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OPINION
August 6, 1989 | Alex Alexiev, Alex Alexiev is a senior analyst of Soviet affairs at the RAND Corp
Last week the new Supreme Soviet granted wide-ranging economic autonomy to Estonia and Lithuania (with Latvia soon to follow), a new watershed in Moscow's wrenching efforts to reform the decaying Soviet system. For reform-minded officials this decision represented a recognition of the Balts as trailblazers in the turbulent politics of perestroika and a welcome chance to use this small region as a laboratory for economic experimentation.
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WORLD
July 24, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
More than 20 bodies of people shot in the 1940s, almost certainly by the Soviet NKVD secret police, have been found in a church in northern Belarus, historians in the former Soviet state said. Yaroslav Bernyakovich, a local history enthusiast, said a youth group came across the bodies while exploring disused parts of a church in Glubokoye. The town was part of Poland between the World Wars but reverted to Soviet Belarus after Nazi and Soviet leaders divided up eastern European states in 1939.
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NEWS
October 1, 1993 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yevgeny Yevtushenko's poetry challenging the Soviet regime so inspired Russia's youth in the 1960s that his readings here filled the 100,000-seat Lenin Stadium to capacity. When the Voice of America reported his suicide one day, the Moscow police pleaded with him to appear on his balcony to calm a restive mob. How things have changed.
WORLD
April 3, 2008 | James Gerstenzang and Peter Spiegel, Times Staff Writers
NATO is unlikely to immediately put Ukraine and Georgia on a course toward membership, the group's spokesman said Wednesday night, dealing a setback to President Bush, who has pushed hard to expand the 26-nation alliance to include the two countries on Russia's southern flank that had been part of the Soviet Union.
NEWS
May 2, 1985 | Associated Press
A Soviet court gave a two-year suspended sentence to a Pentecostal preacher for writing poetry that slandered the Soviet state and social system, Keston College reported Wednesday. It said Vladimir Franchuk, 27, was arrested in November, 1984, in the Ukrainian city of Zhdanov. Keston College is a London-based organization that monitors religious dissidents in the Soviet Bloc.
NEWS
May 12, 1992
Military issues weigh heavily on the proposed agenda for a meeting in Uzbekistan's capital Friday of the leaders of the Commonwealth of Independent States, the loose alliance of 11 of the 15 former Soviet republics forged late last year as a successor to the Soviet state.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1988
Valeriy Asatiani, the minister of culture for the Soviet state of Georgia, flew to San Diego for two days of planning sessions for the festival. Although the festival is titled "Treasures of the Soviet Union," the focus is principally on the culture of Georgia. Asatiani, who met with Mayor Maureen O'Connor and city and arts officials during their Soviet tour this summer, will huddle with O'Connor and festival officials today.
NEWS
April 19, 1985
Britain ordered a Soviet diplomat and an Aeroflot employee expelled for "unacceptable activities," a diplomatic euphemism for spying. Capt. Oleg A. Los, 44, assistant naval attache, and Vyacheslav A. Grigorov, 37, a charter flight manager for the Soviet state airline, were given seven days to leave the country, a Foreign Office statement said. No details were given. The expulsions would bring to at least 12 the number of Soviets who have been expelled from Britain for similar reasons since
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1986
I commend The Times for the articles on the exhibition of Impressionist paintings loaned to us by the Soviet Union. I do, however, object to their being characterized as a "Soviet art exhibit." These paintings were created in France by Frenchmen before World War I, purchased by Russian pre-revolutionary art patrons, and confiscated by the Soviet state after the revolution in 1917. I think that it is important for us to realize that in the 70 years of its existence, the Soviet state has not managed to produce any art--written, painted or sculpted--that is worthy of being exhibited.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1987 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Soviet director Tengiz Abuladze suggested Wednesday that Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev's glasnost policy has millions of enemies, adding that well over half the population bitterly opposed it. As quoted in the Soviet weekly Moscow News, the director of "Repentance" said that Soviet state founder Vladimir Lenin's dictum about bureaucracy being the state's greatest enemy remains true today.
