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December 14, 1989 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A delegation of top Soviet scientists, led by the chief negotiator at the strategic arms reduction talks in Geneva, will arrive Friday in Orange County for a unprecedented tour of a sensitive "Star Wars" research facility near San Clemente. The Soviets' two-day visit to Southern California will be shrouded in secrecy. Except for a brief picture-taking session when the 10-member delegation touches down at the U.S.
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BUSINESS
May 27, 1992 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For roughly the annual salary of a single American scientist, American Telephone & Telegraph has hired 100 Russian researchers at a prestigious Moscow physics institute, the company said Tuesday. Separately, Corning Inc. said it had signed a similar deal involving 100 scientists at two research centers in St. Petersburg. The agreements are part of an accelerating effort by U.S.
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NEWS
July 15, 1986 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
Soviet scientists are planning to install seismic equipment in the United States to monitor underground nuclear tests in Nevada under a privately arranged U.S.-Soviet effort, a private American environmental organization disclosed Monday. The agreement, which appeared to catch the Reagan Administration by surprise, was announced in Moscow, where a team sponsored by the Natural Resources Defense Council has been installing seismic monitors near a Soviet nuclear test site.
NEWS
March 31, 1992 | Associated Press
Two programs to attract former Soviet scientists, placing at least 150 in universities and another 150 with research firms, were announced Monday by the State Department. The scientists will be placed in entry-level jobs for one to two years as visiting scholars. They will begin arriving in time for the fall semester, said Margaret Tutwiler, the department spokeswoman. The schools will underwrite most of the $1 million program. The U.S.
NEWS
January 19, 1985 | From Reuters
Twenty-five scientists from the United States, the Soviet Union and other countries will meet at the Vatican next week to debate what risks the world might face from a war in space. The scientists, who will be joined by four Roman Catholic clergymen, will meet for four days under the auspices of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences and submit a report to Pope John Paul II, Academy President Carlos Chagas said.
NEWS
May 1, 1988 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Evgeni P. Velikhov, a top arms control adviser to Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev, somberly studied an erratic seismograph, then allowed himself an impish grin. "Ah," he teased several American observers standing next to him. "The Soviets are watching." The Soviets were indeed watching Saturday, using seismic monitoring devices to detect and classify a relatively small blast of conventional explosives detonated 130 miles away in the Nevada desert near Broken Hills.
NEWS
August 17, 1988 | United Press International
For the first time in the 43-year history of the Atomic Age, Soviet scientists today had front-row seats at the Nevada Test Site to record and monitor the detonation of a U.S. nuclear weapon. A nuclear bomb a dozen times more powerful than the one that leveled Hiroshima on Aug. 6, 1945, was exploded 2,000 feet below the barren Nevada desert at 10 a.m. Helicopters and airplanes circled the area to check for radiation leaks.
NEWS
December 14, 1988 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II and LEE DYE, Times Science Writers
The U.S. and Soviet academies of science Tuesday announced the formation of a new joint committee on global ecological concerns whose mission, they said, rivals in importance that of the panels exploring arms reductions. "Both (the ecology panel and arms committee) are addressing the most important problems that influence the survival of mankind," said Academician Igor Makarov, scientific secretary of the Academy of Sciences of the Soviet Union.
NEWS
March 31, 1992 | Associated Press
Two programs to attract former Soviet scientists, placing at least 150 in universities and another 150 with research firms, were announced Monday by the State Department. The scientists will be placed in entry-level jobs for one to two years as visiting scholars. They will begin arriving in time for the fall semester, said Margaret Tutwiler, the department spokeswoman. The schools will underwrite most of the $1 million program. The U.S.
NEWS
April 6, 1988 | United Press International
American and Soviet scientists announced today that they will be working jointly on simulated nuclear explosions in the Nevada desert to test capabilities in verifying a ban on underground weapons testing. The private, non-government experiment will be conducted later this month by representatives of the Natural Resources Defense Council, a nonprofit environmental protection organization, and the Soviet Academy of Sciences.
NEWS
February 15, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chief scientist of the top-secret laboratory that once designed Soviet nuclear bombs appealed to Secretary of State James A. Baker III on Friday for money to keep his staff at home and at work on peaceful projects. Yevgeny N. Avrorin said the scientists, some scraping for enough money to feed their families, did not want handouts or make-work jobs.
