Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev began the new year Wednesday with historic, televised peace appeals directed at the American and Soviet people. Reagan, in a five-minute address carried by the Soviet state television network, made no direct mention of Afghanistan and other sore points in U.S.-Soviet relations, but emphasized that "there is much work to be done" before the two nations can enjoy genuine peace.
NEWS
December 4, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the first payoff from his weekend summit with President Bush came when they sat down Sunday afternoon for the first joint press conference by U.S. and Soviet leaders in more than four decades of such summits. The message that the televised press conference sent back to viewers in Moscow was that Soviet-American relations are on a new basis--friendlier, more cooperative and no longer confrontational.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1992
Enough already of the rhetoric about the failure of Soviet socialism. How about some historical facts? 1. The 1917 Bolshevik revolution that threw off the yoke of the czar was hardly an experiment by ivory-tower idealists. It was a necessary revolt of workers and peasants led by women in bread lines whose families were starving. 2. Lenin and Trotsky, leaders of the Russian Revolution, fought for democratic socialism (a planned economy to benefit society) under workers' control and full rights for women and national minorities.
OPINION
December 29, 1991
The United States celebrated Christmas last Wednesday. Russia, Ukraine and the rest of the new Commonwealth of Independent States, following the Orthodox church calendar, will celebrate the same holiday Jan. 7. But what kind of Christmas will it be this year? On Jan. 2, prices in Moscow are expected to triple. The sweet taste of freedom will fight with the bitter taste of hunger. Since December, 1990, the United States has given $2.
NEWS
November 24, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is a popular new diet in the Soviet Union this winter, but it's not likely to catch on elsewhere: a loaf of bread three times a day, supplemented by two pounds of potatoes. "On our income, that's all we can afford to buy," said Yakov Shvolansky, a 72-year-old retiree, as fellow pensioners nodded in solemn agreement. "Meat? I haven't tasted meat in a year."
NEWS
November 12, 1991 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Larissa sits alone at the bar of the Intourist Hotel. She is 20, with long chestnut hair and the face of a Ukrainian madonna. She is also a hard-currency prostitute who sells her body to strangers for valuta --dollars, deutschemarks, lira and yen.
NEWS
October 1, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 32 pupils in Mrs. Sidneva's third-grade class listened with rapt attention Monday as she described how Nazi soldiers shot more than 30,000 people in two days 50 years ago in a wooded area on the edge of Kiev. "The Nazis hated all of us--the Ukrainians, the Russians and the Byelorussians--but who did they hate the most?" Inna M. Sidneva asked the 8- and 9-year-olds sitting erect at their desks. Several hands shot up, and the teacher motioned to a boy sitting in the front row.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1991
The will and determination of the Soviet people give all of us great inspiration. But their power to overcome that crumbling government behemoth raises an issue that gnaws at the value of a 50-year U.S. commitment. Most agree that the people were sufferers of lifetimes of a communist indoctrination which was legally sanctioned and enforced throughout every institution from schools to the workplace. But somehow they were they able to see through the lies to the values of a democratic society.
NEWS
November 12, 1991 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Larissa sits alone at the bar of the Intourist Hotel. She is 20, with long chestnut hair and the face of a Ukrainian madonna. She is also a hard-currency prostitute who sells her body to strangers for valuta --dollars, deutschemarks, lira and yen.
NEWS
November 3, 1987 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev told the Soviet people Monday that Josef Stalin committed "enormous and unforgivable" crimes in the 1930s, and he announced that a top-level commission has been set up to investigate them and exonerate their victims. At the same time, Gorbachev praised Stalin's decision to collectivize farming and proceed with rapid, state-controlled industrialization despite the "excesses" and widespread suffering they caused.
NEWS
September 9, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For nearly 20 years, Alexei Aleinikov has been a driver. He drove buses, trucks and chauffeured cars here despite his philosophy degree from Leningrad University, his Communist Party membership and the chance to preach the benefits of Marxism to schoolchildren and factory workers.
OPINION
September 1, 1991 | Alex Alexiev, Alex Alexiev writes frequently on Soviet and Eastern European affairs
The last great European empire is no longer. Gone with it are also the last vestiges of communist totalitarianism--a murderous utopia that claimed tens of millions of victims in the past 70 years. We should bid it good riddance and look to the future with hope. For whatever the post-Soviet political and economic reality looks like, in the long-run it is certain to be a vast improvement for the Soviet peoples and the world beyond.
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