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NEWS
January 7, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with increasing economic problems and growing ethnic unrest, Soviet society is shifting markedly to the right, the chairman of the Soviet Parliament said Sunday, acknowledging a conservative resurgence after nearly six years of political reforms. Anatoly I. Lukyanov, chairman of the Congress of People's Deputies, said that "the demand for order and stability" has become a national priority and that the country's politics will have to reflect it.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 15, 2004 | Maria Danilova, Associated Press Writer
Afflicted with severe cerebral palsy, Ruben David Gonzalez Gallego was separated from his mother as a baby and shunted off into the grim world of Soviet orphanages. Yet somehow he survived, found his mother after 30 years and launched a career as a writer -- an endeavor that recently won him the prestigious Russian Booker Prize for "White on Black," a heart-wrenching account of his travails.
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NEWS
April 17, 1986 | ROBERT W. GIBSON,, Times International Economics Correspondent
When I left the Soviet Union in January of 1960, after a tour of duty as a correspondent, my Russian acquaintances were beginning to have expectations. They sensed change. I don't know how "the masses" felt. In Soviet society, it was hard to tell. But things seemed to be looking up. That was my final impression before coming back more than a quarter of a century later. Now, even Russians ask how it used to be "back then." "What changes have you found?"
OPINION
August 18, 2003 | Mark Kurlansky
Thirty-five years ago, on Aug. 20, 1968, Anton Tazky -- a secretary of the Slovak Party Central Committee and a personal friend of Czechoslovakian Communist Party chief Alexander Dubcek -- was driving back to Bratislava from an outlying district. He noticed odd, bright lights in the distance, and as he drove closer, he realized he had been seeing the headlights of tanks and military trucks with soldiers in foreign uniforms at the wheels. A movie shoot, Tazky decided.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1988 | Associated Press
Editors of a Soviet newspaper said Friday that they were irresponsible in publishing a letter supporting dictator Josef Stalin. Soviet Russia, the organ of the Russian Republic's Communist Party and government, published its public confession in an editor's note accompanied by readers' letters and a historian's article. All 10 letters condemned Stalinism, which was supported in a letter the newspaper printed March 13 from a Leningrad teacher.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1988
At best Charles T. Powers' article ("Moscow--Long Lines, Shabbiness," Part I, April 29) is irresponsible journalism. At worst it is consciously malicious. The article contains nothing new. There could not be one Times reader who is not thoroughly familiar with the hackneyed stereotypes of Soviet lines, shortages and inefficiency. Why run the article? We decry Pravda's slanted coverage of capitalism's unemployment, crime, homelessness, but how is this any different? Like Pravda, Powers describes only part of a complex reality.
NEWS
February 7, 1988 | From Reuters
Nikolai V. Talyzin, the head of the powerful Soviet State Planning Commission who was criticized by Kremlin leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev last June, has been transferred to another government post, Tass news agency reported Saturday. Analysts cautioned, however, that it is too soon to evaluate the significance of the move. Tass said Talyzin, 59, had been appointed chairman of the ministerial-level Bureau for Social Development.
NEWS
November 10, 1987
The Soviet government announced that it is rewriting its criminal code to abolish internal exile as punishment, narrow the list of death penalty offenses and shorten the maximum prison term from 15 to 10 years. The proposed overhaul of the code by a government review committee was discussed by Justice Minister Boris V. Kravtsov in an interview with the official Tass news agency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1988 | ROBERT S. WISTRICH, Robert S. Wistrich is a professor of modern European history at Hebrew University in Jerusalem and the author of "Trotsky, Fate of a Revolutionary" (Stein & Day, 1981) and "Hitler's Apocalypse" (Weidenfeld, 1985) and other works
Things are changing fast in the Soviet Union. In the era of glasnost even such former non-persons as Nikolai I. Bukharin, Lev B. Kamenev and Grigory E. Zinoviev, victims of the bloody Moscow show trials of 50 years ago, have been rehabilitated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1988
Dov Zakheim's column ("U.S. Aid to Perestroika Could Make Soviet Economy Lean--and Military Mean, " Op-Ed Page, June 29) concludes that we should "avoid paying more than lip service to friend Gorbachev's commendable concern about his economy." However, his analysis contains at least two serious errors. First, he assumes that perestroika will enable the Soviets to field a better military, but that the Soviet society will not change in other ways. Yet the advent of computer networks, open dialogue (such as we have seen at the Party Congress)
BOOKS
December 26, 1999 | MICHAEL HENRY HEIM, Michael Henry Heim is a translator of Central European and Russian fiction and drama. He teaches in the department of Slavic languages and literature at UCLA
If you're interested in the mark that communism, especially its Russian variant, has left on the century, and if you've read Pasternak's "Doctor Zhivago" and Bulgakov's "Master and Margarita" on the cataclysmic, all but cosmic aspects of the Russian Revolution, you might want to have a look at the down-to-earth anatomy of everyday Soviet-style intrigue in Yuri Trifonov's "House on the Embankment" (1976).
