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Soweto South Africa

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The contrast and complexity of South Africa firmly hit home for Whoopi Goldberg after one particularly long day in Soweto, the hometown of 2 million blacks where she was shooting scenes for the film "Sarafina!" Goldberg was whisked from the township of chickens and dust and squatter shacks to a $10-million house just 20 minutes away, where she was feted at a reception by African National Congress President Nelson Mandela.
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NEWS
June 17, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is a sunny Saturday morning in South Africa's best-known black community, and things are hopping at the Dobsonville Mall. Long lines wait at the bank machines. Shoppers clog checkout counters at the supermarket, and families buy popcorn at the triplex cinema. Children with bright balloons celebrate a birthday in the steakhouse. Isabel Mlambo, 17, hangs out near Frankie's Pizza. "I'm meeting my friends," she says, a look of teenage ennui on her face.
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NEWS
June 17, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 1976 Soweto student uprising, which sparked a generation of black resistance to apartheid, was remembered on its 15th anniversary Sunday by thousands of South Africans, from the mother of the first young victim to the leader of the African National Congress. In the treeless Avalon Cemetery of Soweto, Dorothy Pietersen and two dozen friends huddled early Sunday near the grave of her son, Hector Pietersen.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The contrast and complexity of South Africa firmly hit home for Whoopi Goldberg after one particularly long day in Soweto, the hometown of 2 million blacks where she was shooting scenes for the film "Sarafina!" Goldberg was whisked from the township of chickens and dust and squatter shacks to a $10-million house just 20 minutes away, where she was feted at a reception by African National Congress President Nelson Mandela.
NEWS
February 13, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 27-year wait for a glimpse of Nelson R. Mandela grew frenzied Monday as school classrooms emptied in black townships around Johannesburg and about 35,000 people showed up at a soccer stadium in Soweto to welcome home the black nationalist leader. But the guest of honor didn't show up.
NEWS
December 6, 1988
South Africa plans to enlarge Soweto, the country's largest black township, by about 31,000 acres. The land, southwest of Johannesburg, is to be developed by the government and private builders for housing, agriculture and light industry, the Ministry of Constitutional Development said. About 2 million people live in Soweto, a center of protest against the white-led government.
NEWS
June 26, 1991 | Associated Press
Gunmen fired on a packed commuter train Tuesday in the black township of Soweto, killing six people and injuring 18, police said. Officers said they did not have a motive for the attack. But it was similar to several incidents on black commuter trains in the last year that were believed linked to factional fighting in the townships. Police spokesman Col. Tienie Halgryn said three of the injured were in serious condition after the 6 a.m. shooting.
NEWS
February 14, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nelson R. Mandela, returning Tuesday to a hero's embrace in South Africa's largest black township, told 120,000 cheering supporters jammed into a soccer stadium here that he had often dreamed in prison "of this day when I could come back to my home." "My return fills my heart with joy," the 71-year-old black nationalist said as he scanned the country's largest political rally in more than three decades.
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taverns were offering free beer "in honor of Comrade Mandela" in Soweto. "Free Mandela" T-shirts were marked down to fire-sale prices in Cape Town. Car horns blared in the night air, and hundreds of blacks and whites danced in the streets of South Africa on Saturday to celebrate the imminent release of black nationalist Nelson R. Mandela. "Tears came into my eyes and I got goose pimples when I heard," said Nicky Blumenfeld, a 27-year-old white art teacher in Johannesburg.
NEWS
October 6, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Police said Friday that they are lifting a 10-day-old nighttime curfew in the black township of Soweto because a sharp drop in political violence and crime make the restrictions no longer necessary. Police imposed the 9 p.m.-to-4 a.m. curfew Sept. 25 in Soweto and other nearby townships to halt black factional fighting around Johannesburg that has claimed 800 lives in the last two months.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, Scott Kraft is a Times staff writer based in South Africa
After all those years of talking about it, reading about it and boycotting it with his films, Spike Lee made the trek to South Africa, the storied symbol of black oppression. Lee spent four days in South Africa last week to shoot the closing scenes for "Malcolm X" in the streets of Soweto, the sprawling black township of 2.2 million people just outside Johannesburg.
