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FOOD
October 31, 2001 | CHARLES PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the early Middle Ages, they were making a sort of soy sauce in the Middle East. And amazingly, a recipe for it got translated into Latin. Or maybe not so amazingly; medieval Europe was curious about the luxuries of the East. So Jambobinus (or maybe Jamboninus) of Cremona, a Spaniard living in 13th century Venice, translated 82 Arabic recipes and made them available to his fellow Europeans as " Liber de Ferculis et Condimentis " ("The Book of Dishes and Seasonings").
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NEWS
July 16, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
In the last two or three years, more and more Sushi Roku diners have asked for gluten-free food, so the restaurant company decided to develop a menu for people avoiding wheat, barley and rye. Customers at sushi restaurants have always had the option to eat sushi or sashimi, as long as they avoided soy sauce, which often contains wheat. But soy sauce isn't just in a bottle on tables; it's often an ingredient in other sauces. When a diner asks about gluten, it can take 10 or 15 minutes for a waiter to go through a menu and discuss alterations that would suit the diner, says Tom Cardenas, vice president of operations.
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MAGAZINE
August 24, 2003 | JAMIE PURVIANCE, Jamie Purviance's latest cookbook is "Weber's Big Book of Grilling."
Barbecue sauce is the great assimilator of American cooking. It absorbs one ingredient after another, according to the sauce's time and place, as long as each new splash, dash or drizzle can get along with the rest of the brew. In the early 1800s, the first barbecue sauces, developed in the American South, blended butter and wine with walnut or mushroom "ketchups," which were really more like savory chutneys.
NEWS
June 14, 2013 | By Noelle Carter
Sometimes nothing beats an easy one-dish meal. Especially if it comes together in an hour or less. Hash is a great option when you want something simple -- it's one-pan comfort food. Simply combine potatoes with the meat of your choice and flavor as desired. Voila. Check out these options: For diner-style roast beef hash, take that leftover roast beef in the fridge and cook it up with some cubed potatoes, bell pepper, garlic and jalapeño for a little heat. Thinking chicken? Take leftover chicken (or pick up a rotisserie chicken from the store on your way home)
BUSINESS
April 9, 2000 | JOSEPH COLEMAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The emperor's soy sauce is ready. The beans have fermented a full year in huge wooden vats. Workers have strained the sauce by hand through pure cotton filters. Tasters have given their nods of approval. Now bring a saucer of the amber liquid to your lips and see for yourself: a single drop fills your mouth with flavor. Hours later, the salty tang still lingers in your throat. Soy sauce is just a seasoning to most folks. But at Kikkoman Corp.
FOOD
August 25, 2012 | By Betty Hallock, Los Angeles Times
The latest trendy cooking ingredient in Japan is a fungus. And that fungus is spreading. Professional and home cooks in Japan are crazy for it, and it's flying off the shelves at Japanese markets in the U.S., too. They're using shio koji -- a fermented mixture of koji (rice inoculated with the special -- and safe -- mold Aspergillus oryzae), shio (sea salt) and water - as a seasoning in place of salt for its powers of umami. Japanese supermarkets carry bottled salad dressings and sauces touting shio koji as an ingredient.
FOOD
January 9, 1986 | ROSE DOSTI, Times Staff Writer
Dear SOS: I'm crazy about the fajitas served at the El Torito restaurant chain. Is there a chance for the recipe? READER Dear Reader: El Torito complied with two recipes--one using beef and the other chicken, and good recipes they are, too. Chicken fajitas are basted with achiote sauce, made with achiote powder, which can be found at any Mexican grocery store or Mexican products counter of supermarkets.
FOOD
April 14, 2012
Sea bean salad Total time: 15 minutes Servings: 2 Note: Adapted from Joan's on Third. Sea beans may be available at select Asian markets as well as online at earthy.com and marxfoods.com ; you can also contact your local produce manager to see if the market might order them for you. If you cannot locate sea beans, an equal amount of snow peas or pea shoots can be substituted. 1/2 pound sea beans 3/4 pound yellow wax beans 1/2 pound shelled edamame beans (about 2 cups)
FOOD
December 30, 2009
Soba-tsuyu (dipping sauce for cold soba noodles) Total time: 25 minutes, plus cooling time Servings: This makes about 6 1/2 cups of dipping sauce. Note: Adapted from Akila Inouye. Mirin (look for mirin made with just rice, rice spirit and malt) and dried bonito flakes are available at Asian markets. Hongaeshi (dipping sauce base) 1/3 cup sugar 1/4 cup plus a scant 3 tablespoons mirin 2 cups plus a scant 2 tablespoons soy sauce Place the sugar and mirin into a pot over medium heat and dissolve the sugar completely.
FOOD
June 9, 2012
  Total time: 2 hours Servings: 6 to 8 Note: Serve the ribs with steamed rice and radish kimchee. Korean soy sauce, malted rice syrup, jujubes and Korean sesame oil can be found at Korean markets and select Asian markets. 3 1/2 pounds bone-in beef short ribs, cut crosswise (flanken-style) into 2- to 3-inch strips Kosher salt 1 tablespoon canola or vegetable oil 1/2 cup Korean soy sauce 1/4 cup Korean malted rice syrup 1/2 cup mirin 1/2 onion, grated 4 ounces daikon radish, grated (½ cup)
NEWS
February 10, 2013 | By Noelle Carter
This week's Culinary SOS request comes from Janelle Webb in Bakersfield: "My co-worker raves about the chicken tequila fettucine from California Pizza Kitchen . Her birthday is coming up in February, and we would like to make the dish for a girls' night in to celebrate. Do you have the recipe?" Happy birthday to your friend, and have fun celebrating! California Pizza Kitchen was happy to share its recipe, which you can find below. And check out more Culinary SOS recipes . If you have a favorite restaurant recipe you'd like to request, email me . I'll do my best to track it down.
