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NEWS
January 15, 2000 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever since the John F. Kennedy administration launched the world's first spy satellite, only senior U.S. military officials and policymakers have been allowed to view high-altitude, high-resolution images of everything from Soviet bombers to Serb tanks. Now the public is getting its chance, and some policy analysts say that's cause for concern.
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NEWS
June 13, 2000 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Since January, John Pike has been taking his own satellite pictures of the world's most secret military bases and then making them public on the Internet. The images and the debate they have provoked are an experiment in the high technology of democracy, for anyone now can share a view from orbit once reserved solely for those with the highest of superpower security clearances.
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NEWS
June 13, 2000 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Since January, John Pike has been taking his own satellite pictures of the world's most secret military bases and then making them public on the Internet. The images and the debate they have provoked are an experiment in the high technology of democracy, for anyone now can share a view from orbit once reserved solely for those with the highest of superpower security clearances.
NEWS
January 15, 2000 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever since the John F. Kennedy administration launched the world's first spy satellite, only senior U.S. military officials and policymakers have been allowed to view high-altitude, high-resolution images of everything from Soviet bombers to Serb tanks. Now the public is getting its chance, and some policy analysts say that's cause for concern.
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