NEWS
June 26, 1991 | Associated Press
Gunmen fired on a packed commuter train Tuesday in the black township of Soweto, killing six people and injuring 18, police said. Officers said they did not have a motive for the attack. But it was similar to several incidents on black commuter trains in the last year that were believed linked to factional fighting in the townships. Police spokesman Col. Tienie Halgryn said three of the injured were in serious condition after the 6 a.m. shooting.
NEWS
June 17, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 1976 Soweto student uprising, which sparked a generation of black resistance to apartheid, was remembered on its 15th anniversary Sunday by thousands of South Africans, from the mother of the first young victim to the leader of the African National Congress. In the treeless Avalon Cemetery of Soweto, Dorothy Pietersen and two dozen friends huddled early Sunday near the grave of her son, Hector Pietersen.
NEWS
October 6, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Police said Friday that they are lifting a 10-day-old nighttime curfew in the black township of Soweto because a sharp drop in political violence and crime make the restrictions no longer necessary. Police imposed the 9 p.m.-to-4 a.m. curfew Sept. 25 in Soweto and other nearby townships to halt black factional fighting around Johannesburg that has claimed 800 lives in the last two months.
NEWS
October 5, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the night curfew only minutes old, an armor-plated police Casspir rumbled out of its barbed-wire encampment for duty in the largest and most violent black township in South Africa. Maj. Steve Olivier and his riot officers hunkered down in the darkened vehicle, scanning the lights of Soweto through narrow, bullet-proof windows scarred by the gunfire and rocks of previous patrols.
NEWS
September 10, 1990 | From Reuters
Twenty-six people died during weekend violence in the black township of Soweto, half of them killed during a rampage by a gang that included whites with blackened faces, witnesses said Sunday. Elsewhere, nine people died in fighting rooted in the bitter rivalry between Nelson Mandela's African National Congress and supporters of the Zulu-based Inkatha Freedom Party, taking South Africa's weekend death toll to 35, police said.
NEWS
March 24, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III, his consciousness sharpened by a quick tour of South Africa's largest black township, said Friday that he is distressed by what he saw and is even more determined to push for an end to apartheid. After four days of intense diplomacy in the affluent, swimming-pool-studded neighborhoods of South Africa and neighboring Namibia, the trip through Soweto marked Baker's first look at the living conditions of southern Africa's majority black population.
NEWS
June 17, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is a sunny Saturday morning in South Africa's best-known black community, and things are hopping at the Dobsonville Mall. Long lines wait at the bank machines. Shoppers clog checkout counters at the supermarket, and families buy popcorn at the triplex cinema. Children with bright balloons celebrate a birthday in the steakhouse. Isabel Mlambo, 17, hangs out near Frankie's Pizza. "I'm meeting my friends," she says, a look of teenage ennui on her face.
NEWS
September 5, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Frederik W. de Klerk, the first white leader to promise blacks a vote in their country's future, paid a surprise visit to Soweto on Tuesday. He drew friendly crowds and even a serenade of "Viva Comrade De Klerk!" "Everywhere, I felt a tremendous reservoir of good will, which promises only good for the future," De Klerk told reporters after touring a hospital, a school, a business center and a home in the township of 2.2 million people on the outskirts of Johannesburg.
MAGAZINE
August 19, 1990 | Robin Wright
The road to Avalon, on the edge of sprawling Soweto, ends at a haunting field, an incongruous and lonely break from the surrounding slum. At dusk, the vast expanse appears to be a no-man's land of wild waist-high grass and weeds. While the rest of the black township outside Johannesburg bustles noisily with numbers it can no longer contain, the only sound across the unkempt Avalon field is the echo of dogs barking in the distance. It is an anonymous monument to recent South African history.
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