NEWS
February 5, 2013
In this Filipino take on chicken adobo from chef Andre Guerrero, chicken pieces are simmered in a fragrant blend of soy sauce, garlic, cider vinegar, black pepper and bay leaves. When the chicken is tender, the sauce is reduced, then tossed again with the chicken before serving. It's a wonderfully rich yet simple dish, perfect served alongside a simple salad or side -- Guerrero recommends jasmine rice -- and it comes together in only an hour. For more quick-fix dinner ideas, check out our video recipe gallery . Food editor Russ Parsons and Test Kitchen manager Noelle Carter show you how to fix several dishes in an hour or less.
FOOD
January 12, 2013
  While most experienced cooks can agree - more or less - on basic equipment, the pantry is much more a matter of individual choice. How you cook will determine what you cook, in this case. If you prefer Italian, you're going to want a greater variety of dried pastas and at least a couple of olive oils. If you cook Japanese, you'll be choosier about rice and different kinds of soy sauce. This is my highly personal list of the things I need in my basic pantry. Baking All-purpose flour Granulated sugar Light brown sugar Powdered sugar Baking soda Baking powder Cornmeal Spice cabinet Dried thyme Dried oregano Black peppercorns Vanilla extract Ground cinnamon Cloves Bay leaves Dried red pepper flakes Cumin Fennel seeds Kosher salt Almonds Walnuts Pantry staples Olive oil Vegetable oil Soy sauce Vinegars, at least red wine and sherry Canned beans (white, pinto, garbanzo)
NEWS
December 19, 2012 | By Betty Hallock
Holiday traffic, gift shopping, partying…. It's a relief to slow down with a good cookbook that reflects an idyllic life on a farm in northern  Japan , where the cooking revolves around food that's grown at home and prepared simply. “ Japanese Farm Food ” by Nancy Singleton Hachishu, who moved from California to Japan and ended up marrying a farmer and living in his ancestral home two hours from Tokyo, is a transporting respite. The book opens with a description of her Japanese farmhouse kitchen, a place of wood posts and beams, filled with her collection of 100-year-old baskets and bowls.
NEWS
August 25, 2012 | By Noelle Carter
This week, deputy Food editor Betty Hallock is all about shio koji : "The latest trendy cooking ingredient in Japan is a fungus. And that fungus is spreading. Professional and home cooks in Japan are crazy for it, and it's flying off the shelves at Japanese markets in the U.S., too. "They're using shio koji -- a fermented mixture of koji (rice innoculated with the special -- and safe -- mold Aspergillus oryzae), shio (sea salt) and water -- as a seasoning in place of salt for its powers of umami.
FOOD
August 25, 2012 | By Betty Hallock, Los Angeles Times
The latest trendy cooking ingredient in Japan is a fungus. And that fungus is spreading. Professional and home cooks in Japan are crazy for it, and it's flying off the shelves at Japanese markets in the U.S., too. They're using shio koji -- a fermented mixture of koji (rice inoculated with the special -- and safe -- mold Aspergillus oryzae), shio (sea salt) and water - as a seasoning in place of salt for its powers of umami. Japanese supermarkets carry bottled salad dressings and sauces touting shio koji as an ingredient.
FOOD
July 22, 2009 | Noelle Carter
Dear SOS: A friend of mine and I were extremely lucky to go to Susan Feniger's Street during a soft launch day. The one thing that stands out from that day of culinary exploration was the Kaya toast, a simply toasted piece of white bread topped with the most delectable coconut egg jam/cream we have ever tasted. I was lucky enough to stumble upon a recipe on the Internet for it, but both the source and measurements sound dubious. Please help!
FOOD
January 26, 2012
Nikujaga (braised sukiyaki-style beef with potatoes and onions) Total time: 1 hour Servings: 2 to 3 Note: Nikujaga is a Japanese beef stew that tastes even better the second day, reheated. You can use ichibandashi or the thinner nibandashi for this. Thin slices of pork can be substituted for beef. Thinly sliced sukiyaki-style beef can be found at Japanese markets. 1 pound baking potatoes, preferably smaller 1 small onion 3/4 pound thinly sliced sukiyaki-style beef 2 tablespoons vegetable oil About 3 cups of dashi (enough to cover the ingredients in the pan)
FOOD
June 9, 2012
  Total time: 2 hours Servings: 6 to 8 Note: Serve the ribs with steamed rice and radish kimchee. Korean soy sauce, malted rice syrup, jujubes and Korean sesame oil can be found at Korean markets and select Asian markets. 3 1/2 pounds bone-in beef short ribs, cut crosswise (flanken-style) into 2- to 3-inch strips Kosher salt 1 tablespoon canola or vegetable oil 1/2 cup Korean soy sauce 1/4 cup Korean malted rice syrup 1/2 cup mirin 1/2 onion, grated 4 ounces daikon radish, grated (½ cup)
FOOD
April 14, 2012
Sea bean salad Total time: 15 minutes Servings: 2 Note: Adapted from Joan's on Third. Sea beans may be available at select Asian markets as well as online at earthy.com and marxfoods.com ; you can also contact your local produce manager to see if the market might order them for you. If you cannot locate sea beans, an equal amount of snow peas or pea shoots can be substituted. 1/2 pound sea beans 3/4 pound yellow wax beans 1/2 pound shelled edamame beans (about 2 cups)
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