NEWS
January 24, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration is preparing an initiative to ensure full employment for an estimated 2,000 nuclear scientists in the former Soviet Union, including U.S.-funded jobs overseeing the destruction of Soviet atomic weapons and a multinational effort to provide jobs in civilian research institutes, officials said Thursday.
OPINION
August 25, 1991 | Robert Scheer, Robert Scheer is a reporter for The Times. He interviewed Roald Sagdeyev by telephone from his office at the University of Maryland
It was in October, 1988, midway in the history of Soviet perestroika , that Roald Sagdeyev sat alone in the Supreme Soviet of the U.S.S.R. and cast the sole vote in opposition to legislation authorizing the formation of new paramilitary forces. Those same units would later be used in violent clashes with civilians in Soviet Georgia and Lithuania. Soviet President Mikhail S.
BOOKS
July 21, 1991 | Ed Regis, Regis is the author of "Great Mambo Chicken and the Transhuman Condition: Science Slightly Over the Edge."
Longtime Carl Sagan fans will recognize the name Iosif Shklovsky from the book that the two of them collaborated on in the 1960s, "Intelligent Life in the Universe." Shklovsky, a Russian astronomer, was one of the first scientists to take the subject of extraterrestrial intelligent life seriously. His new book, "Five Billion Vodka Bottles to the Moon," is a posthumously published, Richard Feynman-style memoir of Shklovsky's further adventures in Soviet science.
NEWS
March 24, 1991 | CLAUDIA COATES, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Even as the number of Americans with advanced technical education is dwindling, thousands of emigre scientists and mathematicians from the Soviet Union are underemployed or on welfare. Their problems, social workers say, are that they don't speak English well, are middle-age and over-qualified, and many of them haven't grasped the nuances of job-hunting in the United States.
NEWS
November 27, 1990 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three hours by boat from shore, in a top-secret zone of Lake Ladoga, rests a half-sunken ship that Soviet authorities say could one day pose a terrifying threat to this city and even to the Baltic Sea beyond. The vessel, a German minelayer from World War II, is filled with radioactive wastes from experiments ordered in the 1950s by the ruthless head of dictator Josef Stalin's secret police, Lavrenti V. Beria. Although there is no evidence of contamination so far, the fear is that as the ship's hull rusts, there may be radioactive leaks into the lake, which supplies Leningrad's water system and also feeds into the Baltic.
NEWS
August 16, 1988 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
American and Soviet scientists, in unprecedented cooperation at one of the most sensitive U.S. defense facilities, are preparing to demonstrate ways to verify compliance with unratified nuclear test-ban treaties signed in the mid-1970s. The technicians, working together at the Nevada Test Site since April, have been sharing information and technology aimed at verifying compliance with the 1974 Threshold Test Ban and 1976 Peaceful Nuclear Explosions treaties.
NEWS
December 14, 1989 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A delegation of top Soviet scientists, led by the chief negotiator at the strategic arms reduction talks in Geneva, will arrive Friday in Southern California for an unprecedented tour of a sensitive "Star Wars" research facility near San Clemente. The Soviets' two-day visit to Orange County will be shrouded in secrecy. Except for a brief picture-taking session when the 10-member delegation touches down at the U.S.
NEWS
April 29, 1990 | RAY FORMANEK JR., ASSOCIATED PRESS
U.S. scientists are examining bits of leg muscle removed from high-flying rats as part of a joint NASA-Soviet experiment to determine how injured astronauts would heal in a weightless environment. "Our hypotheses go everywhere from disaster to normal healing," said William Stauber, a physiologist at West Virginia University Medical Center and one of two scientists conducting the study.
NEWS
February 10, 1990 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not long ago it would have been too preposterous an idea for any but the most far-fetched of romantic novels: The granddaughter of a former American President marrying a top Soviet space scientist and friend of the country's Communist Party chief. But the world has been turned on its head since then, and Friday, an idea too outlandish for fiction became fact. Susan Eisenhower, 38, granddaughter of the late Dwight D. Eisenhower, married Roald Z.
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