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NEWS
October 1, 1999 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
NASA lost its $125-million Mars Climate Orbiter because spacecraft engineers failed to convert from English to metric measurements when exchanging vital data before the craft was launched, space agency officials said Thursday.
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BUSINESS
December 26, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
China watched this month as the nation's first lunar rover rolled across the moon's surface. It was a moment of national pride when images of the six-wheel rover, dubbed Jade Rabbit, were transmitted live back to Earth, showing the red and gold Chinese flag on the moon for the first time. "Now as Jade Rabbit has made its touchdown on the moon surface," the state-run Xinhua news agency said, "the whole world again marvels at China's remarkable space capabilities. " The lunar triumph offered many Americans their first glimpse at an unfolding new space race involving countries with emerging economies.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1998
Until this century, we could only observe space from Earth, but in 1957, the first man-made satellite was launched. Now, we explore other planets with robotic vehicles and astronauts live in a space station. Scientists also scan the heavens using powerful telescopes to learn about planets, comets, asteroids, nebulas, stars and other galaxies. To learn more about space exploration, use the direct links on The Times Launch Point Web site: http://www.latimes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
NASA's extraterrestrial smartphone has phoned home. The 4-inch-square satellite, PhoneSat 2.4, which uses an off-the-shelf Samsung Nexus S phone running Google's Android operating system, transmitted data back to its Santa Clara University ground station, the space agency announced last week. As the number implies, this is not the first smartphone NASA has hurled into orbit. The first, in April, proved the concept of using commercially available electronics for satellites in low-Earth orbit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 2012 | By Scott Gold, Los Angeles Times
WATERTON CANYON, Colo. - The concrete-floored room looks, at first glance, like little more than a garage. There is a red tool chest, its drawers labeled: "Hacksaws. " "Allen wrenches. " There are stepladders and vise grips. There is also, at one end of the room, a half-built spaceship, and everyone is wearing toe-to-fingertip protective suits. "Don't. Touch. Anything. " Bruce Jakosky says the words politely but tautly, like a protective father - which, effectively, he is. Jakosky is the principal investigator behind NASA's next mission to Mars, putting him in the vanguard of an arcane niche of science: planetary protection - the science of exploring space without messing it up. PHOTOS: Stunning images of Earth at night As NASA pursues the search for life in the solar system, the cleanliness of robotic explorers is crucial to avoid contaminating other worlds.
OPINION
February 9, 2003
Re "Uncertain Science in Orbit," Feb. 5: NASA should be directed to conduct only unmanned space exploration. It is cheaper, less complex and will not involve the loss of life. The ongoing Columbia accident investigation boards will come up with some safety recommendations for future space missions. Eventually NASA will drift back into its pre-Columbia ways, there will be another catastrophic accident, and the cycle will repeat itself. The best solution is unmanned space flight. Ronald Hart Palmdale How is it that less than a week after the Columbia disaster an inquiry is up and running, but almost a year and a half later the Bush administration is still dragging its feet over the Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1997 | LEE HARRIS
Here's the rundown on guests and topics for the weekend's public-affairs programs: Today "Saturday Journal": 5 a.m. C-SPAN. "Evans & Novak": Marion Barry, mayor of Washington, D.C., 2:30 p.m., repeats Sunday, 7 a.m. CNN. "John McLaughlin's One on One": Michael Bloomberg, 2:30 p.m. (28). "Tony Brown's Journal": roots of music featuring black hymns, slave songs, 3:30 p.m. (28). "Inside Politics Weekend": 3:30 p.m.; repeats midnight CNN. "Capital Gang Saturday": Rep. Steny Hoyer (D-Md.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2007 | From Reuters
Space Exploration Technologies Corp., a start-up seeking to slash the cost of coursing through the cosmos, has been granted a five-year license to launch rockets from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, the Air Force said. The approval could help El Segundo-based SpaceX, as the privately held company is known, compete with Orbital Sciences Corp., which develops small space systems, and later with the bigger rockets of Europe's Arianspace and the United Launch Alliance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2001
Re "Longest-Serving NASA Chief to Quit," Oct. 18: Let us hope that whoever succeeds outgoing NASA administrator Daniel S. Goldin will continue to pursue interplanetary space exploration with the same enthusiasm that he did. Specifically, NASA should commit itself to sending a man-made probe on a fly-by mission to Pluto. The importance of exploring Pluto cannot be overstated. It is the only planet in our solar system discovered by an American, but it remains the only one not yet visited by a U.S. spacecraft.
OPINION
July 16, 2008
Re "Rock analysis turns up evidence of moon water," July 10 I am not surprised by this news of ancient water on the moon. The knowledge about our universe accumulated by NASA and space researchers over the last 50 years has completely revised our image of the cosmos. In the early 1950s, most people thought that most of the observable universe was an empty void where very little had been happening. We have since learned that water is probably one of the most common resources in our solar systems and that almost every planet and moon had, or now has, deposits of water in one form or another.
