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SCIENCE
May 24, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The crew of the International Space Station could have a rough return to Earth because their reentry capsule has the same glitch that caused problems on the last two landings, a Russian space industry source told Reuters on Friday. Russia's space agency would not comment on technical problems but said the Soyuz-TMA capsule was safe. Concerns have been raised about the safety of the Soyuz because the last two reentries have not gone according to plan.
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SCIENCE
May 28, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Two astronauts and one cosmonaut will blast off into space on Tuesday afternoon, arriving at the International Space Station about six hours later. You can watch both the launch and the docking of the spacecraft live right here, thanks to streaming video provided by NASA. NASA will start its live broadcast of the launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 12:30 p.m. (Pacific). The space agency will also be live streaming the docking of the spacecraft at the ISS. That broadcast will start at 6:30 p.m. (Pacific)
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NEWS
February 8, 1987 | United Press International
Two Soviet cosmonauts guided their Soyuz space capsule to a successful docking with an orbiting "space hotel" today, bringing the Soviet Union one step closer to its goal of a permanently manned outpost in space. The linkup with the Mir space station, considered one of the most difficult maneuvers in manned space flight, was completed at 2:28 this morning, the official news agency Tass said. Table Already Set Waiting for Flight Commander Yuri V.
NATIONAL
May 13, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Space exploration and mass media always seem to travel in parallel orbits, like twin planets linked by an unseen tether. Now, a Twitter-happy Canadian who has been giving the Earth poetic glimpses of itself from the International Space Station is saying goodbye in a most peculiar way. Like a small metal moon, the ISS has orbited Earth for almost 13 years, which can make it easy to forget how cool it is. Cmdr. Chris Hadfield has been reminding us. "Arid fingers of sand-blasted rock look like they're barely holding on against the hot Saharan wind," Hadfield tweeted with one photo of Africa's largest desert.  MORE: Chris Hadfield, coolest Canadian ever "Seven billion hearts, but I can see only one," he added, on Valentine's Day Feb. 14, tweeting a photo of an island formation resembling a heart . Although lower orbit is a good distance for beautiful color photography, it's a long way from home when tragedy strikes.
NATIONAL
May 13, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Space exploration and mass media always seem to travel in parallel orbits, like twin planets linked by an unseen tether. Now, a Twitter-happy Canadian who has been giving the Earth poetic glimpses of itself from the International Space Station is saying goodbye in a most peculiar way. Like a small metal moon, the ISS has orbited Earth for almost 13 years, which can make it easy to forget how cool it is. Cmdr. Chris Hadfield has been reminding us. "Arid fingers of sand-blasted rock look like they're barely holding on against the hot Saharan wind," Hadfield tweeted with one photo of Africa's largest desert.  MORE: Chris Hadfield, coolest Canadian ever "Seven billion hearts, but I can see only one," he added, on Valentine's Day Feb. 14, tweeting a photo of an island formation resembling a heart . Although lower orbit is a good distance for beautiful color photography, it's a long way from home when tragedy strikes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1986 | DAVID C. WEBB, David C. Webb, a space-policy consultant in Washington, is a member of the National Commission on Space.
The tragic destruction of the space shuttle Challenger and its crew drives home a message that was bound to come sooner or later: Exploration is dangerous, and always has been. The exploration of space can be no different from that of any other frontier.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2012
"Made in Jersey," the new CBS series starring Janet Montgomery as a scrappy, street-smart New Jersey attorney working in a Manhattan law firm, is apparently the first casualty of the fall TV season. The series, which has drawn low ratings since its Sept. 28 premiere, has been pulled from the Friday lineup after just two airings. A network spokesman confirmed Wednesday that the show, which was created by former Los Angeles Times reporter Dana Calvo, had been yanked but gave no further details on when or if it would return to the schedule.
SCIENCE
May 28, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Two astronauts and one cosmonaut will blast off into space on Tuesday afternoon, arriving at the International Space Station about six hours later. You can watch both the launch and the docking of the spacecraft live right here, thanks to streaming video provided by NASA. NASA will start its live broadcast of the launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 12:30 p.m. (Pacific). The space agency will also be live streaming the docking of the spacecraft at the ISS. That broadcast will start at 6:30 p.m. (Pacific)
WORLD
October 30, 2002 | From Reuters
A manned Soyuz rocket blasted off from Russia's Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan today, headed for the International Space Station, Russia's Mission Control said. "The Soyuz-TMA booster rocket lifted as planned.... Everything is fine," a spokesman said. The launch of the rocket, which was originally scheduled for Monday, was delayed after the fatal explosion of a Soyuz cargo rocket of a similar type shortly after takeoff from Russia's Arctic Plesetsk cosmodrome Oct. 15.