OPINION
November 22, 1992 | Martin Walker, Martin Walker is the U.S. bureau chief, and former Moscow bureau chief, of Britain's Guardian
It is time to tear up the history books. The Cold War was not what we thought, and the heroes and villains are changing places with each new revelation from the Kremlin's dusty archives. Alger Hiss was innocent, and the young California congressman, Richard M. Nixon, built his anti-communist credentials on the good name of a guiltless man.
BOOKS
May 19, 1991 | Jane A. Taubman, Taubman, professor of Russian at Amherst College, is the author of "A Life Through Poetry: Marina Tsvetaeva's Lyric Diary" (Slavica) and co-author of "Moscow Spring" (Summit)
When Magnitogorsk was under construction in the 1930s, the huge steel-making complex, now the largest in the world, and the company town built alongside it were touted as the workers' future. The frightening thing about Magnitogorsk today is that it may be just that. The aging mills in this city of 438,000 at the southern end of the Urals turn out steel too low-grade to compete on the world market.
TRAVEL
March 24, 1991 | CHRISTINE DEMKOWYCH, Demkowych is a free-lance writer who has lived and worked as a journalist in the Soviet Union.
While traveling through the Soviet Union last fall, researching a book on lifestyles of the Soviet elite, I unexpectedly needed to catch a train from Moscow to Kiev. A sign declared that all tickets had been sold out, yet it was impossible not to notice empty seats on the train. Acting on a tip from a Soviet friend, I waited until no one was watching, then casually slipped the first train attendant I saw 50 rubles ($10) in small bills. In seconds I was waved inside.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When "Taxi Blues," the Soviet Union's candidate for the 1990 best foreign-language film Oscar, premiered in Moscow last summer, extra police had to be called in to hold back the crowd, and the pleading for spare tickets began more than a block from the October Theater. Footage of the premiere went straight onto the nightly news, and the ovation in the theater lasted long after the lights came up. A Soviet film sensation had been born.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1991 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Moscow of Pavel Lounguine's "Taxi Blues" (Friday at the Music Hall) is not one we've ever seen in quite this way. It's not the dour, political chessboard of Western spy movies, or the staunch proletarian capital of old Soviet films. Instead, this sensational new Soviet-French co-production gives us a volatile city, with something anarchic loose in the works. TV billboards tower over the streets, fireworks blaze, illicit booze flows. Fights erupt explosively, sex is rapacious.
OPINION
November 13, 1988
Sen. Steve Symms (R-Ida.) only sees "undisciplined, gratuitous underwriting of Soviet global operations" when our allies provide new bank credits that will help Mikhail Gorbachev begin satisfying consumer demands. What Symms fails to see is that satisfying Soviet consumer demand is in the interest of U.S. national security. Our national security will be imperiled if Gorbachev fails in his effort to restructure Soviet society. A failure would give Soviet hard-liners the chance to take control, returning to a repressive regime.
NEWS
December 19, 1986 | United Press International
Pravda today blamed former Soviet leader Leonid I. Brezhnev for many of the Soviet Union's economic ills and accused him of exaggerating accomplishments during his nearly two decades in power. In a rare personal attack on a past Soviet leader, the Communist Party daily said Brezhnev's rule was characterized by "a lack of consistent democratism and broad openness." Brezhnev led the Soviet nation from 1964 until his death in 1982.
NEWS
January 7, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with increasing economic problems and growing ethnic unrest, Soviet society is shifting markedly to the right, the chairman of the Soviet Parliament said Sunday, acknowledging a conservative resurgence after nearly six years of political reforms. Anatoly I. Lukyanov, chairman of the Congress of People's Deputies, said that "the demand for order and stability" has become a national priority and that the country's politics will have to reflect it.
NEWS
August 25, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Huddled under polyethylene to keep out of summer downpours, some of Soviet society's losers are now camped out near the Kremlin. For refugees fleeing deadly ethnic feuds, workers fired for speaking out and self-described victims of the Communist Party and the KGB, this is the last resort. From the flimsy tents pitched on a sward near St. Basil's Cathedral, they emerge to plead their apparently hopeless causes to anyone willing to listen.
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