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Space Program Russia

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NEWS
December 16, 1995 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a potentially serious setback to the international space station program, Russia proposed Friday a redesign that would use its existing Mir spacecraft as the initial building block. The use of Mir would represent a major departure from existing plans to build the station from scratch. Such a change could be politically lethal, given the commitments made by the Clinton administration to Congress that the station design would not be changed.
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NEWS
December 16, 1995 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a potentially serious setback to the international space station program, Russia proposed Friday a redesign that would use its existing Mir spacecraft as the initial building block. The use of Mir would represent a major departure from existing plans to build the station from scratch. Such a change could be politically lethal, given the commitments made by the Clinton administration to Congress that the station design would not be changed.
NEWS
March 18, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid serious doubts over the future of what was the lavishly funded Soviet space program, Russia launched the first cosmonauts of its own on Tuesday and prepared for the return of a 33-year-old engineer parked in orbit since the Soviet Union's collapse. At 3:53 p.m. local time (2:53 a.m. PST), the Soyuz rocket carrying Cmdr. Alexander S. Viktorenko, flight engineer Alexander Y. Kaleri and a paying German guest--Maj.
WORLD
October 21, 2003 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
A Soyuz spaceship with a three-person crew, including two of the world's most experienced astronauts, docked successfully at the international space station Monday. With the American shuttle fleet grounded because of the February breakup of the space shuttle Columbia, the three-seat Russian Soyuz is the only means of ferrying crews to and from the orbiting station. A Soyuz is always attached to the station as an emergency escape vehicle.
NEWS
February 24, 2000 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Get ready for the taikonauts. At a secret training center somewhere in western Beijing, a handful of men hoping to become the first Chinese in space are learning how to deal with weightlessness, to combat claustrophobia and to navigate by starlight, as China makes its push to join the exclusive club of nations capable of sending humans into orbit.
NEWS
December 11, 1993 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Among the fading spacesuits, three-ton capsules and other Soviet space program artifacts to be sold to the highest bidder here today is a pair of dirty and mangled gloves valued at $1,500 to $2,000. The gloves were worn by cosmonaut Vasily G. Lazarev when a malfunctioning booster rocket aborted his April, 1975, mission, marooning him on a mountainside near China, where he managed to survive until he could be rescued.
NEWS
March 26, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sometime in the 1920s, futurist Yevgeny I. Zamyatin put his vision down on paper: On a vacant lot somewhere in the new Soviet state then being built, there would be two small shops, one selling sausage, the other tickets to Mars. For more than three generations, the Russian writer's brash dream seemed quite logical.
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