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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1995
NASA chief administrator Daniel Goldin on Friday encouraged top aerospace and defense contractors in the area to pour more money into research so they can remain competitive as federal contracts become scarcer and products must be marketed to the private sector. Goldin told a Downey gathering of aerospace and defense executives, civic leaders and state representatives that "as funds become tight, there's going to be more and more competition."
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WORLD
July 2, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
The Russian Proton-M rocket that blew up seconds after blastoff Tuesday destroyed three satellites worth $200 million, spurred authorities to indefinitely delay two other launches this month and damaged the image of Russia's lucrative commercial space industry. The rocket, which appeared to stall and roll about 10 seconds after it was launched, also spewed 600 tons of toxic fuel across the launch pad and surrounding steppe of the Baikonur facility in Kazakhstan, raising fears of contamination and further strain in Moscow's relationship with its former Soviet sister republic.
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NEWS
June 19, 1993 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The space shuttle Endeavour is scheduled to blast off from Florida's Kennedy Space Center at 6:38 a.m. PDT Sunday, carrying a payload that will inch the nation closer to the elusive goal of developing a commercial space industry. Workers tried to pinpoint the source of a helium leak in the shuttle's engine compartment on Friday afternoon, but the problem was not considered serious and is not expected to delay the launch, NASA officials said.
BUSINESS
June 7, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
The gig: Gwynne Shotwell, 49, is president and chief operating officer of SpaceX, the Hawthorne company that builds rockets and space capsules to resupply the International Space Station for NASA. Shotwell is No. 2 at the pioneering company behind founder and chief executive Elon Musk. She is responsible for day-to-day operations and managing customer relationships and company growth. Shotwell, with a sunny demeanor and a blunt way of speaking, is often responsible for updating the media on SpaceX's missions while they're happening.
BUSINESS
June 7, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
The gig: Gwynne Shotwell, 49, is president and chief operating officer of SpaceX, the Hawthorne company that builds rockets and space capsules to resupply the International Space Station for NASA. Shotwell is No. 2 at the pioneering company behind founder and chief executive Elon Musk. She is responsible for day-to-day operations and managing customer relationships and company growth. Shotwell, with a sunny demeanor and a blunt way of speaking, is often responsible for updating the media on SpaceX's missions while they're happening.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1992 | TERRIL JONES, ASSOCIATED PRESS
At a time when many of Europe's companies are scaling back, its booming space industry is looking for new worlds to conquer. The bullish spirit was evident here this week as European space officials launched International Space Year. Experts from around the world are to collaborate in 1992 on satellite-provided data that will help them understand and manage ozone depletion, deforestation, climatic changes and natural disasters.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2003 | Josh Friedman, Times Staff Writer
In his native South Africa, science whiz Elon Musk struck his first business deal when he made $500 selling the code for a "Space Invaders"-style video game he invented. He was 12. It took only another decade or so for him to make some real money: By age 23 Musk had his first significant company in Web software maker Zip2. He banked $22 million when he sold it in 1999 to Compaq Computer. And last year, he pocketed about $150 million in EBay Inc.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
For the last half-century, space flight has been the domain of the world's superpowers. All that is set to change as soon as Saturday when SpaceX, the private rocket company in Hawthorne, will attempt to launch a spaceship with cargo into orbit and three days later dock it with the International Space Station. If successful, the mission could mean a major shift in the way the U.S. government handles space exploration. Instead of keeping space travel a closely guarded government function, NASA has already begun hiring privately funded start-up companies for spacecraft development and is moving toward eventually outsourcing NASA space missions.
BUSINESS
February 27, 1988 | From Reuters
The nation's oil capital, learning to live with cheaper oil, has decided it now wants to be America's space capital in fact, not just in name. As the home of the Johnson Space Center, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's base for manned flights, Houston has always claimed the title "Space City U.S.A." But until the oil price slump, space played a small role in Houston's economic scheme.
