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TRAVEL
May 22, 1994
This is the 25th anniversary of the first moon landing and the Apollo space program. In commemoration, "Celebration 25: Man on the Moon," at the Space Center Houston, continues through Labor Day with special anniversary attractions. "Spaceweek," July 16-24, will be a national anniversary celebration with astronaut appearances and a "Lunar Laser Spectacular" re-creating the moon landing. Admission to the center, 22 miles from Houston at Johnson Space Center, is $11.95, $8.
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NATIONAL
September 7, 2012 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON -- Sorry, Houston, you didn't get a space shuttle, but at least you'll get a glimpse of the last one to fly -- on its way to L.A. NASA's plans for delivering the retired shuttle Endeavour to its permanent home in California call for the orbiter to fly on the back of a Boeing 747 over parts of Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas and New Mexico, as well as landmarks in San Francisco and Sacramento, before landing at Los Angeles International...
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BUSINESS
June 11, 1991 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A space shuttle launch is, of course, an immensely technological and coordinated event. Visiting NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston as a tourist is, well, another matter. The free tour at the center, which has dozens of buildings in a campuslike setting, consists of showing visitors a modest museum and giving them maps so that they can find the handful of buildings open to the public. About 1 million people arrive each year and try not to get lost, but often do.
TRAVEL
May 28, 2006 | Dinah Eng, Special to The Times
Human space flight began 45 years ago when cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin blasted out of the Earth's atmosphere to orbit around the globe on April 12, 1961. It may be awhile before most buffs can book a flight into outer space, but there are plenty of destinations around the country where astronauts-at-heart can touch aviation history or learn if they've got the right stuff. Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, Washington The mother ship for space buffs.
TRAVEL
June 25, 1995 | EILEEN OGINTZ
Ask any kid old enough to talk: The more far out the attraction, the better. That goes for movies, theme park rides, clothes and just about anything even remotely educational. But sometimes it's not as hard as parents think to encourage a child's interest in something worthwhile. Take space. "Most kids are impressed with ghosts, dinosaurs and astronauts. There's something about being on the edge that gets children excited about space," said retired Air Force Lt. Gen.
NATIONAL
September 7, 2012 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON -- Sorry, Houston, you didn't get a space shuttle, but at least you'll get a glimpse of the last one to fly -- on its way to L.A. NASA's plans for delivering the retired shuttle Endeavour to its permanent home in California call for the orbiter to fly on the back of a Boeing 747 over parts of Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas and New Mexico, as well as landmarks in San Francisco and Sacramento, before landing at Los Angeles International...
TRAVEL
May 28, 2006 | Dinah Eng, Special to The Times
Human space flight began 45 years ago when cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin blasted out of the Earth's atmosphere to orbit around the globe on April 12, 1961. It may be awhile before most buffs can book a flight into outer space, but there are plenty of destinations around the country where astronauts-at-heart can touch aviation history or learn if they've got the right stuff. Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, Washington The mother ship for space buffs.
TRAVEL
August 16, 1992 | KIM UPTON
When Space Center Houston opens Oct. 16, it will be the first time the 1 million visitors who annually trek to the NASA/Johnson Space Center--where astronauts are trained and from which their life in space is monitored and directed--have an organized attraction to explore. Nearly five years of work went into the $70-million visitor center, which is designed to be a hands-on way to learn about the manned space program.
NATIONAL
September 22, 2005 | From Reuters
NASA ordered the evacuation of Johnson Space Center in Houston on Wednesday and turned over control of the International Space Station to its Russian partners as Hurricane Rita barreled across the Gulf of Mexico. Many of the space center's 15,000 government and contract workers had already left the facility by the time the evacuation order was given, heeding calls from Texas officials, NASA spokesman James Hartsfield said.
MAGAZINE
August 29, 1999 | JANET WISCOMBE, Janet Wiscombe is a frequent contributor to The Times who last wrote about professional beach volleyball for the magazine
Sally Ride doesn't look like a woman outrageous enough to sit on top of a stack of enormous flaming rockets. There's absolutely nothing about her refined appearance or manner to suggest she has the grit to travel into the great, dark, airless abyss strapped to the seat of a hurtling piece of machinery. She's small, reserved, a reluctant heroine uneasy with eminence, a self-possessed but distant star who navigates her rarefied universe with quiet control.
NATIONAL
September 22, 2005 | From Reuters
NASA ordered the evacuation of Johnson Space Center in Houston on Wednesday and turned over control of the International Space Station to its Russian partners as Hurricane Rita barreled across the Gulf of Mexico. Many of the space center's 15,000 government and contract workers had already left the facility by the time the evacuation order was given, heeding calls from Texas officials, NASA spokesman James Hartsfield said.
TRAVEL
June 25, 1995 | EILEEN OGINTZ
Ask any kid old enough to talk: The more far out the attraction, the better. That goes for movies, theme park rides, clothes and just about anything even remotely educational. But sometimes it's not as hard as parents think to encourage a child's interest in something worthwhile. Take space. "Most kids are impressed with ghosts, dinosaurs and astronauts. There's something about being on the edge that gets children excited about space," said retired Air Force Lt. Gen.
TRAVEL
May 22, 1994
This is the 25th anniversary of the first moon landing and the Apollo space program. In commemoration, "Celebration 25: Man on the Moon," at the Space Center Houston, continues through Labor Day with special anniversary attractions. "Spaceweek," July 16-24, will be a national anniversary celebration with astronaut appearances and a "Lunar Laser Spectacular" re-creating the moon landing. Admission to the center, 22 miles from Houston at Johnson Space Center, is $11.95, $8.
TRAVEL
August 16, 1992 | KIM UPTON
When Space Center Houston opens Oct. 16, it will be the first time the 1 million visitors who annually trek to the NASA/Johnson Space Center--where astronauts are trained and from which their life in space is monitored and directed--have an organized attraction to explore. Nearly five years of work went into the $70-million visitor center, which is designed to be a hands-on way to learn about the manned space program.
BUSINESS
June 11, 1991 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A space shuttle launch is, of course, an immensely technological and coordinated event. Visiting NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston as a tourist is, well, another matter. The free tour at the center, which has dozens of buildings in a campuslike setting, consists of showing visitors a modest museum and giving them maps so that they can find the handful of buildings open to the public. About 1 million people arrive each year and try not to get lost, but often do.
NEWS
March 1, 1989 | From United Press International
Jay Honeycutt, a NASA manager at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, has been named director of shuttle management and operations at the space center here, officials said Tuesday.
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