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Spa Resort Casino

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May 9, 2010 | By Alice Short, Los Angeles Times
Making an appointment at Palm Springs' Spa Resort Casino is easy. I dial the number listed on the website, and after I am on hold about 90 seconds, a live person schedules a 50-minute "signature facial" for the following day. The fee ($120) includes access to a fitness center and a series of saunas, plus the "taking of the waters." Getting to the spa proves slightly more challenging. The website lists the address in downtown Palm Springs as 401 E. Amado Road, but that's the location of the casino.
ARTICLES BY DATE
IMAGE
May 9, 2010 | By Alice Short, Los Angeles Times
Making an appointment at Palm Springs' Spa Resort Casino is easy. I dial the number listed on the website, and after I am on hold about 90 seconds, a live person schedules a 50-minute "signature facial" for the following day. The fee ($120) includes access to a fitness center and a series of saunas, plus the "taking of the waters." Getting to the spa proves slightly more challenging. The website lists the address in downtown Palm Springs as 401 E. Amado Road, but that's the location of the casino.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 2003 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
After decades as a desert hideaway for such celebrities as Frank Sinatra and Bob Hope, Palm Springs in the 1980s became a hot spot for mobs of college students on spring break and winter tourists seeking golf, sunshine and clean air. By the early 1990s, the city was losing ground.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 2003 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
After decades as a desert hideaway for such celebrities as Frank Sinatra and Bob Hope, Palm Springs in the 1980s became a hot spot for mobs of college students on spring break and winter tourists seeking golf, sunshine and clean air. By the early 1990s, the city was losing ground.
MAGAZINE
December 10, 2000 | TOM GORMAN, Tom Gorman is a Times staff writer. His last article for the magazine explored the future of Las Vegas
Richard Milanovich, who doesn't like to gamble because he doesn't like losing money, grins broadly from the podium at the Spa Hotel and Casino in downtown Palm Springs as he gives away a million dollars of the casino's gambling profits. "Oh, this is so much fun," he says, announcing a $150,000 donation to the Palm Springs Fire Department.
BUSINESS
September 13, 2002 | From Associated Press
Las Vegas Strip resort operator MGM Mirage has signed an agreement with the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians to help the California tribe develop a casino in downtown Palm Springs. The agreement marks the casino giant's first move into Indian gambling, though the company is pursuing other arrangements with tribes nationwide. Unlike deals other major casino operators have struck with tribes, MGM Mirage won't manage the casino but will serve as a consultant.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians has obtained $140 million in bank financing to build a $95-million casino in Palm Springs and repay construction loans for the Rancho Mirage gambling hall it opened in 2001, attorneys for the tribe said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2007 | Claire Noland, Times Staff Writer
Ray Patencio, a tribal elder who led the Agua Caliente band of Cahuilla Indians through a time of dramatic change in the Coachella Valley, died Thursday night, the eve of his 61st birthday. The tribal chairman from 1972 to 1981 and gaming commission chairman since 1995, Patencio died at his Palm Springs home after an illness, tribal spokeswoman Nancy Conrad said. A cause of death was not announced. "He was an incredible leader," tribal Chairman Richard M. Milanovich said in a statement.
TRAVEL
March 5, 2006 | Andrew Bender, Special to The Times
MY friend Todd, a New Yorker, abhors fruity martinis. He can spot wood veneer at 50 paces and gets antsy around imperfect service. This is not to say that Todd is demanding; let's just say he's an arbiter of taste. Todd likes Palm Springs, though, and that's where we met up in January.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2002 | Scott Gold, Times Staff Writer
Cinder-block shacks, bad lighting and bottom-shelf booze. Lounge lizards with long ashes clinging to the tips of their cigarettes, placing nickel-and-dime bets on one-armed bandits and one-eyed jacks. Not all that long ago, that was the image Native American casinos had in the eyes of the heavy rollers in Nevada. The notion that "rez gambling" would ever offer real competition to the neon palaces of Nevada was tossed aside with a contemptuous chuckle, like a short stack of $1 chips.
MAGAZINE
December 10, 2000 | TOM GORMAN, Tom Gorman is a Times staff writer. His last article for the magazine explored the future of Las Vegas
Richard Milanovich, who doesn't like to gamble because he doesn't like losing money, grins broadly from the podium at the Spa Hotel and Casino in downtown Palm Springs as he gives away a million dollars of the casino's gambling profits. "Oh, this is so much fun," he says, announcing a $150,000 donation to the Palm Springs Fire Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2008 | Susannah Rosenblatt, Times Staff Writer
Authorities on Wednesday identified the 24-year-old fugitive who was shot and killed outside a downtown Palm Springs casino after he allegedly pulled a weapon on law enforcement officers. The Riverside County coroner's office identified the man as Nino Joseph Garcia Jr. of Banning. The gunfire erupted shortly after 6 p.m. Tuesday and forced patrons and employees of the Spa Resort and Casino to duck for cover.
NEWS
February 24, 2005 | Valli Herman
Lodging Andalusian Court, 458 W. Arenas Road, Palm Springs, (760) 323-9980; www.andalusiancourt.com. Decorated in a Spanish Revival style, this 25-suite property in the Tennis Club district was restored and reopened in 2004. Rooms have fireplaces and villas have kitchens and spa-sized tubs. Del Marcos Hotel, 225 W. Baristo Road, Palm Springs, (800) 676-1214; www.delmarcoshotel.com. Designed by William F.
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