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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1998 | EDWARD M. YOON
Eleven-year-old Spencer Lubitzwas all smiles Wednesday as team leader for an interactive space mission in search of a black hole. "That was a lot of fun," said Spencer, one of 96 youths participating in the first summer space adventure camp at Castlemont School in Woodland Hills. The four-week camp, which began June 22, consists of two parts--an imaginary trip to Mars followed by a mock journey into hyperspace, said Christy Reed, camp director.
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TRAVEL
October 6, 2013
If you go THE BEST WAY TO HUNTSVILLE, ALA. From LAX, Delta, United, American and US Airways offer connecting service (change of planes) to Huntsville. Restricted round-trip fares begin at $564. WHAT TO DO U.S. Space & Rocket Center, 1 Tranquility Base, Huntsville; (800) 637-7223, http://www.rocketcenter.com . Home to one of the world's most comprehensive collections of space memorabilia and hardware, it also contains space-travel simulators, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center exhibits and Space Camp facilities.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1996 | TIM MAY
In this battle of the brains, the sky's no limit. During the next few weeks, kids from five San Fernando Valley elementary schools will compete in a science fair with students from more than a dozen other schools across the city for a chance to win an expense-paid trip to the U.S. Space Camp in Huntsville, Ala. Each of the 22 schools that runs city-sponsored LA's BEST after-school enrichment programs will first sponsor its own science fair.
TRAVEL
October 6, 2013 | By Jane Engle
HUNTSVILLE, Ala. - I was inept at moonwalking. My rocket was a dud. And I crashed the space shuttle. Fortunately, I was just an astronaut wannabe and not the real deal. But it's as close as this middle-aged space geek is going to get. That geekiness, inspired by IMAX documentaries on space and news coverage of NASA's final shuttle launch in 2011, was what brought me to Adult Space Academy. The trip was a gift from my wife. The three-day program is among more than a dozen versions of Space Camp, which the U.S. Space & Rocket Center in Huntsville created more than 30 years ago to give visitors a taste of what it's like to train as an astronaut.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1995
Somehow, I can't see the rationale in spending our bankrupt government's money to send children who don't even have a handle on the English language to Space Camp. ("Helping Kids Reach for the Stars," Nov. 27). The odds against any of these kids ever being involved in space flight is about the same as any of them winning the California Lottery. When they return to school, I can imagine that there'll be a very lively discussion concerning solid rocket boosters and inertial measurement units.
TRAVEL
July 1, 2001 | EILEEN OGINTZ
It's barely 6 a.m., overcast and chilly. We're too busy scrubbing the large stingray tank to notice. In the last 24 hours, the adults and kids in the group have helped build flamingo rookeries, prepared the manatees' lettuce meal and rescued an injured "whale" (an inflatable one). The bravest among us have taken the rigorous swimming test required for animal-trainer wannabes. It poured during the day, and our jeans got soaked.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1995
I would like to comment on Robert E. Thompson's letter to the editor about Space Camp ("Space Camp: A Waste of Government Funds," Dec. 3). Had he really read and understood David Wharton's article of Nov. 27 ("Helping Kids Reach for the Stars"), he would have come to the conclusion that no government funds were used to send my sixth-graders to Huntsville. Universal Studios, Hollywood sponsored the contest because of its humanitarian efforts and desire to become involved in the community and its schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1996 | TIM MAY
Two San Fernando Valley elementary school students have won trips to the U.S. Parent/Child Space Camp in Huntsville, Ala. Of the 22 entrants in the annual LA's BEST Celebrate Science Fair held last weekend, only three were selected for the top honor: a trip to NASA's space camp. The 19 runners-up will get free trips to the Woodcraft Rangers Science Camp at Stanley Ranch near Castaic Lake.
NEWS
January 31, 1988 | STEVE GEISSINGER, Associated Press
Jodie Gabriel, who'd like to attend a new California space agency camp that was announced last week, says she was going to be an attorney until she went to the space camp in Alabama. Now, the bright eighth-grader says she wants to be an astronaut. Jodie and two classmates, clad in light-blue space camp overalls, attended a Capitol news conference at which a space agency official and a state senator announced the proposed creation of a space camp and museum in Mountain View.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1995 | JEANNETTE DeSANTIS
After winning top prize at their elementary schools' science fairs, 21 finalists, including five from the San Fernando Valley, will compete Saturday for a chance to go to the United States Space Camp in Alabama. Five students will win all-expense-paid trips, along with their parents, to the U. S. Parent / Child Space Camp in Huntsville this summer, and 17 runners-up will be awarded scholarships to attend the Woodcraft Rangers Science Camp at Stanley Ranch in Castaic.
