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Space Exploration Technologies Corp

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BUSINESS
March 2, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
At a launchpad in Cape Canaveral sits a spaceship atop an 18-story rocket that NASA officials hope will be the first privately built craft to dock with the International Space Station. On Thursday, the company that manufactures the spacecraft, Space Exploration Technologies Corp., performed a successful launch readiness test for its upcoming flight - an important step on the road to the space station. The company, better known as SpaceX, posted the news on its Twitter page about fueling its Falcon 9 rocket with rocket-grade kerosene and liquid oxygen as it stood vertical at its launch complex.
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BUSINESS
April 18, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan and Andrea Chang
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on Friday and sped through a cloud-covered sky on its way to deliver supplies to the International Space Station for NASA. The Hawthorne-based rocket manufacturer launched the cargo mission despite a computer glitch aboard the space station and bad weather that threatened to push the liftoff back a day. Promptly at 12:25 p.m. PDT, the rocket fired up its nine engines and launched into orbit, carrying a capsule packed with 5,000 pounds of supplies for the two American, one Japanese and three Russian astronauts aboard the space station.
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BUSINESS
January 24, 2011 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
After becoming the first private company ever to blast a spacecraft into Earth orbit and have it return intact last month, Hawthorne rocket maker Space Exploration Technologies Corp. is pushing toward its next big step. The company known as SpaceX wants to be the first commercial firm to launch astronauts into outer space and has submitted a proposal to NASA. SpaceX wants in on the potentially multibillion-dollar job of ferrying astronauts to and from the International Space Station after the space shuttle is retired this year.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
A high-stakes battle is underway in Washington over launching the U.S. government's most sophisticated national security satellites. Space entrepreneur Elon Musk is pitted against the nation's two largest weapons makers, Boeing Co. and Lockheed Martin Corp., in a fight for military contracts worth as much as $70 billion through 2030. For eight years, the Pentagon has paid Boeing and Lockheed - operating jointly as United Launch Alliance - to launch the government's pricey spy satellites without seeking competitive bids.
BUSINESS
June 7, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
The gig: Gwynne Shotwell, 49, is president and chief operating officer of SpaceX, the Hawthorne company that builds rockets and space capsules to resupply the International Space Station for NASA. Shotwell is No. 2 at the pioneering company behind founder and chief executive Elon Musk. She is responsible for day-to-day operations and managing customer relationships and company growth. Shotwell, with a sunny demeanor and a blunt way of speaking, is often responsible for updating the media on SpaceX's missions while they're happening.
BUSINESS
March 26, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
About 150 employees at rocket engine maker Aerojet Rocketdyne in Canoga Park were told Wednesday that they would be laid off as part of a companywide reduction that the company says is related to last year's merger. Aerojet Rocketdyne was created by the sale of Rocketdyne to GenCorp Inc. for $550 million, a deal that was finalized last summer. It brought together two major California rocket companies - and longtime competitors. GenCorp already owned Aerojet, the Sacramento aerospace firm founded in 1942.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2007 | From Reuters
Space Exploration Technologies Corp., a start-up seeking to slash the cost of coursing through the cosmos, has been granted a five-year license to launch rockets from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, the Air Force said. The approval could help El Segundo-based SpaceX, as the privately held company is known, compete with Orbital Sciences Corp., which develops small space systems, and later with the bigger rockets of Europe's Arianspace and the United Launch Alliance.
BUSINESS
December 20, 2005 | Peter Pae, Times Staff Writer
The would-be maiden launch of a new rocket designed to sharply cut the cost of lifting satellites into orbit was postponed again Monday because of a "structural issue" with its first-stage tank. The initial flight of Falcon I rocket has been rescheduled for early next year, El Segundo-based Space Exploration Technologies Corp. said. The fledgling company, also known as SpaceX, was founded by Silicon Valley entrepreneur Elon Musk.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan
SpaceX , the Hawthorne firm that became the first private company to visit the International Space Station, in May, produced a video to highlight the historic mission. The video, below, is chock-full of dramatic rock music, images and sounds from the mission, including: May 22: SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket launched the Dragon spacecraft into orbit from Cape Canaveral, Fla. May 23: Dragon orbited Earth as it traveled toward the space station. May 24: Dragon's onboard sensors and flight systems were subjected to a series of tests.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2010 | W.J. Hennigan
In the historic launch of its Dragon space capsule Wednesday, Hawthorne-based rocket venture SpaceX didn't carry astronauts or cargo into orbit. But it did transport a wheel of LeBrouere cheese. The company, formally known as Space Exploration Technologies Corp., revealed Thursday that it lifted a secret payload into low Earth orbit aboard its cone-shaped Dragon spacecraft. SpaceX said the choice was a nod to the British comedy troupe Monty Python's Flying Circus and its famous Cheese Shop skit.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - Private space companies, such as SpaceX in Hawthorne, would get a local property tax break on launch vehicles, fuel, satellites and other gear under a bill approved overwhelmingly Thursday by the state Senate. The proposal, AB 777 by Assemblyman Al Muratsuchi (D-Torrance), would create the exemption from local property taxes for a 10-year period that would end Jan. 1, 2024. Legislation is needed to modernize the state's tax code to encourage companies such as billionaire Elon Musk's SpaceX to build their rockets and spacecraft in California, Muratsuchi said.
