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Soy Milk

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NEWS
October 28, 1999 | From Associated Press
Doing their grocery shopping, Anne and Steve Browning skipped the dairy case and instead plunked five cartons of soy milk into their cart. "We bought it because we kept hearing about how good it was for you," said Mrs. Browning. "We don't buy milk anymore." With the government now allowing food labels to tout soy's ability to lower cholesterol, a new surge of interest is expected, and not just in traditional such soy-based foods as tofu and soy milk.
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SCIENCE
March 12, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
A pilot study failed to show something many people believe - that drinking raw milk reduces the symptoms of lactose intolerance or malabsorption. The condition is common worldwide, and can lead to bloating, abdominal pain and diarrhea. But the specific prevalence of lactose intolerance is not known, the researchers from Stanford University said. Current coping strategies include not drinking milk, drinking lactose-free dairy products, taking lactase enzyme tablets and other behaviors, but none of those eliminate the symptoms, the researchers wrote.
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FOOD
June 24, 2009 | Betty Hallock
In the slightly cramped kitchen of Sona restaurant in West Hollywood, chef de cuisine Kuniko Yagi is standing over six bowls of tofu that she has made using three different methods in the interest of soybean curd experimentation. It's not that she hasn't already discovered a recipe for making her own tofu perfectly -- silky-smooth, creamy and luscious, with the fresh -- really fresh -- flavor of soybeans. But she's making a point.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2012 | By Gale Holland, Los Angeles Times
Today is the last day on Earth. Then again, if you're reading this, maybe not. Doomsday, predicted by Mayan cycle adherents for Dec. 21, didn't come after all. Well, not yet anyway. Depending on when you picked up this story, there may be hours to go. But if you're still with me, civilization as we know it hasn't collapsed and Los Angeles is still standing. This is good news, especially for me. Imagine my frustration on awakening to find that, instead of lolling on the beach, I was grinding out a column as the wandering planet Nibiru/ tsunami/ hyperinflation was fast approaching.
NEWS
November 29, 2012 | By Noelle Carter
In 2009, Food did a story on fresh tofu in Southern California . We included a recipe for fresh homemade tofu. Very light in flavor, this delicate tofu is almost like a custard with its creamy texture. The method is simple: Combine some cold soy milk with nigari water (a brine used to set the soy milk) and steam the milk until it sets up like a custard. The whole process takes about 15 minutes. If you've never tried homemade tofu, give it a try! It makes a great weekend project.
FOOD
September 4, 2002 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All trends start somewhere, and for the sake of argument, you could call this the cradle of the soy latte. Colleen Crosby recalls making her first one in 1978, not long after she and her husband opened a coffeehouse here. A friend who was into two of Northern California's signature passions--veganism and gourmet coffee--had wondered if the Italian drink of steamed milk and espresso could be done with no animal products.
FOOD
April 15, 1998
Soy has gone glamorous. Certainly, Asian and vegetarian cooks know a thing or two to do with tofu, soy beans and soy milk. And health food cooks certainly haven't abandoned it. But there's something else out there--tofu conspiracy, or just soy luck?--that's making us soy-aware. For one thing, the word "tofu" is out and "soy" is in. "Soy," after all, connotes not only white blocks of protein but the whole world of soy foods. Fresh soy beans, for instance.
FOOD
October 12, 1995 | Jonathan Gold
Pretty much everybody has had a dim sum breakfast by now, the Cantonese dumplings wheeled along by cart-pushing waitresses, the great glassed-in trolleys of barbecued duck and grilled rice-noodle rolls. There are probably enough diners at dim sum restaurants in the San Gabriel Valley on a Sunday morning to fill the Anaheim Pond. Northern Chinese breakfasts are a little harder to find.
FOOD
September 26, 1996 | MARGARET SHERIDAN
Tofu is not the only soy food around. Here's a glossary of some of the more commonly found products. * Tempeh: Fermented soybeans compressed into chewy, dense cakes. It has a distinctive salty taste. It can be grilled, fried or steamed, grated in salads or substituted for ground meat in chili, burgers, cutlets, meat sauces and sloppy joes. It should be poached before using to mellow its flavor. * Miso: Fermented soybean paste.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2001
"In Heartland, Some Recipes for Disaster" (May 13) begged a question. The article quotes Oregonian Matt Brucknell, "There's no tofu on the menu here," in Kansas City. Tofu, soy milk, vegetarian sausages (to name a few) all have the soybean as a core ingredient. Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't the Midwest an important soybean-growing region? If so, some of those soybeans may become fodder for hogs and steers, but perhaps some become tofu. Would proud soybean farmers have us believe that their products are fine for swine and cattle but unfit for human consumption?
