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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By David Ng
The Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum - one of Washington's most reliable tourist attractions - is receiving a $30-million gift from Boeing and will use the money to renovate its main exhibition space that serves as home to such icons of aviation as the Wright Brothers' airplane and Charles Lindbergh's Spirit of St. Louis. Officials at the Smithsonian made the announcement Thursday, saying that the renovation is expected to be completed in 2016, the museum's 40th anniversary.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By David Ng
The Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum - one of Washington's most reliable tourist attractions - is receiving a $30-million gift from Boeing and will use the money to renovate its main exhibition space that serves as home to such icons of aviation as the Wright Brothers' airplane and Charles Lindbergh's Spirit of St. Louis. Officials at the Smithsonian made the announcement Thursday, saying that the renovation is expected to be completed in 2016, the museum's 40th anniversary.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2008 | Adam Bernstein, Washington Post
Donald S. Lopez, a World War II fighter ace who became a test pilot and spacecraft engineer and had a significant role in planning the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, died Monday at the Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.C., after a heart attack. He was 84. Retired Marine Gen. John R. "Jack" Dailey, the museum's current director, said Lopez "spent the first half of his life making history and the second half commemorating it."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2014 | By Mike Boehm
This post has been updated. Please see below for details. David J. Skorton, a cardiologist who's spent the past decade as president of Cornell University and the University of Iowa, will be the next head of the Smithsonian Institution starting in July 2015. Skorton, 64, will be the first physician to serve as secretary of the Smithsonian, a federal department that runs a diverse array of cultural sites and research programs literally extending from A (eight museums and galleries devoted to art and design)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2003 | Jacqueline Trescott, Washington Post
Curators at the National Air and Space Museum are wrestling with the delicate question of how to present the Challenger and Columbia tragedies. Specifically, should an exhibition on the space shuttle include pieces of wreckage? Doing so would be a departure for the museum. Until now the tragedies of airplane and space travel have been dealt with briefly -- as concise mentions in explanatory panels or the display of simple artifacts, such as a crew patch.
NEWS
August 8, 1986 | United Press International
Walter Boyne, director of the National Air and Space Museum since 1983, will resign later this month to concentrate on promoting his novel about Air Force life, the Smithsonian Institution announced Thursday. Boyne, 57, served in the Air Force for 22 years.
NATIONAL
March 16, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
The Smithsonian Institution named the president of Georgia Tech as the new leader of the museum complex beleaguered by financial scandals. G. Wayne Clough, an engineer by training, will become the 12th secretary of the world's largest museum and research complex on July 1, assuming control of an institution that has been in turmoil in the last year. Clough, 66, called the institution "a treasure" and "a great integrator of knowledge" from different subject areas. The Smithsonian, which includes the National Zoo and the National Air and Space Museum, has much in common with a university, Clough said.
NATIONAL
December 18, 2008 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
NASA is telling museums that covet a retired space shuttle that it's going to cost them. How much? A mere $42 million -- including $6 million for shipping and handling. Too pricey? NASA also is offering shuttle main engines for anywhere between $400,000 and $800,000, plus shipping. The Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum in Washington is expected to get one shuttle after the craft are retired in 2010. The remaining two would be stored at Kennedy Space Center until their final homes were decided.
SCIENCE
November 2, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
The space shuttle Atlantis began its last voyage Friday morning, traveling 10 miles from Cape Kennedy's Vehicle Assembly Building to the Visitor Complex at the cape. Atlantis is the third and final active shuttle to be sent to a museum, and its transfer formally ends NASA's shuttle program. Once it arrives at the visitor center, Atlantis will be suspended upside down with its cargo bay doors open as though it were floating in space. The exhibit of Endeavour, which captivated Los Angeles during its move from LAX to the Discovery Science Center, officially opened Tuesday.
NATIONAL
September 6, 2012 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON -- The countdown has begun for delivery of the retired space shuttle Endeavour to Los Angeles, the last orbiter that will fly out of Kennedy Space Center in Florida atop a jet. L.A.'s welcome of the Endeavour is shaping up as splashier than Kennedy Space Center's farewell. L.A. is promising a marching band, among other fanfare, fitting for the spectacle of a space shuttle traveling through the city streets ; the program at Kennedy Space Center (expect speeches) is still being put together.
BUSINESS
February 14, 2014 | James Barragan
Bob Thompson fondly remembers when Downey was buzzing with pride and payrolls as a major hub for work on the Apollo space program and the construction site for six space shuttles. "Since the beginning of time, we had all these world leaders who looked up at the moon," said Thompson, a 72-year-old local history buff who worked for 34 years on the site where the spacecraft were built. "Here in Downey we built the vehicles that put the first man on the moon, and that is why it's a great source of pride.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2013 | By David Ng
The Smithsonian closed its doors Tuesday as parts of the federal government shut down after Congress failed to reach an agreement on spending, All Smithsonian museums, as well as the National Zoo in Washington, have closed until further notice.  Tuesday's shutdown affects all 18 Smithsonian organizations in Washington -- including the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden and the Air and Space Museum -- and two in New York. In addition, national monuments were also in the process of closing on Tuesday, according to reports.  CRITICS' PICKS: What to watch, where to go, what to eat On Monday, the Senate rejected the latest budget proposal from the House of Representatives.