WORLD
April 2, 2008 | James Gerstenzang, Times Staff Writer
President Bush said Tuesday that he has told Russian President Vladimir Putin that Moscow has "nothing to fear" if former parts of the Soviet Union join NATO and that Russia should welcome cooperation on a U.S. missile defense network in Central Europe. After meeting with Ukrainian President Viktor Yushchenko in Kiev, Bush declared that he would not soften his support for bringing Ukraine and Georgia into NATO in exchange for Russia dropping its opposition to the missile defense network.
WORLD
February 1, 2006 | Amberin Zaman, Special to The Times
This nation has become one of the largest markets in the trafficking of women from nearby former Soviet states who have been forced into prostitution, with profits from the illicit sex trade in Turkey an estimated $3.6 billion last year and growing, an international agency said in a report released Tuesday. About 5,000 women, more than half from Moldova and Ukraine, are believed to be working as sex slaves in Turkey, an agency official said.
WORLD
September 8, 2005 | Maggie Farley and Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writers
An annual U.N. report on development released Wednesday shows that living standards in parts of the former Soviet Union and in sub-Saharan Africa have been declining steadily even as conditions elsewhere in the world have largely improved. Norway tops the index, which seeks to assess nations' economic development, dignity and quality of life. The United States is ranked 10th.
WORLD
March 26, 2005 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
The revolt in Kyrgyzstan that toppled Russia's strongest ally in Central Asia was the result of the latest in what analysts say is an astonishing and painful series of diplomatic missteps by Moscow. Three largely nonviolent revolutions over the last 16 months have all but eliminated Moscow's attempt to dominate the former Soviet states that were once part of its unquestioned empire. The sudden collapse of Kyrgyz President Askar A.
WORLD
February 22, 2005 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
This month, shortly after Ukraine's pro-Western president was sworn in, the nation's prosecutor-general launched an inquiry into reports that up to 20 nuclear-capable cruise missiles intended for transfer to Russia were instead sold to other countries, including Iran and China.
NEWS
April 11, 2004 | William J. Kole, Associated Press Writer
The new Europe lies tantalizingly close to Tamila Vasilchenko -- so close she can walk through a bleak border post to sell candy on a dusty roadside in neighboring Slovakia. Yet what soon will be the European Union's most far-flung corner might as well be an ocean away. Ukrainians such as Vasilchenko, 59, a retired teacher struggling on a meager pension, can cross over to Slovakia a few times a month, but they can't stay.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1989
Last week's bloody riots in Soviet Georgia so far pose no threat to the "San Diego Arts Festival: Treasures of the Soviet Union," according to Paul Downey, spokesman for Mayor Maureen O'Connor. The October-November festival is built chiefly around the culture of the Soviet state of Georgia. At least 19 died during last week's rioting, triggered by Georgian nationalists who have complained that the Soviet government is dominated by people of Russian descent. Festival organizers were assured last week by officials at the Soviet Embassy in Washington that "there is no point of concern for the festival," Downey said.
OPINION
May 19, 1991
In the past three years, the Soviet-Azerbaijani conspirators have repeatedly violated all civilized norms in the Caucasus. They have uprooted 200,000 Armenians living in Azerbaijan (the massacres of Sumgait and Baku are well known), and now they are doing the same with the 180,000 Armenians living in Karabakh (Part A, May 10-11). And Mikhail Gorbachev, whose hands are stained with Armenian blood, has the audacity to shamelessly claim his "choice for a fundamental democratic transformation of the Soviet state."
WORLD
September 17, 2002 | From Times Wire Services
Tens of thousands of protesters took to Ukraine's streets Monday in some of the largest such demonstrations in years, demanding that President Leonid D. Kuchma resign or call early elections. In Kiev, the capital, about 20,000 protesters from several opposition groups blocked the downtown area for hours, shouting, "Away with Kuchma!" Many marched to the presidential administration building, where they set up tents in heavy rain as night fell.
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