NEWS
November 28, 1988 | Associated Press
A Soyuz TM-7 spacecraft carrying a joint Soviet-French team docked today with the Mir orbiting space station, the Tass press agency said. Soviet cosmonauts Alexander Volkov and Sergei Krikalev, and Frenchman Jean-Loup Chretien joined up with the three Soviets aboard the Mir, and are all feeling well, Tass said. Volkov, Krikalev and Chretien blasted off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Soviet Central Asia on Saturday, with French President Francois Mitterrand on hand to watch.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2012
"Made in Jersey," the new CBS series starring Janet Montgomery as a scrappy, street-smart New Jersey attorney working in a Manhattan law firm, is apparently the first casualty of the fall TV season. The series, which has drawn low ratings since its Sept. 28 premiere, has been pulled from the Friday lineup after just two airings. A network spokesman confirmed Wednesday that the show, which was created by former Los Angeles Times reporter Dana Calvo, had been yanked but gave no further details on when or if it would return to the schedule.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Man on a Mission: Richard Garriott's Road to the Stars" is the ultimate vanity project (in the form of a documentary) for the video game guru who had $30 million burning a hole in his pocket and an equally outsized desire for a trip out of this world. It's a bit precious in its narcissistic point of view, but still a kick to watch the hopelessly devoted astronaut wannabe fulfill his wildest dream. The film traces the training, the rocket ship ride and the time he spent at the International Space Station in 2008 in one of the most expansive, and no doubt expensive, home movies you're ever likely to see, Uncle Bill's Rome adventure not withstanding.
NATIONAL
July 28, 2011 | By Ralph Vartabedian, Los Angeles Times
The space shuttle flew to the International Space Station 37 times, but its retirement leaves NASA reliant on the Russian Soyuz for future trips, raising the question of what would happen if the Soyuz is grounded for an accident or another problem. As it turns out, NASA does not have a formal contingency plan, said Michael Suffredini, NASA's program manager for the space station. But without hesitation, he rattled off a list of steps the agency could take. "We would keep the crew on orbit for some months and likely extend that if we thought that was viable," Suffredini said.
SCIENCE
September 27, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A political stalemate that threatened to boot the United States off the International Space Station eased this week after U.S. lawmakers passed an exemption allowing NASA to buy rides from the Russians, agency officials said. Without authorization to spend tax dollars on Russian Soyuz spacecraft and other space services, NASA would have been unable to get to the space station just as the $100-billion complex is finally finished and ready for full-time science. The Soyuz capsules are the only available vehicles capable of ferrying people to and from the station aside from the U.S. space shuttles, which are to be retired in two years.
SCIENCE
May 24, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The crew of the International Space Station could have a rough return to Earth because their reentry capsule has the same glitch that caused problems on the last two landings, a Russian space industry source told Reuters on Friday. Russia's space agency would not comment on technical problems but said the Soyuz-TMA capsule was safe. Concerns have been raised about the safety of the Soyuz because the last two reentries have not gone according to plan.
WORLD
April 15, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A Soyuz-FG rocket lifted off from Russia's base at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on a two-day journey to the International Space Station. Russian cosmonaut Sergei Krikalev and American astronaut John Phillips were headed for a six-month stay, and Italian astronaut Roberto Vittori of the European Space Agency was due to return to Earth in 10 days with the current station crew. Russian Salizhan Sharipov and American Leroy Chiao have been in space since October.
WORLD
October 14, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Two Russians and an American took off aboard a Soyuz spacecraft from Baikonur, Kazakhstan, breaking a nearly 30-year tradition of having at least one crewman with previous experience in piloting the capsule. Russians Salizhan Sharipov and Yuri Shargin and American Leroy Chiao are to dock with the International Space Station two days after the launch. Chiao and Sharipov both have flown U.S. space shuttles; Shargin is a space rookie.
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