Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSoy Products
IN THE NEWS

Soy Products

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
June 29, 2002
Re "Humans Consume More Than Earth Can Replace, Study Says," June 25: As long as special interests can get away with influencing our political leaders to serve their own agendas rather than standing up for ecologically rational public policy, our children's and grandchildren's future is bleak. God help us all if we let greed, ambition, ignorance or indifference lay waste to the planet we call Mother Earth. Gloria Richards Simi Valley This "study" by the Oakland-based group Redefining Progress should not have been a news story.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
August 22, 2005 | Sally Squires, Special to The Times
THESE days, soy goes far beyond the traditional soy milk and tofu. Breakfast cereals, bread, chips, frozen dinners, margarine, meatless burgers, desserts, canned tuna and even chocolate bars are just some of the popular foods that often contain soy. But is it too much of a good thing? That's a question asked by some as the Food and Drug Administration considers a petition to give soy products a new boost: a qualified health claim for possible prevention of breast, colon and prostate cancer.
Advertisement
HEALTH
August 25, 2003 | Elena Conis
Although soybeans are a top agricultural product in the United States, soy products remain more popular abroad -- particularly in Asia -- than here at home. Many studies have linked soy-rich diets with good heart health, but the effects of soy supplements are less clear. Most are formulated to provide high concentrations of isoflavones -- plant chemicals such as genistein and daidzein that are found in soybeans and behave similarly to human estrogen.
HEALTH
June 14, 2004 | Judy Foreman, Special to The Times
Health food advocates have long claimed that soy, the little legume used in tofu burgers and smoothies, can protect against heart disease, ward off cancer and combat hot flashes. Those claims are coming under scrutiny now that a soy food manufacturer is seeking government approval to tout on its labels soy's supposed cancer-fighting abilities.
HEALTH
August 22, 2005 | Sally Squires, Special to The Times
THESE days, soy goes far beyond the traditional soy milk and tofu. Breakfast cereals, bread, chips, frozen dinners, margarine, meatless burgers, desserts, canned tuna and even chocolate bars are just some of the popular foods that often contain soy. But is it too much of a good thing? That's a question asked by some as the Food and Drug Administration considers a petition to give soy products a new boost: a qualified health claim for possible prevention of breast, colon and prostate cancer.
HEALTH
June 14, 2004 | Judy Foreman, Special to The Times
Health food advocates have long claimed that soy, the little legume used in tofu burgers and smoothies, can protect against heart disease, ward off cancer and combat hot flashes. Those claims are coming under scrutiny now that a soy food manufacturer is seeking government approval to tout on its labels soy's supposed cancer-fighting abilities.
BUSINESS
April 28, 1999 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexican food entrepreneur Mark Roth owes his latest product innovation to his cardiologist. After heart bypass surgery in 1992, Roth's doctor told the 60-year-old he should avoid his thrice-weekly breakfast of eggs and chorizo, the tasty but fat-laden Mexican sausage Roth learned to love in his days as a supermarket owner catering to Latino customers in El Monte. No chorizo? It was a life sentence for the guy who founded El Burrito Mexican Food Products Inc.
HEALTH
March 1, 2004 | Linda Marsa, Special to The Times
Because the early signs of oral cancer -- white spots or red areas in the mouth -- are painless and difficult to detect, diagnosis usually occurs only after the disease has spread to the lymph nodes in the neck. Consequently, patients often need aggressive, disfiguring surgical treatments. Half of those diagnosed will die of the disease.
HEALTH
October 19, 2009 | Elena Conis
Full-fat, low-fat or skim? Used to be, there weren't many choices to make over what to pour on your cereal. But the number of alternatives to cow's milk -- soy, goat's, hemp milk, more -- has steadily grown. Each has its fans: those who swear by goat's milk's creamy texture or who love almond milk's subtle, nutty flavor. But when it comes to nutrition, there's no clear winner. Cow's milk is a good source of protein but can be high in saturated fats. Hemp milk offers little protein but is rich in certain essential fatty acids.
HEALTH
February 19, 2007 | Susan Bowerman, Special to The Times
If you can't stand black coffee, chances are good that you also turn up your nose at bitter-tasting grapefruit juice, broccoli, spinach, green tea or soy products. You may be a genetic "super-taster" -- with more specialized taste buds on the tip of your tongue than the average person. For you, tasting foods can be the equivalent of feeling objects with 50 fingers instead of five -- due to tiny genetic differences you share with fellow super-tasters. The super-taster story goes back decades.
HEALTH
March 1, 2004 | Linda Marsa, Special to The Times
Because the early signs of oral cancer -- white spots or red areas in the mouth -- are painless and difficult to detect, diagnosis usually occurs only after the disease has spread to the lymph nodes in the neck. Consequently, patients often need aggressive, disfiguring surgical treatments. Half of those diagnosed will die of the disease.
HEALTH
August 25, 2003 | Elena Conis
Although soybeans are a top agricultural product in the United States, soy products remain more popular abroad -- particularly in Asia -- than here at home. Many studies have linked soy-rich diets with good heart health, but the effects of soy supplements are less clear. Most are formulated to provide high concentrations of isoflavones -- plant chemicals such as genistein and daidzein that are found in soybeans and behave similarly to human estrogen.
OPINION
June 29, 2002
Re "Humans Consume More Than Earth Can Replace, Study Says," June 25: As long as special interests can get away with influencing our political leaders to serve their own agendas rather than standing up for ecologically rational public policy, our children's and grandchildren's future is bleak. God help us all if we let greed, ambition, ignorance or indifference lay waste to the planet we call Mother Earth. Gloria Richards Simi Valley This "study" by the Oakland-based group Redefining Progress should not have been a news story.
BUSINESS
April 28, 1999 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexican food entrepreneur Mark Roth owes his latest product innovation to his cardiologist. After heart bypass surgery in 1992, Roth's doctor told the 60-year-old he should avoid his thrice-weekly breakfast of eggs and chorizo, the tasty but fat-laden Mexican sausage Roth learned to love in his days as a supermarket owner catering to Latino customers in El Monte. No chorizo? It was a life sentence for the guy who founded El Burrito Mexican Food Products Inc.
BUSINESS
January 14, 2000 | Bloomberg News
DuPont Co., which has been expanding beyond its traditional chemical businesses into agriculture and other industries, and cereal maker General Mills Inc. have formed a joint venture to develop and market soy foods. Terms were not disclosed. Under the agreement, DuPont's Protein Technologies International unit will develop soy foods to supply Minneapolis-based General Mills, which makes products such as Cheerios cereal and Betty Crocker dessert mixes.
BUSINESS
November 17, 2000
The Irvine marketer of soy protein products reported a third-quarter net loss of $520,569, or 7 cents a share, compared with a year-ago loss of $2.1 million, or 39 cents a share. Sales increased 15% to $3.8 million.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|