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Soviet Soldiers

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NEWS
July 30, 1990 | Associated Press
Soviet soldiers have been appearing recently at rest stops on East German highways asking travelers for bread, chocolate and cigarettes, a newspaper reported Sunday. The Berliner Morgenpost, a West Berlin newspaper, said the soldiers' appearances at autobahn rest stops were the result of drastic price rises in East Germany after the July 1 economic merger of the two Germanys. Prices also rose at Red Army commissaries, the newspaper said.
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OPINION
January 27, 2013 | By Allan Chernoff
"Happy birthday!" my mom and her first cousin will wish each other on Sunday, even though neither was born on Jan. 27. Rather, it's the anniversary of their new lease on life, of the day the Soviet Red Army liberated them from behind the barbed wire of Auschwitz-Birkenau in 1945. My mom, Rena Margulies Chernoff, was 11 then, and her cousin Frieda Tenenbaum was 10. They were among the very few children who somehow survived the infamous death camp, where more than a million people - mostly Jews, including more than 200,000 children, but also gays, Poles, Soviet prisoners of war, Roma and Sinti (Gypsies)
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NEWS
February 15, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Lt. Gen. Boris Gromov, commander of Soviet forces in Afghanistan, became the last Soviet soldier to leave the embattled country when he crossed into the Soviet border town of Termez at 9:55 a.m Moscow time today, the official Soviet news agency Tass reported. Today was the deadline for troop withdrawal under a U.N.-sponsored accord designed to end the nine-year Soviet intervention in Afghanistan.
NEWS
September 7, 2011 | Emal Haidary, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
I come from a country that has been at war for as long as I've been alive, but I had never touched a gun until I came to Los Angeles. As a 30-year-old Afghan, I'd seen plenty of guns: the Soviet soldiers with their AK-47s, the nervous American kids pointing their weapons at you, ready to shoot, thinking everyone around them is a bomber. But here in Los Angeles, visiting on a five-month journalism fellowship, I was the one doing the shooting. For fun! America, I discovered, is a land of freedom.
NEWS
April 5, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
About 50 armed Soviet soldiers dressed as police officers stormed the Lithuanian Prosecutor's Office today, expelled its employees and occupied the building, said witnesses and spokesmen for the republic's Parliament. The incident occurred one day after Lithuania's secessionist government accused the Kremlin of backing forces bent on its overthrow. Elsewhere in the Baltic, a KGB officer said security forces have increased surveillance of fishing boats to prevent arms shipments to the republic.
NEWS
August 17, 1991 | Associated Press
Armenian militants Friday released three of the 41 Soviet servicemen they are holding hostage in the disputed Nagorno-Karabakh region of Azerbaijan, the official Tass news agency reported. The Interior Ministry soldiers were seized earlier this week near the village of Aterk by militants demanding the release of 16 Armenians detained in the last 3 1/2 months of civil unrest in the Caucasus mountain region.
NEWS
May 19, 1988 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
The wife of one soldier wore her wedding dress Wednesday so her husband could easily spot her in the crowd and see that her love was just as strong as the day he left for Afghanistan eight months ago. An elderly Red Army veteran, campaign medals decorating the front of his suit coat, wept uncontrollably throughout the two-hour patriotic ceremony at a massive reviewing ground constructed for the occasion on the banks of the big, muddy Amu Darya River.
NEWS
April 10, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Soviet soldiers seized a driving school in Vilnius, the Lithuanian capital, and President Vytautas Landsbergis expressed fears that the takeover could mark new Kremlin retaliation against his republic, which declared independence last year. He said a protest will be lodged with the Kremlin. The Soviet army plans to use the school for training recruits.
NEWS
November 24, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Three soldiers were killed and 126 people injured in a new wave of ethnic riots in the southern Soviet republic of Azerbaijan, officials there reported Wednesday. A state of emergency has now been declared around the towns of Kirovabad and Nakhichevan, curfews have been imposed there and more troops have been sent to quell the growing disturbances and to maintain order elsewhere in the republic, they said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2005 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
Naum Sapozhnikov got his first taste of combat during the Battle of Stalingrad. "It was the most terrible experience of my life," Sapozhnikov said. "The Germans started to bomb. Everything was on fire. It was unbelievable." He was then just 22, eager to defend Mother Russia. In the end, he and his comrades prevailed. The battle marked a turning point in World War II, halting the Nazi offensive and destroying much of Hitler's army.