TRAVEL
July 15, 2007 | John Horn, Times Staff Writer
"TEN, nine, eight, seven, six, five!" the kids yelled. It wasn't as deafening as Times Square on New Year's Eve, but the 300 or so children attending Space Camp were as enthusiastic as any midnight revelers. The space shuttle Atlantis was poised to blast off, and by luck, its Friday night launch coincided with the start of our trip to Alabama to learn about astronauts. The campers -- some as young as 7, many in their teens -- continued the countdown, a crescendo of "four, three, two, one!"
NATIONAL
September 26, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
An anonymous buyer purchased Space Camp Florida and the Astronaut Hall of Fame for $100,000 at auction. The transaction was made through SC Realty of Birmingham, Ala. Brenda McMillan, a spokeswoman for the two Titusville attractions, said employees were told there was no possibility the sale could save the facilities in their current form. Sluggish attendance after an economic downturn and last year's terrorist attacks hindered Space Camp's ability to pay its debt, officials said.
NATIONAL
September 25, 2002 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here on a school field trip, Grace Wilkowski trooped past cases of memorabilia from the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo missions, and etched acrylic likenesses of the astronauts who were heroes to a generation of Americans. Space, remarked the Georgia teen, seems so passe. "With the problems we have on Earth, space exploration isn't now our top priority," said the 14-year-old from Savannah who wants to become a physician.
TRAVEL
July 1, 2001 | EILEEN OGINTZ
It's barely 6 a.m., overcast and chilly. We're too busy scrubbing the large stingray tank to notice. In the last 24 hours, the adults and kids in the group have helped build flamingo rookeries, prepared the manatees' lettuce meal and rescued an injured "whale" (an inflatable one). The bravest among us have taken the rigorous swimming test required for animal-trainer wannabes. It poured during the day, and our jeans got soaked.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2000 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before they were led to the Columbia orbiter, the 20 teachers had to remove or tape down their earrings, rings, bracelets and watches. They were entering a "foreign object debris" controlled area, where even a small piece of jewelry could damage the Columbia's highly sensitive, heat-resistant tiles, which can withstand 2,600 degrees. Small undetected objects could float in the spaceship when it travels at zero gravity, said Jim Morris, an industrial engineer at the Boeing Palmdale facility.
NEWS
April 18, 1999 | BETTIJANE LEVINE
Before you say nyet to a one-week, $19,000 vacation, consider this: You will be going where few have gone before, doing what few have done or will ever get to do. And you will be one small step ahead of all the puny wannabes who brag about their fast times at baseball, golf or Harley-riding camp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1995 | MICHAEL ARKUSH
Space may not be the final frontier for two teen-agers from Maclay Middle School. But space camp is on this summer's travel plans. Eighth-graders Alicia Ramos, 14, and Johnny Madrid, 13, will attend U.S. Space Camp in Huntsville, Ala., for a week in July. They earned the free trip with essays they wrote last winter in a contest sponsored by the Lockheed Corporate Management Assn. in Calabasas, part of the Lockheed Martin aerospace company, now based in Bethesda, Md.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1990 | ERIK HAMILTON
Yvonne Gilon's eyes sparkle when she talks about "ETs" and space travel. So it's understandable that the 13-year-old is a bit excited about attending the space agency's space camp next week in Huntsville, Ala. Gilon, who graduated this year from Marco F. Forster Junior High School in San Juan Capistrano with top honors, was one of 10 high school students picked nationwide to attend the seven-day camp, which is set to begin Saturday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1998 | EDWARD M. YOON
Eleven-year-old Spencer Lubitzwas all smiles Wednesday as team leader for an interactive space mission in search of a black hole. "That was a lot of fun," said Spencer, one of 96 youths participating in the first summer space adventure camp at Castlemont School in Woodland Hills. The four-week camp, which began June 22, consists of two parts--an imaginary trip to Mars followed by a mock journey into hyperspace, said Christy Reed, camp director.
BUSINESS
December 19, 1997 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Space Shuttle Atlantis is back in Palmdale for its three-year, 60-million-mile tuneup. When the 10-month, $70-million make-over at the Boeing Orbiter Major Modification Facility is complete, Atlantis will sport a state-of-the-art cockpit and a new navigation system that can be guided solely by Global Positioning System satellites.
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