SCIENCE
July 18, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
More than a hundred explorers, scientists and government officials will gather at Long Beach's Aquarium of the Pacific on Friday to draft a blueprint to solve a deep blue problem: About 95% of the world's oceans remains unexplored. The invitation-only forum , hosted by the aquarium and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, aims to identify priorities, technologies and collaborative strategies that could advance understanding of the uncharted mega-wilderness that humans rely on for oxygen, food, medicines, commerce and recreation.
SCIENCE
June 12, 2013 | By Brad Balukjian
Dancer , rapper , and, oh yeah, Man on the Moon Buzz Aldrin is talking, but are the right people listening? One of the original moonwalkers (“Michael Jackson always did it backwards!” Aldrin complained) challenged the United States to pick up the space slack Tuesday evening, mere hours after China sent three astronauts into orbit. Speaking in front of a friendly crowd of 880 at the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum in Yorba Linda, Aldrin criticized the U.S. for not adequately leading the international community in space exploration, and suggested that we bump up our federal investment in space while still encouraging the private sector's efforts.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2013 | By Holly Myers
It will come as news to many, no doubt, that there is a Warhol on the moon. And a Rauschenberg and an Oldenburg - a whole "Moon Museum," in fact, containing the work of six artists in all, in the form of drawings inscribed on the surface of a ceramic chip roughly the size of a thumbprint. Conceived by the artist Forrest Myers in 1969, the chip was fabricated in collaboration with scientists at Bell Laboratories and illicitly slipped by a willing engineer between some sheets of insulation on the Apollo 12 lander module.
WORLD
January 29, 2013 | By Patrick J. McDonnell and Ramin Mostaghim, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
BEIRUT - U.S. officials are not exactly welcoming Iran's revelation this week that the Islamic Republic has sent a monkey into space and brought the creature back to Earth safely. The report by Iranian media recalled for many the early days of space flight, when both the United States and the Soviet Union launched animal-bearing spacecraft as a prelude to human space travel. But State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland told reporters in Washington on Monday that the reported mission raises concerns about possible Iranian violations of a United Nations  ban on development of ballistic missiles capable of delivering nuclear weapons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 2012 | By Scott Gold, Los Angeles Times
WATERTON CANYON, Colo. - The concrete-floored room looks, at first glance, like little more than a garage. There is a red tool chest, its drawers labeled: "Hacksaws. " "Allen wrenches. " There are stepladders and vise grips. There is also, at one end of the room, a half-built spaceship, and everyone is wearing toe-to-fingertip protective suits. "Don't. Touch. Anything. " Bruce Jakosky says the words politely but tautly, like a protective father - which, effectively, he is. Jakosky is the principal investigator behind NASA's next mission to Mars, putting him in the vanguard of an arcane niche of science: planetary protection - the science of exploring space without messing it up. PHOTOS: Stunning images of Earth at night As NASA pursues the search for life in the solar system, the cleanliness of robotic explorers is crucial to avoid contaminating other worlds.
SCIENCE
December 6, 2012 | By Amina Khan and Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
Years of trying to do too many things with too little money have put NASA at risk of ceding leadership in space exploration to other nations, according to a new report that calls on the space agency to make wrenching decisions about its long-term strategy and future scope. As other countries - including some potential adversaries - are investing heavily in space, federal funding for NASA is essentially flat and under constant threat of being cut. Without a clear vision, that fiscal uncertainty makes it all the more difficult for the agency to make progress on ambitious goals like sending astronauts to an asteroid or Mars while executing big-ticket science missions, such as the $8.8-billion James Webb Space Telescope, says the analysis released Wednesday by the National Research Council.
OPINION
July 28, 2008
Re "Looking at Mars," editorial, July 23 Once again, I must disagree with your editorial on the future of spaceflight and your continued opposition to human exploration. Although robots have their uses in going places where it is currently impossible to send humans, human spaceflight has many advantages, such as the ability to explore on a hunch and the ability to conduct in-flight repairs. There is also the inherent desire to travel to new places and literally "go where no man has gone before."
SCIENCE
December 6, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel
What should the future of our space program be? The National Research Council had unpleasant medicine for NASA in its just-released report on the vision and direction of the agency. A panel of 12 independent experts concluded, among other things, that the program lacks clear direction from the White House and Congress about what its goals should be, and that NASA cannot do everything it aims to without more money. More cash is an unlikely prospect in the current economic climate, the panel also said.
NEWS
September 22, 2012 | By Seema Mehta
As Paul D. Ryan campaigned near Florida's Space Coast, Mitt Romney on Saturday released a plan for space exploration that said remaining the global  leader in that arena is vital for the nation's economic and security needs. With an eye toward impressing crucial Florida voters, Romney and his running mate also argued that President Obama  has allowed the nation's space dominance to erode. "He has put the space program on a path where we're conceding our position as the unequivocal leader in space," Ryan said in Orlando on Saturday, the Associated Press reported.
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