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WORLD
June 29, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon and Kathleen Hennessey
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- The big convoy slowed down on a Soweto corner, and for just a second, President Obama, waving, was framed in the window of his bullet-proof limousine. The crowd surged forward, a cheer rang out. And that was Obama's Africa tour for the Soweto youth who were on the outside of the president's town hall-style meeting at the University of Johannesburg campus in Soweto on Saturday. Their stories of struggle, deprivation and broken families were doubtless harsher than those of the students inside.
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SPORTS
March 6, 2014 | By Kevin Baxter
A young soccer fan in South Africa got an unexpected thrill Wednesday when he got to meet Brazilian superstar Neymar and some of his teammates after they had polished off South Africa, 5-0, in an international friendly in Soweto. The boy managed to make it on to the pitch after the match and was swept up by nervous security guards. But Neymar, who scored a hat trick in the win, noticed the commotion and quickly intervened, grabbing the boy and bringing him over to meet some of his teammates.
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WORLD
December 6, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- On a street corner in Soweto, David Mohale sat in the warm summer sun Friday, remembering the life of the man who brought him freedom, the hero of the nation's anti-apartheid struggle, Nelson Mandela. He also thought of his youth, and his own mortality. "You see what I am. I'm old too. I can can go any time myself," said Mohale, 86. "He's waiting for me there. "I feel so much sorrow because he was a good man, who learned the people how to live together.
WORLD
December 10, 2013 | By Alexandra Zavis
More than 90 world leaders and tens of thousands of South Africans plan to pay their last respects to Nelson Mandela at a memorial service Tuesday in the Johannesburg township of Soweto. The gathering, part of 10 days of national mourning, takes place at the soccer stadium where the former president made his last public appearance, in 2010, at the final game of soccer's World Cup championships. Mandela died Thursday at the age of 95. Mandela was famous for bringing together people of all races, economic backgrounds and political persuasions, and his memorial is expected to do the same.
NEWS
October 13, 1986 | Associated Press
Thousands of students walked out of about 40 high schools in the black township of Soweto today in a coordinated school boycott, but there were no reports of incidents. Following the instructions on pamphlets distributed throughout Soweto, the students showed up at their schools, then walked out en masse. By 11 a.m. all middle and high schools in the township were deserted, said a local reporter who made a tour of the township.
NEWS
September 5, 1986 | Associated Press
Nine victims of political violence were buried in the black township of Soweto today, a day after clashes between residents and security forces enforcing a ban on mass funerals. A Johannesburg newspaper said today that eight people died in Thursday's violence. The government said there were some injuries but that no one was killed. Today's separate funerals were permitted by security forces after a group of black clergymen dropped plans to hold a mass burial at a later date.
WORLD
February 13, 2010 | By Robyn Dixon
If the gun hadn't jammed 16 years ago, the Methodist minister would not be alive. The messy chaos of refugees in his church in central Johannesburg would not exist. The crowd of people who sleep on the floor in his home would not have a place to lay their heads. The poor who wait at his door until midnight, or 2 a.m. or even 5 a.m. to talk to him would not be there. Their terrible stories would not be listened to. And the Rev. Paul Verryn would not carry their pain. But the gun did jam. :: To neighbors of the Central Methodist Church, Verryn is a pest, like one of those old ladies who collects hundreds of stray cats and makes the neighborhood stink.
NEWS
February 6, 1993 | Reuters
A policeman was killed Friday in Soweto in an attack blamed by police on black guerrillas, breaking a monthlong lull in political murders in South Africa's biggest black township. The Human Rights Commission monitoring violence said Soweto, home to more than 3 million blacks, was clear of political murders in January for the first time in more than 2 1/2 years.
NEWS
August 20, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Heavily armed security forces sealed off part of Soweto, Johannesburg's black ghetto, for four hours today, making house-to-house searches and frisking pedestrians whose hands they stamped with red-ink passes. In Bethal, about 90 miles east of Johannesburg, a black policeman threatened by a mob accusing him of collaboration with the white-minority government shot his way out of the crowd today, killing one man, police said.
NEWS
January 13, 1986 | United Press International
The Supreme Court today turned down black activist Winnie Mandela's bid to overturn a government order barring her from Johannesburg and the neighboring Soweto black township. In Cape Town, meanwhile, U.S. envoy Chester Crocker met with President Pieter W. Botha to discuss Namibian independence and deliver a personal letter from President Reagan. Mandela, known in black dissident circles as "the Mother of the Nation," was barred by a government order issued Dec.
WORLD
December 9, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Thousands of South Africans filed into the 94,000-seat soccer stadium in Soweto early Tuesday for the state memorial service of the nation's apartheid-struggle hero, Nelson Mandela. Low gray clouds and misty rain cast a somber mood, but the atmosphere in the stadium was joyful and exuberant, as the crowds sang liberation struggle songs, danced, ululated, whistled and blasted vuvuzelas - the plastic trumpets that South Africans blow at soccer matches and joyful occasions, waiting for the service to begin.