NEWS
July 4, 1994 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kim Garvey, an engineer at McDonnell Douglas Corp. in Huntington Beach, well remembers her seventh birthday. It was July 20, 1969--the day of the first moon landing. "I can remember no one was paying any attention to me on my birthday," she recalls. "Everybody was watching TV." Now on the verge of her 32nd birthday and the 25th anniversary of the Apollo 11 lunar mission, Garvey works on the team designing the proposed space station, including the trusses that would form the station's backbone.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
For the last half-century, space flight has been the domain of the world's superpowers. All that is set to change as soon as Saturday when SpaceX, the private rocket company in Hawthorne, will attempt to launch a spaceship with cargo into orbit and three days later dock it with the International Space Station. If successful, the mission could mean a major shift in the way the U.S. government handles space exploration. Instead of keeping space travel a closely guarded government function, NASA has already begun hiring privately funded start-up companies for spacecraft development and is moving toward eventually outsourcing NASA space missions.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan
California is at risk of losing aerospace companies to other states if it doesn't become more business-friendly, according to Stuart Witt, general manager of the Mojave Air and Space Port. Speaking at NextGen Suborbital Research Conference , a commercial space conference in Palo Alto, Witt said that California politicians need to do more so other states don't lure the emerging commercial space industry away from the Southland. Just last August, aerospace giant Northrop Grumman Corp.moved its corporate headquarters from Century City to Falls Church , Va. The company joined an exodus of military companies -- including Lockheed Martin Corp., Science Applications International Corp.
NEWS
January 27, 2012 | By Maeve Reston
Taking his campaign to Florida's space coast, Mitt Romney used the backdrop of an obsolete space module that once flew on the shuttle to call for a “new mission” for the U.S. space program and to accuse President Obama of failing to spur job growth as NASA initiatives have been scaled back. But the former Massachusetts governor offered few specifics about what that mission would be or how his approach would differ from President Obama's - beyond assembling a group to discuss the possible ideas.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2011 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Work is quietly underway in the South Bay on a massive 22-story rocket whose power is rivaled in the U.S. only by the mighty Saturn V rocket, which took man to the moon, in a risky private venture that could herald a new era in space flight. Dubbed Falcon Heavy, the 27-engine booster is being assembled by rocket maker Space Exploration Technologies Corp., or SpaceX, at its sprawling complex in Hawthorne where it has about 1,100 workers. The rocket, which has twice the lifting capability of the next largest launcher built by a U.S. company, is being announced Tuesday at the National Press Club in Washington.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2009 | Dana Hedgpeth and Kendra Marr, Hedgpeth and Marr write for the Washington Post.
Forty years after the crew of Apollo 11 landed on the moon, the business of space has yet to experience the renaissance many once thought possible. "It's 2009, and we thought we'd be going to the moon on PanAm by now," said John Pike, an analyst who follows the industry at think tank GlobalSecurity.org. "We thought the number of rockets that would be launched each year would be more and more and it would get cheaper and cheaper, but it didn't happen that way."
OPINION
October 4, 2007 | Kevin P. Chilton, Gen. Kevin P. Chilton, the commander of U.S. Strategic Command at Offutt Air Force Base in Nebraska, was the commander of Air Force Space Command at Peterson Air Force Base in Colorado from June 2006 until this week.
Fifty years ago today, the Soviet Union surprised the world by launching Sputnik, Earth's first artificial satellite, into orbit. The satellite's unfettered "flight" over our country and around the world brought home the Soviet threat for millions of Americans, and it motivated the United States to regain the technological upper hand through education, advanced science and civilian-military aerospace efforts.
NEWS
November 21, 1990 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sometime after Christmas, but before the spring thaw, the small staff of an arcane White House agency will finish work on a document that will help chart the future of America's beleaguered commercial space industry. The National Space Council, which was activated two years ago by President Bush to set goals for space exploration and development, is drafting a comprehensive policy that will seek to improve the fortunes of the faltering $1-billion-a-year commercial space industry.
BUSINESS
August 27, 2007 | From the Associated Press
As a female voice coos, "Welcome to space," six passengers in skintight spacesuits unbuckle their seat belts and somersault in zero gravity, occasionally peeking back at Earth through the private spaceship's large portholes. Virgin Galactic showed off this animated video promoting the weightless joys of commercial space travel at a trade show for experimental aircraft last month.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2006 | From the Associated Press
It took help from the U.S. Postal Service to jump-start the nation's commercial aviation industry in the late 1920s and early 1930s. NASA Administrator Michael Griffin thinks a little push from government could do the same for the commercial space industry in the next several years. The space agency is sponsoring a competition in which winning companies will get $500 million in seed money to develop space vehicles that NASA will never design, build or own.
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