NEWS
November 29, 2012 | By Noelle Carter
In 2009, Food did a story on fresh tofu in Southern California . We included a recipe for fresh homemade tofu. Very light in flavor, this delicate tofu is almost like a custard with its creamy texture. The method is simple: Combine some cold soy milk with nigari water (a brine used to set the soy milk) and steam the milk until it sets up like a custard. The whole process takes about 15 minutes. If you've never tried homemade tofu, give it a try! It makes a great weekend project.
FOOD
November 24, 2011
After Thursday's extravaganza, it might be the right time to think about the lightest meal of the day - or the meal that affords us the rest of the day to burn off some calories, anyway. Forget pancakes. How about savory Taiwanese crullers dipped in super-fresh soy milk, house-made longaniza sausage with eggs, sweet Belizean ducunu (they're like logs of unfilled tamale made with fresh corn grated off the cob) or poached-egg soup with hand-patted tortillas? Whether on La Brea Avenue or Bolsa Avenue, early-morning options abound.
NEWS
July 13, 2010 | Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
It's not surprising that the Cato Institute — a think tank devoted to libertarian principles — is complaining about San Francisco's new policy banning Coke, Pepsi and other sugar-sweetened beverages from vending machines on city property. Cato writers are fond of throwing around terms like "food police" and "nanny state" to impugn the efforts of public health officials to, well, improve public health. The vending machine prohibition applies to soda, sports drinks, flavored waters, fruit punch or anything else with added sugar.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2010 | By Michael Ordoña
His name is Romany Romanic Malco, and he's not sure why. "I called my father 'Irving' until I was 7. When I found out I was Romany Romanic Jr. , I said, 'Who's this Romany Romanic [Sr.]? Is he going to live with us?' Anyway, my dad's name was 'Romanic Romany,' and I'm 'Romany Romanic.' My dad [passed] away Aug. 25 of '08, never really knowing who his dad was. So I have no . . . idea what my name comes from," says the extremely fit comic actor, whose 41 years are betrayed only by subtle flecks of gray in his stubble.
SCIENCE
December 9, 2009 | By Shari Roan
Soy foods do not appear to increase the risk of breast cancer recurrence among survivors of the disease and may even confer some health benefits, new research suggests. The study, published in today's issue of the Journal of the American Medical Assn., should reassure breast cancer survivors that they need not scrupulously avoid soy foods, which have become increasingly popular in the United States in recent years. Research in animals has indicated that soy might increase the chances of breast cancer recurrence because it can act like the hormone estrogen, which promotes tumor growth.
FOOD
June 24, 2009 | Betty Hallock
In the slightly cramped kitchen of Sona restaurant in West Hollywood, chef de cuisine Kuniko Yagi is standing over six bowls of tofu that she has made using three different methods in the interest of soybean curd experimentation. It's not that she hasn't already discovered a recipe for making her own tofu perfectly -- silky-smooth, creamy and luscious, with the fresh -- really fresh -- flavor of soybeans. But she's making a point.
HEALTH
August 22, 2005 | Sally Squires, Special to The Times
THESE days, soy goes far beyond the traditional soy milk and tofu. Breakfast cereals, bread, chips, frozen dinners, margarine, meatless burgers, desserts, canned tuna and even chocolate bars are just some of the popular foods that often contain soy. But is it too much of a good thing? That's a question asked by some as the Food and Drug Administration considers a petition to give soy products a new boost: a qualified health claim for possible prevention of breast, colon and prostate cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2010 | By Michael Ordoña
His name is Romany Romanic Malco, and he's not sure why. "I called my father 'Irving' until I was 7. When I found out I was Romany Romanic Jr. , I said, 'Who's this Romany Romanic [Sr.]? Is he going to live with us?' Anyway, my dad's name was 'Romanic Romany,' and I'm 'Romany Romanic.' My dad [passed] away Aug. 25 of '08, never really knowing who his dad was. So I have no . . . idea what my name comes from," says the extremely fit comic actor, whose 41 years are betrayed only by subtle flecks of gray in his stubble.
FOOD
September 24, 2008 | C. Thi Nguyen, Special to The Times
THERE ARE two kinds of fusion cooking. The first kind is self-conscious about its fusion; it exists in order to cross boundaries. It loudly proclaims its own eclecticism with emblematic ingredients -- you know, like tuna sashimi tacos with pomegranate-tahini sauce. It's theatrical fusion. But in Southern California, there's another kind of fusion cooking. It's happening in homes when someone dips a tortilla chip into some hummus, and it's happening in small neighborhood restaurants and cafes.
NEWS
May 31, 2007 | Cynthia Dea and Jessica Gelt, Times Staff Writers
SAVVY L.A. eaters know that to see the world -- or at the very least, taste it -- all you need to do is stay home. Paris, Singapore, New York -- yadda, yadda, yadda. We'd argue that nowhere else can you find the ethnic varieties of cheap eats that you find in Los Angeles. (But feel free to barrage us with challenges.) Moreover, not only can you eat the food, you can also dip your toe into another culture. Stroll Pioneer Boulevard and you're suddenly in the Gujarat state of India.
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