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June 2, 1990 | From a Times Staff Writer
' . . .We wanted someone to speak to the soul of the Soviet people.' --Valentin Lazutkin Television minister Robert H. Schuller will videotape once-a-month religious programs for Soviet national television for at least 12 months starting in September, it was announced this week in Washington.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
There She Is: Soviet television viewers are about to see the "Miss America Pageant" for the first time. Viacom Enterprises said Wednesday that rights to rebroadcast this year's contest have been sold to the Russian Television and Radio Company, which will put it on the air later this month or in early November.
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NEWS
December 13, 1990 | From United Press International
A popular television journalist known for his aggressive crime reporting was shot and wounded by a stranger who lured him to an isolated Leningrad park with a promise of explosive documents, Soviet media said today. Alexander Nevzorov, anchor of the daily "Six Hundred Seconds" news program from Leningrad, was shot at point-blank range late Wednesday.
NEWS
September 27, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During a recent interview on the Soviet Union's early-morning news show, the grandson of a man who had fought against the Bolsheviks in the early years of Soviet power uttered a sentence that, for most of the previous 73 years, might have landed him and the show's producers in Siberia or worse. "Lenin was a murderer," the interview subject said. Without flinching, the host went on to his next question.
NEWS
July 4, 1988 | From Reuters
Soviet television reported without commentary Sunday the downing of an Iranian airliner in the Persian Gulf. The United States has admitted downing the Iran Air jetliner by mistake. The evening news program Vremya also showed weeping relatives of passengers on the Iran Air A-300B2 Airbus waiting for news in Dubai. The Soviet news bulletin was broadcast at about the same time that President Reagan acknowledged that a U.S.
NEWS
September 19, 1987 | From Reuters
Staunchly anti-Communist Indonesia will broadcast television programs from the Soviet Union, the official Antara news agency said on Friday. Information Minister Harmoko told reporters after returning from a 10-day trip to the Soviet Union that he had signed an agreement to exchange programs. Harmoko said the Soviet television shows will be about economic and technological developments in the Communist nation. He did not say when they will start.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 1987 | From Reuters
President Reagan will make a major foreign policy speech Aug. 26 in Los Angeles on East-West themes, and the Kremlin will be invited to transmit it on Soviet television, the White House announced Saturday. Spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said Reagan will make the speech to a group called the Town Hall of California, then return to his ranch to continue his vacation. The address also will be televised live to a U.S.-Soviet conference at Chautauqua, N.Y.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
"Adam Smith's Money World," public television's weekly look at business, will run this fall on Soviet television, dubbed in Russian. "Adam Smith has come to the land of Karl Marx," said the show's host, George J. W. Goodman, who uses the name of the 18th-Century Scottish economist who outlined the workings of capitalism. Co Star, a Soviet company that produces and distributes films, will get the broadcast rights to "Money World" and sell advertising to U.S.
NEWS
July 20, 1988
An American citizen who defected to Moscow appeared on Soviet television to say he had left the United States after being harassed by the FBI. Glenn Michael Souther, a former Navy man, said he had been followed by FBI agents after returning to the United States following a stint abroad with the Navy. The FBI "blocked my future and restricted my freedom," Souther said in a statement broadcast on the evening television news program Vremya.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1988 | MARISON MULL
PepsiCo. says it has bought the first commercial time sold by Soviet television to a non-Soviet company. Five minutes of Pepsi commercials--two of which feature Michael Jackson in his first appearance on Soviet television--will air May 17-21 on the broadcasts of a five-part series, "Pozner in America."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1991 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Rev. Robert H. Schuller has received an invitation to become the first American to address the Soviet people on national television since the short-lived overthrow of the country's reform government, according to a spokesman for the Schuller ministry.
NEWS
July 28, 1991 | Associated Press
U.S. and Soviet negotiators on Saturday finished the last details of a treaty to slash arsenals of strategic nuclear weapons just days before it is to be signed at a summit in Moscow, Soviet television reported. President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev are scheduled to sign the treaty Wednesday in the Kremlin.
NEWS
June 1, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was sweet hell for Agdam Shaikramov, a bushy-haired crossword puzzle fan from Bashkiria, but his tribulations would give a video thrill to millions. In studio ASB-4 at Central Television's Ostankino complex, where a taping session was nearing its climax, the latest winner of the Soviet Union's No. 1 game show, "Field of Miracles," had been brought face-to-face with odd yet alluring objects from another world. Like a 12-cup Mr. Coffee coffee maker. A Hoover upright vacuum.
NEWS
May 5, 1991 | JAMES E. FOWLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite a 35-year run as a television preacher, George Vandeman is barely a household name even in Thousand Oaks, where he produces his Seventh-day Adventist show, "It Is Written." But Vandeman is about to score an international coup over such better-known American televangelists as Robert Schuller of Garden Grove's Crystal Cathedral and Pat Robertson, host of the "700 Club."
NEWS
April 27, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The television newsman who became one of the first faces of glasnost five years ago with candid programs discussing the failures of Soviet socialism has quit amid mounting fears that tightening state control of the broadcast media is again turning it into a political monopoly.
NEWS
December 13, 1990 | From United Press International
A popular television journalist known for his aggressive crime reporting was shot and wounded by a stranger who lured him to an isolated Leningrad park with a promise of explosive documents, Soviet media said today. Alexander Nevzorov, anchor of the daily "Six Hundred Seconds" news program from Leningrad, was shot at point-blank range late Wednesday.
NEWS
April 16, 1987 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State George P. Shultz, in remarks broadcast on Soviet television, accused the Soviet Union on Wednesday of "obsessive" spying on U.S. diplomats in Moscow. "You're always watching, you're always pressing," he said. "It gets to be so obsessive." With mild sarcasm, he praised Soviet technicians for the excellence of their eavesdropping work, saying: "I went through the new (U.S. Embassy) building, and I could see with my own eyes what you have done there.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1990 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Husband-and-wife TV team Vladimir and Natasha Maximov dream of becoming the Roone Arledge and Diane Sawyer of Soviet television. Seeing new opportunities in a recent decree regarding radio and TV issued by President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, they plan to launch their own network and eventually challenge the state-owned broadcasting network for home viewers. But over at state-run television in this Russian city on the Neva River, the mood is dismal.
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