BUSINESS
March 26, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
About 150 employees at rocket engine maker Aerojet Rocketdyne in Canoga Park were told Wednesday that they would be laid off as part of a companywide reduction that the company says is related to last year's merger. Aerojet Rocketdyne was created by the sale of Rocketdyne to GenCorp Inc. for $550 million, a deal that was finalized last summer. It brought together two major California rocket companies - and longtime competitors. GenCorp already owned Aerojet, the Sacramento aerospace firm founded in 1942.
BUSINESS
March 9, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - California lawmakers for years have been battling ravenous metal thieves, who pull copper wires out of street lights, grab rebar from construction sites, and steal pumps and other costly equipment from farmers' fields. Now, a bipartisan group of legislators led by Assemblyman Brian Nestande (R-Palm Desert), is trying to put more manpower and money into the fight. Nestande's bill, AB 2313, would create a metal theft task force within the attorney general's office that would provide grants to local police and prosecutors.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
Los Angeles billionaire Elon Musk, chief executive of Hawthorne rocket maker SpaceX, testified before Congress that the U.S. Air Force and other agencies are paying too high a price to launch its most valuable satellites into orbit. The government pays billions to a sole provider to launch nearly all of its spy satellites and other high-profile spacecraft, without seeking competitive bids. That provider is United Launch Alliance, a joint venture of aerospace behemoths Lockheed Martin Corp.
BUSINESS
February 25, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
It's not the apocalypse. It just looks like that. Every few weeks, bright streaks and colorful, rolling waves appear in the California sky. They can startle those unfamiliar with their source, spurring speculation of aliens or apocalyptic visions. But the secret behind the heavenly artwork is much more mundane: frozen fuel exhaust crystals -- the trails of rocket launches from Vandenberg Air Force Base - combined with nature. Vandenberg, on California's Central Coast between Lompoc and Santa Maria, has been the site of military space projects for more than half a century.
BUSINESS
December 13, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
Hawthorne rocket maker SpaceX is a step closer to taking over NASA's most historic launchpad, where the mighty Saturn V rocket made its moonshot and where the first space shuttle rumbled to life. The space agency confirmed Friday that it has chosen SpaceX to begin negotiations on a lease to operate Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.  The pad is where Apollo 11 lifted off in 1969 en route to the first manned moon landing. It is also where the first space shuttle mission in 1981 and the last mission in 2011 were launched.
BUSINESS
October 7, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan
A towering white rocket blasted off from Cape Canaveral, Fla. and sped toward the International Space Station in a resupply mission that heralds a new era for NASA. SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket launched at 5:35 p.m. PDT Sunday from Space Launch Complex 40, carrying a Dragon capsule packed with 1,000 pounds of food, experiments and supplies. The spacecraft is expected to reach the space station Wednesday. Space Exploration Technologies Corp., better known as SpaceX, is aiming to become the first private company to resupply the space station on a contracted mission for NASA.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2013 | By Roger Vincent
Historic Old Pasadena, a restored section of the city's downtown bustling with shops and restaurants, is getting more high-tech. Three older buildings at a busy intersection on Raymond Avenue will be transformed into a hub for budding technology firms in a real estate development backed by a prominent Silicon Valley entrepreneur and investor. David Sacks, who was instrumental in the launch of two $1-billion Internet companies, has joined Los Angeles developer Rising Realty Partners in a project to turn three century-old buildings into offices for tech firms.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2013 | By Roger Vincent
Historic Old Pasadena, a restored section of the city's downtown bustling with shops and restaurants, is getting more high-tech. Three older buildings at a busy intersection on Raymond Avenue will be transformed into a hub for budding technology firms in a real estate development backed by a prominent Silicon Valley entrepreneur and investor. David Sacks, who was instrumental in the launch of two $1-billion Internet companies, has joined Los Angeles developer Rising Realty Partners in a project to turn three century-old buildings into offices for tech firms.
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