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Space Adventures

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NATIONAL
November 22, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
Japanese millionaire Daisuke Enomoto spent $21 million to become a space tourist but accuses the company that was supposed make it happen of brushing him aside with little more than "sorry, no refunds." A federal judge in Alexandria heard arguments in Enomoto's lawsuit against Space Adventures, which made its name brokering deals with the Russian space agency to put half a dozen "space tourists" in orbit for $20 million or more. Space Adventures wants the lawsuit thrown out, saying Enomoto was disqualified in 2006 because of a chronic kidney-stone condition.
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NEWS
October 10, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
British classical soprano Sarah Brightman plans to head for the stars, becoming the latest tourist to visit the International Space Station. Brightman, 52, announced her planned trip during a news conference in Moscow on Wednesday, the same day the cargo-loaded SpaceX mission made history by connecting with the space station. Brightman said she wants to be the first professional musician to sing from space during her 16 spins around the Earth, according to a statement from Russian-based Space Adventures Ltd. She's to be aboard the space station for 10 days, though no flight schedule has been set yet. The UNESCO artist for peace ambassador said in the statement: "I hope that I can encourage others to take inspiration from my journey both to chase down their own dreams and to help fulfill the important UNESCO mandate to promote peace and sustainable development on Earth and from space.
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SCIENCE
March 20, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A company that has sent paying tourists to the international space station said Tuesday it was scouting locations for a spaceport to send travelers on suborbital flights. Sites in Australia, the Bahamas, Florida, Japan, Malaysia, Nevada, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Singapore and Dubai in the United Arab Emirates are under consideration, the Arlington, Va.-based firm Space Adventures said in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2012 | By David Ng
Sarah Brightman, the original Christine in "The Phantom of the Opera," is training to become a space tourist and is planning to travel to the International Space Station in 2015. The British singer made the announcement Wednesday at a news conference in Moscow. Brightman said that she has begun training with the Russians to prepare for her 10-day voyage. The singer will travel to the station on a Soyuz spacecraft. At the news conference, which has been posted to YouTube as well as the singer's official website, Brightman plugged her "Dreamchaser" world tour, which is expected to end in 2013.
TRAVEL
November 2, 1997 | TIMES STAFF AND WIRES
In perhaps the ultimate trial balloon, a new company says it will let tourists experience weightlessness and journey to the edge of space aboard Russian aircraft. You'll need to travel light but bring lots of money. For $5,500, Virginia-based Space Adventures says it will whisk you from Moscow to nearby Star City and let you experience a few minutes of weightlessness on flights aboard a modified IL-76 MDK jet aircraft, used to train cosmonauts.
BUSINESS
June 12, 2008 | Cecilia Kang, Washington Post
First there was Google Earth. Now its co-founder wants to take on the universe. Sergey Brin, the 34-year-old president of technology for the search-engine company, has put down a $5-million deposit for a seat aboard a Russian spacecraft, tourism company Space Adventures said Wednesday. With a launch date set for 2011, Brin will join an exclusive club of the super-rich who have used their fortunes for the ultimate in adventure travel.
NEWS
October 10, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
British classical soprano Sarah Brightman plans to head for the stars, becoming the latest tourist to visit the International Space Station. Brightman, 52, announced her planned trip during a news conference in Moscow on Wednesday, the same day the cargo-loaded SpaceX mission made history by connecting with the space station. Brightman said she wants to be the first professional musician to sing from space during her 16 spins around the Earth, according to a statement from Russian-based Space Adventures Ltd. She's to be aboard the space station for 10 days, though no flight schedule has been set yet. The UNESCO artist for peace ambassador said in the statement: "I hope that I can encourage others to take inspiration from my journey both to chase down their own dreams and to help fulfill the important UNESCO mandate to promote peace and sustainable development on Earth and from space.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2012 | By David Ng
Sarah Brightman, the original Christine in "The Phantom of the Opera," is training to become a space tourist and is planning to travel to the International Space Station in 2015. The British singer made the announcement Wednesday at a news conference in Moscow. Brightman said that she has begun training with the Russians to prepare for her 10-day voyage. The singer will travel to the station on a Soyuz spacecraft. At the news conference, which has been posted to YouTube as well as the singer's official website, Brightman plugged her "Dreamchaser" world tour, which is expected to end in 2013.
NEWS
January 17, 1985 | LEE HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
Upon meeting an astronaut for the first time Monday, 12-year-old Eric Williams nearly jumped out of his seat to ask a question he had to have answered. "Are there any plans to put children in space?" the fifth-grader asked. Astronaut Guion Bluford told the student the National Aeronautics and Space Administration had no immediate plans to send children into space.
