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April 2, 1991 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union has launched a sophisticated Earth-watching satellite that Soviet officials hope will help open an American market for Soviet space services, the head of the Soviet space agency and a U.S. marketing firm announced Monday. The 18.5-metric-ton Almaz-1 satellite, launched Sunday from a Soviet space base, will provide detailed optical and radar images of the Earth's surface to commercial clients, including the U.S.
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BUSINESS
April 2, 1991 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union has launched a sophisticated Earth-watching satellite that Soviet officials hope will help open an American market for Soviet space services, the head of the Soviet space agency and a U.S. marketing firm announced Monday. The 18.5-metric-ton Almaz-1 satellite, launched Sunday from a Soviet space base, will provide detailed optical and radar images of the Earth's surface to commercial clients, including the U.S.
BUSINESS
December 12, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A Houston-area company has signed a multimillion-dollar contract to have one of its employees fly as a "guest cosmonaut" aboard the Soviet space station Mir. Space Commerce Corp. President Art Dula confirmed Tuesday that he had negotiated the deal with the Soviet Union. The company, which Dula declined to identify, will pay more than the $12 million the Tokyo Broadcasting Service was charged to put a reporter in space for eight days.
NEWS
December 18, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The official Soviet news agency said today that a telephone sweepstakes offering an American a chance to travel to the Soviet space station was a hoax. Glavkosmos, the Soviet equivalent of NASA, said it did not know anything about the project, Soviet officials told Tass. Vladimir Zenkin, deputy commercial manager at the Energia agency, said there are no deals to allow an American to spend a week on the space station Mir in 1992 or 1993.
NEWS
May 16, 1987 | United Press International
A representative of the U.S. satellite industry said Friday that the Soviet Union may be paid to launch American satellites into space as early as next year. Arthur Dula, who heads Space Commerce Corp. and is acting as an intermediary between the Soviets and American satellite companies, said he hopes to begin putting American satellites on Russian launch vehicles by the end of 1988.
NEWS
November 16, 1989 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union and an American company agreed to a $54-million deal Wednesday in which U.S.-made satellites would be launched into orbit with Soviet spacecraft or rockets for the first time. The agreement remains far from certain, however, because the U.S. government has banned the export of satellites to the Soviet Union. While not completely ruling out the possibility that the satellites could be exported, one State Department official on Wednesday said it seemed unlikely. "U.S.
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