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Soviet Proposal

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NEWS
October 6, 1991 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the gathering rush toward drastically reduced nuclear arsenals, the Soviet Union on Saturday matched President Bush's radical cuts in short-range weapons and then went several steps further. Soon afterward, the White House issued a statement saying that President Bush "responded positively to President Gorbachev's steps in picking up on the President's initiative."
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NEWS
December 14, 1991 | JOHN M. BRODER and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States, expressing concern that Soviet nuclear weapons could be sold to hostile forces overseas, has made "very, very concrete proposals" to four nuclear-armed Soviet republics on ways to block any unauthorized exports of weaponry or technology, a senior State Department official said Friday.
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NEWS
October 30, 1985 | ELEANOR CLIFT, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration on Tuesday dismissed as "inequitable and unacceptable" a Soviet proposal to stop construction on a radar station in central Siberia if the United States would forgo plans to modernize radar devices in Britain and Greenland. The Soviet offer was the latest in a series of informal probes to test Washington's willingness to compromise before the Nov. 19-20 summit between President Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev.
NEWS
November 2, 1991 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration and congressional leaders agreed Friday to use up to $1 billion from the defense budget for humanitarian aid to the Soviet Union and for a controversial plan to help the Soviet military convert to civilian activities. The deal was nailed into a compromise $291-billion defense authorization bill that both houses of Congress are expected to approve and President Bush has promised to sign, despite conservative protests against the Soviet aid plan. Sen. Sam Nunn (D-Ga.
NEWS
February 19, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, in a surprise attempt to avert a fast-approaching ground war between Iraq and U.S.-led forces, delivered his own peace plan to a top Iraqi official on Monday. Although details of the proposal were not immediately available, Soviet spokesmen said the plan is "fully in line" with United Nations demands for unconditional withdrawal of Saddam Hussein's troops from Kuwait, promising at the same time that the state of Iraq will survive.
NEWS
February 20, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Tuesday threw cold water on the new Soviet peace plan, saying "it falls well short of what would be required" to end the Gulf War. His remarks--the first he has made in public on the secret proposal--appeared to dismiss what was seen as the last chance to avoid a brutal war on the ground to throw Iraq's occupying force out of Kuwait.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1985
I find the secretary of state's rejection of the Soviet proposal for a moratorium on nuclear weapons testing disheartening. Certainly, the stockpiling of 50,000 nuclear weapons now in existence has not brought either side closer to the goal of peace and security. A moratorium on nuclear explosions would be a meaningful first step toward slowing and reversing the nuclear arms race. A unilateral Soviet moratorium in nuclear explosions could be seen as a confidence-building measure to bolster the talks in Geneva while a simultaneous test ban treaty is currently being negotiated.
NEWS
December 24, 1987
Jordan's King Hussein, concluding a three-day visit to the Soviet Union, said that Kremlin policy in the Persian Gulf is "constructive," but he declined to endorse a Soviet proposal to deploy a U.N. naval force there. When asked whether he supported proposals for a U.N. force, Hussein said one would be welcome once the gulf war was over and the presence of foreign warships was unnecessary.
NEWS
April 24, 1985 | Associated Press
The North Atlantic Treaty Organization on Tuesday formally rejected a Soviet proposal for a mutual freeze on deployment of medium-range nuclear missiles in Europe, a senior American official said. Richard R. Burt, assistant secretary of state for European and Canadian affairs, said NATO will make no counterproposal in response to the Soviet offer of April 7.
NEWS
June 22, 1990 | From Associated Press
The Soviet Union said today that a united Germany can join NATO after a five-year transition period during which all Soviet and U.S. troops would leave the country. The United States rejected the proposal. The proposal was outlined by Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze during international talks in East Berlin on the strategic future of a united Germany. The remarks indicate that a united Germany would be free to join the Western NATO alliance after a five-year transitional period.
NEWS
October 6, 1991 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the gathering rush toward drastically reduced nuclear arsenals, the Soviet Union on Saturday matched President Bush's radical cuts in short-range weapons and then went several steps further. Soon afterward, the White House issued a statement saying that President Bush "responded positively to President Gorbachev's steps in picking up on the President's initiative."
NEWS
March 12, 1991
MOSCOW In Moscow, there was one last effort to avert a land war. President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, alerted by Soviet intelligence that George Bush was ready to open the allied ground offensive, began some of the most intense diplomacy of the war. Gorbachev summoned his most trusted officials, a Kremlin crisis group that Yevgeny M. Primakov, his top Middle East adviser, describes as "men who understand each other at half a word." He ordered Primakov to return to Baghdad.
NEWS
February 21, 1991 | DAVID LAUTER and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A massive ground attack against Iraqi troops grew imminent Wednesday as time began to run out on Soviet efforts to mediate a peaceful withdrawal of Saddam Hussein's troops from Kuwait. Iraqi radio announced that Foreign Minister Tarik Aziz will travel to Moscow "soon" to deliver Hussein's response to Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's peace proposal. But allied officials dismissed such talk as a "desperate" attempt by Iraq to "buy time" to avert a total defeat.
NEWS
February 20, 1991 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Orange County congressman just back from the Soviet Union charged Tuesday that hard-line Communists, frightened at the potential loss of another client state, are behind a Kremlin peace proposal whose real intent is to keep Saddam Hussein in power and preserve Soviet influence in the Middle East. Rep.
NEWS
February 20, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Tuesday threw cold water on the new Soviet peace plan, saying "it falls well short of what would be required" to end the Gulf War. His remarks--the first he has made in public on the secret proposal--appeared to dismiss what was seen as the last chance to avoid a brutal war on the ground to throw Iraq's occupying force out of Kuwait.
NEWS
February 19, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, in a surprise attempt to avert a fast-approaching ground war between Iraq and U.S.-led forces, delivered his own peace plan to a top Iraqi official on Monday. Although details of the proposal were not immediately available, Soviet spokesmen said the plan is "fully in line" with United Nations demands for unconditional withdrawal of Saddam Hussein's troops from Kuwait, promising at the same time that the state of Iraq will survive.
NEWS
October 1, 1985 | DON COOK, Times Staff Writer
After a weekend barrage of criticism from Washington, the Soviet Union on Monday formally placed on the bargaining table its proposal to reduce nuclear arsenals by up to 50%. The presentation took place in a brief meeting of U.S. and Soviet arms control negotiators at the American delegation's headquarters. A second meeting was scheduled for today at the Soviet Mission to determine whether the proposal provides the basis for negotiations. Viktor P.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1987
President Reagan sadly declined a recent Soviet proposal to bring the United Nations to bear in the Persian Gulf troubles (Part I, Sept. 24). It was a ploy, the President said, by Russia to become a "player" in the gulf. "Playing" indeed seems to be what the President is intent on doing. Lots of posturing and bluster. Reflagging foreign ships so we can argue endlessly with the irrational Iranians over who shot at what. "Punishing" China for doing exactly what we did a year ago: sell arms to Iran.
NEWS
January 31, 1991 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
The new U.S.-Soviet peace proposal for the Persian Gulf "contains exactly the elements" of a plan that drew "harsh criticism" from the Bush Administration when French President Francois Mitterrand advanced it four months ago, French Ambassador Jacques Andreani said Wednesday. Andreani, apparently puzzled by the U.S.
NEWS
June 23, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The six-nation German reunification talks approved some elements of a final settlement Friday but bogged down over a Soviet attempt to limit the powers of a united Germany. The "two-plus-four" negotiations among the foreign ministers of the two German states and the four victorious powers of World War II also set a goal of completing their work by November, although officials cautioned that much remains to be done.
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