Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSpace Communications Corp
IN THE NEWS

Space Communications Corp

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
May 26, 1989 | DAVID OLMOS
Ford Aerospace Corp.'s newest commercial satellite, the Superbird, is scheduled to be placed into orbit for the first time today when two of them, configured as communications satellites, will be carried aloft aboard a European Ariane 4A rocket launched from French Guiana. Susan Pearce, spokeswoman for Newport Beach-based Ford Aerospace, said the satellites will be used by their Japanese owner for video distribution, satellite news gathering, private business networks and, in the future, possibly for high-definition television.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
May 26, 1989 | DAVID OLMOS
Ford Aerospace Corp.'s newest commercial satellite, the Superbird, is scheduled to be placed into orbit for the first time today when two of them, configured as communications satellites, will be carried aloft aboard a European Ariane 4A rocket launched from French Guiana. Susan Pearce, spokeswoman for Newport Beach-based Ford Aerospace, said the satellites will be used by their Japanese owner for video distribution, satellite news gathering, private business networks and, in the future, possibly for high-definition television.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
August 28, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
PanAmSat Corp. stock fell as much as 17% after a Boeing Co. rocket exploded following takeoff Wednesday night at Cape Canaveral, Fla., destroying PanAmSat's Galaxy X telecommunications satellite. Shares of PanAmSat, which is 81%-owned by General Motors Corp.'s Hughes Electronics division, plunged $7.31 to close at $42.25 on Nasdaq trading of 417,200, more than twice the three-month daily average. The drop reduced the firm's market value by $1.
BUSINESS
March 2, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
General Motors Corp.'s Hughes Electronics stands to collect $150 million in damages after the U.S. Supreme Court rejected a government appeal in a fight over patented technology used to help orient satellites. The high court decision likely marks the final chapter in a marathon legal fight dating to 1973. El Segundo-based Hughes, the world's largest satellite maker, charged that the government used its patented technology without permission from 1963 to 1982.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1998 | RUSS LOAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
During the workweek, Don Albrecht travels deep into the arcane world of complex computer languages, creating software to test various functions of communications satellites. It is a highly cerebral activity. When pressed for an explanation, Albrecht explains that one such computer program measures "S parameter response versus frequency, two-carrier intermodulation, noise figure and swept power for gain expansion."
NATIONAL
December 19, 2008 | Dan Morain and Andrew Zajac
Hoping to allay conflict-of-interest concerns as his wife prepares to become secretary of State, President Clinton released a donor list Thursday that shows he has raised as much as $131 million from foreign governments -- including Saudi Arabia, Dubai and Norway -- for the William J. Clinton Foundation. More than 200,000 patrons that have given nearly $500 million since the foundation's inception in 1997 were identified by name only.
NEWS
May 23, 2000 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL and ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When Sen. Arlen Specter recently obtained the internal Justice Department memo of former campaign finance task force chief Charles G. LaBella, the Pennsylvania Republican used it to resurrect a favorite partisan target: President Clinton's approval for Loral Space and Communications Corp. to launch a satellite from China two years ago. At the time, Loral Chairman Bernard L. Schwartz was among the Democratic Party's biggest individual donors.
NEWS
June 4, 2001 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three years ago, Republicans in Congress launched a ferocious attack on President Clinton for approving the export of satellites to China in a way they said harmed America's security. Now, with a Republican in the White House and a satellite industry complaining of lost business, Washington is singing a different tune. Amid the furor of the late 1990s, the Republican Congress enacted legislation making it harder for companies to win government approval of satellite exports.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|