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Space Overcrowding

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1985 | GEORGE RAMOS, Times Staff Writer
The delivery of an estimated 1.5 million letters was delayed for a day in parts of Los Angeles by an 8 1/2-hour power blackout that virtually halted operations at the downtown Terminal Annex Post Office, the largest mail operation in the West, officials said Friday. But flat packages, magazines and newspapers were not affected by the outage, termed by officials to be the biggest ever to hit Terminal Annex, which handles about 8.3 million pieces of mail daily. U.S.
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NEWS
December 16, 1990 | DAVID FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Full-time burglar and narcotics dealer Stephen Berkley can remember the good old days, way back in 1963, when the Los Angeles County Men's Central Jail first opened and a crook could almost see his reflection in cement floors so new that they shined. "Look at these scuff marks," said Berkley, 49. "Look at all these people. This place sure ain't what it used to be."
BUSINESS
May 4, 1987 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
Until last month, the major problem with Southern California's cellular telephone system was that it was too popular, with too many customers trying to cram their conversations onto too few frequencies. But with the activation five weeks ago of the region's second system, which virtually doubled available space, overcrowding is largely a problem of the past. And now, the cellular companies, which share the nation's largest and hottest mobile phone market, are fighting for new customers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1988 | LEONARD BERNSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
During the heady days of spring, when voter frustration over rampant growth was fueling Citizens for Limited Growth's petition-gathering campaign, co-Chairman Linda Martin confidently predicted that her organization's toughest task would be qualifying its two slow-growth initiatives for the Nov. 8 ballot. After that, voters fed up with traffic, vanishing open space and overcrowding would propel propositions D and J to victory, Martin predicted.
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