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Soweto

NEWS
March 25, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not every foreign tourist who visits this sprawling slum of tin-roof shacks and dirt-floor shanties wears three strands of gleaming pearls, a huge diamond brooch and prim white gloves. Nor are most guarded by riot police in tank-like armored vehicles, shotgun-toting sentinels in bulletproof vests and snarling German shepherds.
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NEWS
March 5, 1995 | Reuter
Britain's Queen Elizabeth II will visit Soweto and five other black townships during the first visit of her reign to South Africa later this month, Buckingham Palace said Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1995 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Is that thunder or gunfire in the not-distant-enough distance? An ominous rumbling punctuates the action in "Soweto's Burning," Ross Kettle's often gripping play about a young British woman living in South Africa in the midst of apartheid's violent death throes. The woman, a white dancer living in Johannesburg, befriends a deaf black man while her soldier boyfriend is away on duty. Joseph (Larry Whitt) operates the spotlight at a cabaret where Emma (Emily Ruiz) dances.
NEWS
March 18, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Frederik W. de Klerk, who will likely go down in history as this country's last white president, has not had an easy time recently campaigning for next month's democratic elections. He's been spat upon, hit in the neck with a small stone, grabbed in a headlock and drowned out by chanting crowds of angry blacks. A local paper has dubbed his effort "Mission: Impossible." His chief opponent, Nelson Mandela, has belittled him as a "weakling," a "leper" and "unstable."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1993 | PHIL GALLO, Phil Gallo is a frequent contributor to The Times.
When trumpeter Lester Bowie and the other members of the Art Ensemble of Chicago decided to work with a South African choir, they knew there would be more to it than a meeting in a studio. There would be rehearsals, but there would also be trips to the movies and restaurants, family gatherings and sharing experiences with wives and children. There was also the matter of finding a house.
NEWS
June 17, 1993 | From Associated Press
More than 1 million blacks boycotted work Wednesday, shutting down major cities on the anniversary of the 1976 student uprising against apartheid. Many businesses either closed or tried to make do with a skeleton staff of white workers, particularly in the larger cities of Johannesburg, Cape Town and Durban.
NEWS
February 6, 1993 | Reuters
A policeman was killed Friday in Soweto in an attack blamed by police on black guerrillas, breaking a monthlong lull in political murders in South Africa's biggest black township. The Human Rights Commission monitoring violence said Soweto, home to more than 3 million blacks, was clear of political murders in January for the first time in more than 2 1/2 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1992 | T.H. McCULLOH, T.H. McCulloh writes regularly about theater for The Times.
Children aren't born racist. As "South Pacific's" Lt. Cable sang: "You've got to be taught, before it's too late, before you are 6, or 7 or 8, to hate all the people your relatives hate. You've got to be carefully taught." "The parents mold you," says South African playwright Ross Kettle. "They give you up to the school system, and then they give you into the army. By that time, it's a very difficult process to cleanse that individual.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, Scott Kraft is a Times staff writer based in South Africa
After all those years of talking about it, reading about it and boycotting it with his films, Spike Lee made the trek to South Africa, the storied symbol of black oppression. Lee spent four days in South Africa last week to shoot the closing scenes for "Malcolm X" in the streets of Soweto, the sprawling black township of 2.2 million people just outside Johannesburg.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1992 | DON SNOWDEN
Anyone wondering why South African pop was dubbed "the indestructible beat of Soweto" would have found the answer during Mahlathini & the Mahotella Queens' show at At My Place on Wednesday. The 90-minute set by the creators of the vibrant mbaqanga style displayed an irrepressible, ebullient spirit.
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