NATIONAL
November 22, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
One of the government's witnesses against convicted Sen. Ted Stevens of Alaska said he didn't tell the truth about an immunity deal with the Justice Department in exchange for his testimony. But federal prosecutors say his current story is the false one. "I testified to the fact that there was never immunity for me or my family and friends," welder David Anderson said in a November letter to a federal judge placed in court files by Stevens' lawyers. "That is simply not true."
BUSINESS
September 15, 2010 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Astronauts and space tourists could one day be sharing an armrest as they hurtle toward outer space under an agreement announced Wednesday between aerospace giant Boeing Co. and a private spaceflight marketing firm. Under the deal, Space Adventures of Vienna, Va., will market passenger seats aboard the seven-person spaceship that Boeing is developing in Huntington Beach. It is designed to fly atop a variety of launch vehicles and is expected to be ready to go by 2015. The spaceship, dubbed the Crew Space Transportation-100, is considered a contender for the job of ferrying astronauts to and from the International Space Station after the space shuttle program ends in 2011.
NATIONAL
November 22, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
One of the government's witnesses against convicted Sen. Ted Stevens of Alaska said he didn't tell the truth about an immunity deal with the Justice Department in exchange for his testimony. But federal prosecutors say his current story is the false one. "I testified to the fact that there was never immunity for me or my family and friends," welder David Anderson said in a November letter to a federal judge placed in court files by Stevens' lawyers. "That is simply not true."
NATIONAL
November 22, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
Japanese millionaire Daisuke Enomoto spent $21 million to become a space tourist but accuses the company that was supposed make it happen of brushing him aside with little more than "sorry, no refunds." A federal judge in Alexandria heard arguments in Enomoto's lawsuit against Space Adventures, which made its name brokering deals with the Russian space agency to put half a dozen "space tourists" in orbit for $20 million or more. Space Adventures wants the lawsuit thrown out, saying Enomoto was disqualified in 2006 because of a chronic kidney-stone condition.
BUSINESS
June 12, 2008 | Cecilia Kang, Washington Post
First there was Google Earth. Now its co-founder wants to take on the universe. Sergey Brin, the 34-year-old president of technology for the search-engine company, has put down a $5-million deposit for a seat aboard a Russian spacecraft, tourism company Space Adventures said Wednesday. With a launch date set for 2011, Brin will join an exclusive club of the super-rich who have used their fortunes for the ultimate in adventure travel.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2007 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
Brightness has never seemed as menacing as it does in "Sunshine," the nail-bitingly tense science-fiction thriller that emphasizes both the fearsome power of our friend the sun and how bereft we earthlings would be without its warming rays. "Sunshine" is the latest film from British director Danny Boyle, whose eclectic resume, including "Millions," "Trainspotting," and "28 Days Later," reveals a fierce disinclination to make the same film twice.
SCIENCE
March 20, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A company that has sent paying tourists to the international space station said Tuesday it was scouting locations for a spaceport to send travelers on suborbital flights. Sites in Australia, the Bahamas, Florida, Japan, Malaysia, Nevada, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Singapore and Dubai in the United Arab Emirates are under consideration, the Arlington, Va.-based firm Space Adventures said in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1990 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In August, 1976, the Nuart hosted two sold-out screenings of "Solaris," the late Andrei Tarkovsky's dazzling 1972 science-fiction film that, like Stanley Kubrick's "2001," served as an outer-space adventure and a meditation on the meaning of life. If you were among those turned away at the box office, you're getting another chance: "Solaris" returns to the Nuart Wednesday to begin a full week's run.
BUSINESS
August 12, 1986 | JAMES BATES, Times Staff Writer
Bio-Man and his squad were in danger. This time, however, their fate was not resting in the hands of Zadar, the evil half-human, half-robot thug who wants to conquer the world, but in those of two actors unions and a coalition of television producers locked in tense contract negotiations.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2000 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After the box office mid-winter freeze of the last few weeks, "Mission to Mars" provided somewhat of a thaw, debuting to a red-hot estimate of $23.1 million on 3,054 screens. The critically excoriated Brian De Palma space adventure took advantage of its benign PG rating to target all demographics, doing best with males over age 25. But that was enough to outpace all its competitors and doing about 38% of the business for the top 10 films.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2000 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Nobody ever wanted Mars the way you two did." "The control module doesn't have enough thrust." "Come on, people, work the problem." "Is that what I think it is?" "Luke needs us now." "He would have wanted you to have this." "I didn't come 100 million miles to turn back in the last 10 feet." Had enough yet? If you haven't, there's a whole lot more clunky, unconvincing and just plain bad dialogue left to sample in "Mission to Mars," a movie as cold and distant as the Red Planet itself.
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