OPINION
February 27, 2005
I read the Feb. 20 commentary, "A Soviet Memorial Etched by Ambiguity," with particular interest and have a few suggestions. When the citizens of West Hollywood erect their Soviet memorial, may I suggest that a memorial also be erected to the millions of victims of Soviet terror who were slaughtered with the help and complicity of the Red Army. Perhaps West Hollywood could erect a memorial to the Polish Katyn Forest victims, shot in the back of the head and dumped in a ditch in the woods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2005 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
Naum Sapozhnikov got his first taste of combat during the Battle of Stalingrad. "It was the most terrible experience of my life," Sapozhnikov said. "The Germans started to bomb. Everything was on fire. It was unbelievable." He was then just 22, eager to defend Mother Russia. In the end, he and his comrades prevailed. The battle marked a turning point in World War II, halting the Nazi offensive and destroying much of Hitler's army.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2000
Re "A Serious Case of Mistaken Identity," Commentary, June 22: Benjamin Schwarz makes some good points about American hubris and the oft-slighted Soviet role in World War II, but he is way off base even "possibly" crediting Josef Stalin with the victory. Stalin's partnership with Hitler started the war in the first place, and his self-serving actions and inexcusable negligence brought his country to the brink of disaster. Stalin was a monkey on the back of Soviet soldiers, who never knew when they or their families back home might be the next victims of one of the bloodthirsty dictator's murderous whims.
NEWS
April 26, 1994 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One afternoon in 1985, while he was listening to an East German band tooting out a bit of Dixieland jazz, Torgau resident Guenter Schoene was hit by what he thought was a brilliant idea. Wouldn't it be a fine thing, he mused, to put on an international jazz festival in Torgau, right on the old stone bridge that spans the Elbe River there?
NEWS
July 21, 1992 | JOHN BOUDREAU, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Vladislav Tamarov stares down a street lined with upscale art galleries and restaurants. He lights a cigarette that will burn to a nub. Then he will have another and another. "I was drafted at 19," he remarks. "I felt this was bad, and I was right." The 27-year-old Russian photographer has traveled far from Afghanistan, where he left his youth on the battlefields. In December, 1979, Soviet troops invaded Afghanistan. On Aug. 10, 1984, Tamarov arrived in Kabul to begin his two-year tour of duty.
NEWS
August 21, 1991
Estonia. A column of more than 100 light armored vehicles and trucks was reported to be on the move toward the Estonian capital, Tallinn. Latvia. Soviet soldiers seized control of Latvian broadcast studios and the central telephone exchange. One report said two people were wounded. Lithuania. President Vytautas Landsbergis called for acts of non-violent civil disobedience. Moldavia.
NEWS
March 5, 1986
Afghan rebels shot down three Soviet helicopters on successive days last month around Kabul, Western diplomats in Pakistan said. Four Soviet soldiers died in the crash of one of the copters. The diplomats also reported at least six unexplained explosions and exchanges of small-arms fire in the Afghan capital last week and said that two Soviet soldiers were killed earlier by a bazaar shopkeeper.
NEWS
February 13, 1989 | Associated Press
Developments Sunday as the Soviet Union moved to withdraw troops before Wednesday's deadline under U.N.-sponsored accord: Soviet soldiers handed over their last combat outpost, on edge of Kabul airport, to Afghan government troops. Soviet Foreign Ministry spokesman said that weather permitting, the remaining 6,000 Soviet soldiers will be out by Tuesday. U.N. airlift of food, medicine and blankets to Afghanistan suspended after Ethiopia pulled out; Egypt dropped out last week.
NEWS
August 21, 1991 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I will never give a command to shoot against my own people, and I would never obey such a command." A cold rain dripped from the four gold stars decorating the uniform of the Soviet officer who dared to say these words but not to give his name, interviewed outside a sprawling Soviet army base in what, because of Mikhail S. Gorbachev, is no longer Communist East Germany.
NEWS
August 17, 1991 | Associated Press
Armenian militants Friday released three of the 41 Soviet servicemen they are holding hostage in the disputed Nagorno-Karabakh region of Azerbaijan, the official Tass news agency reported. The Interior Ministry soldiers were seized earlier this week near the village of Aterk by militants demanding the release of 16 Armenians detained in the last 3 1/2 months of civil unrest in the Caucasus mountain region.
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