WORLD
December 8, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - When South Africa's national anthem swelled in the Regina Mundi church in Rockville, Soweto, on Sunday, retired teacher Liz Magubane was sure that somewhere, Nelson Mandela could hear them. “That was the time when I felt like crying. I had tears in my eyes,” she said. “There were times when I would stand up and move my body a little bit, and enjoy it,” added Magubane, a member of a Roman Catholic Church group known as the Sodality of St. Anne, which does charitable work, visits people in prisons and helps orphans.
WORLD
December 8, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Four American presidents, along with more than 60 other world leaders, will travel to South Africa this week to honor former President Nelson Mandela. One man who won't be there is the Dalai Lama, Tibet's spiritual leader. The Dalai Lama has been denied visas during previous efforts to travel to South Africa, reflecting the sensitivities of China, one of South Africa's most important trading partners. A spokesman for the Buddhist leader, Tenzin Taklha, said the Dalai Lama had no plans to attend, according to South Africa's head of public diplomacy, Clayson Monyela.
WORLD
December 7, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Members of Nelson Mandela's family spoke for the first time Saturday of their grief at losing a "great man, a pillar of the family," who was always humble, despite his global fame. Mandela's family, deeply sensitive about the intense global media interest in his upcoming funeral, is walking a difficult line between a need for privacy to grieve, and the sense that Mandela belonged to to the world. The family is deeply concerned about the possibility of photographs circulating of Mandela lying in state, according to a spokeswoman for the Government Communication and Information System.
WORLD
December 6, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- On a street corner in Soweto, David Mohale sat in the warm summer sun Friday, remembering the life of the man who brought him freedom, the hero of the nation's anti-apartheid struggle, Nelson Mandela. He also thought of his youth, and his own mortality. "You see what I am. I'm old too. I can can go any time myself," said Mohale, 86. "He's waiting for me there. "I feel so much sorrow because he was a good man, who learned the people how to live together.
WORLD
December 6, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- As many South Africans woke up to the news that Nelson Mandela had died, it was Mandela's fellow Nobel laureate who provided the most comforting words. Mandela's legacy,  Desmond Tutu said Friday, would carry on. The sun would continue to rise. "The sun will rise tomorrow, and the next day and the next. ... It may not appear as bright as yesterday, but life will carry on," the retired Anglican bishop said in a statement. "To suggest that South Africa might go up in flames -- as some have predicted -- is to discredit South Africans and Madiba's legacy,"  Tutu said, using Mandela's clan name, a term of affection and respect.
WORLD
December 6, 2013 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - His greatest impact was as a moral leader, but Nelson Mandela also left a legacy in diplomacy by helping popularize the use of international sanctions to pressure a government to change its policies. Since sanctions were imposed in an effort to end apartheid and bring down South Africa's white-minority government, they have been used hundreds of times, especially by Western countries. President Clinton, who ordered sanctions against Cuba, Libya, Iran and Pakistan, mused near the end of his second term that the United States had become "sanctions-happy.
WORLD
December 6, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
From European royal palaces to impoverished African townships, anti-apartheid hero Nelson Mandela was remembered Friday for his tireless fight against injustice and racism and celebrated for the better world he left behind. Former South African President Frederik W. de Klerk, with whom Mandela negotiated an end to the brutal racist regime in his homeland, recalled the man who succeeded him as head of state as "a force for reconciliation and social justice" to the end. "It was an honor for me to have been able to work with Mr. Mandela in the process that led to the adoption of the interim constitution and our first democratic elections in April 1994," De Klerk said in a statement of condolence.
NEWS
December 6, 2013 | By Vivienne Walt, guest blogger
It was always there, shimmering on the horizon out my bedroom window: Robben Island, a barren outcrop in the dazzling Atlantic Ocean and the world's most notorious prison. And from as far back as I can remember, there was one fact we knew about that patch of land: Nelson Mandela was there. To white South Africans like me, raised within the coddled stranglehold of apartheid, Mandela was not only an icon, as he's been described on TV networks across the world in the hours since his death Thursday.
WORLD
December 6, 2013 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - His greatest impact was as a moral leader, but Nelson Mandela also left a legacy in diplomacy by helping popularize the use of international sanctions to pressure a government to change its policies. Since sanctions were imposed in an effort to end apartheid and bring down South Africa's white-minority government, they have been used hundreds of times, especially by Western countries. President Clinton, who ordered sanctions against Cuba, Libya, Iran and Pakistan, mused near the end of his second term that the United States had become "sanctions-happy.
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