SCIENCE
July 27, 2013 | By Monte Morin
Before they were sedated and loaded into the nose cone of a stubby Jupiter missile, the monkeys Able and Baker were just the latest in a growing number of rocket-test animals who, more often than not, met a violent end. But on May 25, 1959, after reaching the very edge of space about 60 miles above Earth's surface, the primates splashed down in the Atlantic Ocean, and were recovered by U.S. Navy frogmen. "Able/Baker perfect," came the radio message. "No injuries or other difficulties.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
This post has been corrected. Please see below for details. A historic archive documenting Alexander Graham Bell's attempt in the early 1900s to build a kite-like aircraft that would allow humans to fly was pulled back from an auctioneer's gavel in Westlake Village on Wednesday. The Smithsonian Institution and National Geographic Society joined Bell's heirs in challenging the archive's sale. They raised questions about whether the telephone inventor's family had voluntarily transferred the archive to a Smithsonian curator in the mid-1950s for his personal use. Profiles in History, a Calabasas auction house specializing in historical documents and Hollywood memorabilia, had estimated in the online auction catalog that the 217 pages of laboratory notes and more than 950 unpublished photographs documenting Bell's manned-flight experiments would fetch as much as $150,000 in the auction at the Hyatt Westlake Plaza hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2013 | By Liesl Bradner
Photographer Jeffrey Milstein has been fascinated with aviation and flying since he was a young boy building toy models. At 15 he would sweep hangar floors at the Santa Monica Airport on Sunday mornings in exchange for flying lessons. He passed his pilot's exam at 17. He remembers his father taking him to the end of the runway at Los Angeles International Airport to watch the planes land. "In those days it was DC3s and DC6s. There were no jets yet," said Milstein from his home in Woodstock, N.Y. "I loved standing right under them as they flew over my head.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2013 | By Kate Mather, Los Angeles Times
More than 1 million people have visited the California Science Center since space shuttle Endeavour made its debut just over four months ago, far surpassing officials' expectations for the Exposition Park museum. Science Center President Jeffrey Rudolph initially guessed about 2 million people would see the retired orbiter in its first year at the free museum, which averages about 1.6 million visitors per year. Now, he estimates at least 2.5 million people will pass through its turnstiles - a record.
SCIENCE
July 27, 2013 | By Monte Morin
Before they were sedated and loaded into the nose cone of a stubby Jupiter missile, the monkeys Able and Baker were just the latest in a growing number of rocket-test animals who, more often than not, met a violent end. But on May 25, 1959, after reaching the very edge of space about 60 miles above Earth's surface, the primates splashed down in the Atlantic Ocean, and were recovered by U.S. Navy frogmen. "Able/Baker perfect," came the radio message. "No injuries or other difficulties.
NATIONAL
April 17, 2012 | By Richard Simon
It was an extraordinary sight, even for Washington -- a space shuttle flying over the nation's capital atop a modified 747 on the way to its permanent new home, the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum. Crowds gathered on the National Mall, office workers peered out windows and motorists pulled to the side of the road to catch a glimpse of the retired Discovery orbiter , which made a sweep of the capital region, over the monuments, before landing at Dulles International Airport in northern Virginia.
SCIENCE
November 2, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
The space shuttle Atlantis began its last voyage Friday morning, traveling 10 miles from Cape Kennedy's Vehicle Assembly Building to the Visitor Complex at the cape. Atlantis is the third and final active shuttle to be sent to a museum, and its transfer formally ends NASA's shuttle program. Once it arrives at the visitor center, Atlantis will be suspended upside down with its cargo bay doors open as though it were floating in space. The exhibit of Endeavour, which captivated Los Angeles during its move from LAX to the Discovery Science Center, officially opened Tuesday.
NATIONAL
November 2, 2012 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON--The last of the retired space shuttles is headed for its final landing. Atlantis was making its 9.8-mile journey Friday from Florida's Kennedy Space Center to its permanent new home at the nearby visitors complex. "Godspeed Atlantis, on your next mission of inspiration and motivation," NASA Administrator Charles Bolden said. VIDEO: Timelapse journey of Endeavour "It's now NASA's honor to permanently house this magnificent spacecraft right here where she rose to the skies 33 times carrying 156 men and women," said Bolden, a former astronaut who flew on Atlantis.
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