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NEWS
July 25, 2012
The TV show “Breaking Bad” is awesome. When will Apple Inc. release the new iPhone 5?
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BUSINESS
April 25, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
Elon Musk, founder and chief executive of Hawthorne rocket maker SpaceX, hastily called a news conference Friday in Washington, D.C., where he outlined an array of matters confronting his upstart company. A cryptic email was sent to media around 9 p.m. Pacific time Thursday that said he would "make an important SpaceX announcement" the next day at the National Press Club. The big announcement, however, wasn't quite clear. Musk made several revelations during the half-hour event. First, he provided an update on SpaceX's goal of creating the world's first fully reusable rocket - the holy grail in rocketry.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1997
Since we have very intelligent unmanned satellites, I have wondered why we need man in space. The Mir space station has provided the answer--to repair the life-support systems. M. EDMUND ELLION Santa Ynez
SCIENCE
April 22, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Live streaming video by Ustream The spacewalk tools have been laid out. The Quest airlock has been set up. There's a spacewalk coming, and you can watch it live right here. Early Wednesday morning NASA astronauts Rick Mastracchio and Steve Swanson will don their spacesuits for a 2 1/2 -hour spacewalk outside the International Space Station. Barring any surprises, NASA's live coverage of the event will begin at 5:30 a.m. PDT. The spacewalk itself is scheduled to start at 6:20 a.m.  The spacewalk was ordered this month to replace a computer on the space station's exterior that failed during a routine check.
SCIENCE
August 29, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
 This view of Tropical Storm Isaac was taken early Tuesday by NASA's Suomi-NPP satellite. Researchers used the satellite's Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite, which detects light in a range of wavelengths from green to near-infrared and uses light intensification for the amplification of weak signals. Isaac's clouds were illuminated by reflected moonlight. City lights can be seen through some areas of the storm. LATimesScience@gmail.com Twitter/@LATMaugh
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1999
Joel Greenberg, in his May 19 review of the PBS special "Voyage to the Milky Way" (" 'Milky Way' Explores Space, and Spacey Dreams"), got it partially right. There are a lot of spacey people hyping space. He got it wrong saying I intend to "strip-mine . . . celestial objects." I founded SpaceDev to make profits gathering new scientific data at a fraction of current costs. I am not interested in strip-mining anything and have strong environmental credentials. I never hesitate to speak out on current and future space pollution issues.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2014 | By Amy Hubbard
New SpaceX video shows its Falcon 9 Reusable rocket launching, hovering and then successfully landing again. The video has gone viral online with more than 2.4 million views as of early Monday afternoon. It's the first test flight of the F9R and an exciting moment for Elon Musk and company: Reusable rockets are the holy grail of rocketry . As the Los Angeles Times' W.J. Hennigan recently reported, a reusable system represents sizable savings in development and operation of the rocket.  Musk tweeted about the test flight, which was filmed by drone, on Friday -- the same day that a SpaceX Falcon 9 was blasting off from Cape Canaveral, Fla., on a NASA cargo mission to the International Space Station.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan and Andrea Chang
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on Friday and sped through a cloud-covered sky on its way to deliver supplies to the International Space Station for NASA. The Hawthorne-based rocket manufacturer launched the cargo mission despite a computer glitch aboard the space station and bad weather that threatened to push the liftoff back a day. Promptly at 12:25 p.m. PDT, the rocket fired up its nine engines and launched into orbit, carrying a capsule packed with 5,000 pounds of supplies for the two American, one Japanese and three Russian astronauts aboard the space station.
HOME & GARDEN
April 18, 2014 | By Marissa Gluck
It's been more than 40 years since architects started embracing green design principles. Spurred by the environmental movement of the 1960s and 1970s, architects began to think about building homes that were more environmentally friendly. Today, green has become standard even as the term itself reaches saturation. Green features such as solar panels, low-flow shower heads and tankless water heaters, once considered cutting-edge, are now commonplace in Southern California. Nearly a quarter of all newly built homes in the U.S. last year were green, according to industry research firm McGraw Hill Construction.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
A high-stakes battle is underway in Washington over launching the U.S. government's most sophisticated national security satellites. Space entrepreneur Elon Musk is pitted against the nation's two largest weapons makers, Boeing Co. and Lockheed Martin Corp., in a fight for military contracts worth as much as $70 billion through 2030. For eight years, the Pentagon has paid Boeing and Lockheed - operating jointly as United Launch Alliance - to launch the government's pricey spy satellites without seeking competitive bids.
NATIONAL
April 12, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Officials at NASA and SpaceX were working through the weekend to see whether they could still safely rocket a cargo capsule to the International Space Station on Monday, despite the failure of one of the backup computers in the system that helps dock the pod in space. While workers continued to prepare for a Monday afternoon launch, NASA said a final determination would likely come Sunday afternoon. The deployment of 5,000 pounds of supplies to the space station by SpaceX's unmanned Falcon 9 rocket has already been delayed a month because of other technical issues.
HOME & GARDEN
April 12, 2014 | Anne Colby
Rustic Canyon's sylvan beauty and funky charm cast its spell on Jill Soffer a dozen years ago. She liked the neighborhood's relaxed environment and abundance of sycamore trees and purchased a home there in 2002. "There's all this green around. It's not too manicured," Soffer said appreciatively. "People are easygoing, everything is a little overgrown, and the creek in the middle of everything is a little shaggy. You can hear the frogs at night. " She planned to renovate her 1920s three-bedroom house, but hadn't yet when she met and then in 2008 married Greg Adler, who had two young sons.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
INDIO, Calif. - In the sprawl of desert scrub brush and freeway ramps that is this industrial part of Indio, the sun burns brightly in a barren office park. Light and shadows flash off the scorched asphalt, and the landscape is a spare palette of dusty brown, faded green and gray. Inside one tucked-away structure, however, artist Phillip K. Smith III is preparing to paint the sky red. Or pink. Or green, depending. FULL COVERAGE: Coachella 2014 "Welcome to the different sides of my brain," Smith says, leading the way through his studio, which looks like an airplane hangar and is filled with elements of a light installation premiering at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival.
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