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October 2, 1996 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. space effort entered a new era Tuesday as McDonnell Douglas executives rolled open the doors of a huge new facility in Huntington Beach for assembling key components of the world's first orbiting space station. Completion of the five-story, 22,500-square-foot clean room--the largest dust-free manufacturing facility the company has ever built--"marks the transition" from design to actual production of U.S.
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NEWS
August 13, 2001 | USHA LEE McFARLING, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
It is the closest planet to the sun. A roasting crisp of a world where daytime temperatures reach 800 degrees. And yet, stretched across the surface of Mercury are what look to be patches of ice. It's one of the biggest mysteries of this little planet--a bookend of the solar system and one of our nearest neighbors. While Mercury was visited briefly once, by Mariner 10 in the mid-1970s, less than half of the planet was seen by the spacecraft's cameras.
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BUSINESS
October 2, 1996 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. space effort entered a new era Tuesday as McDonnell Douglas officials rolled open the doors of a huge new facility for assembling key components of the world's first orbiting space station. Completion of the five-story, 22,500-square-foot clean room--the largest dust-free manufacturing facility the company has ever built--"marks the transition" from design to actual production of U.S.
BUSINESS
October 2, 1996 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. space effort entered a new era Tuesday as McDonnell Douglas executives rolled open the doors of a huge new facility in Huntington Beach for assembling key components of the world's first orbiting space station. Completion of the five-story, 22,500-square-foot clean room--the largest dust-free manufacturing facility the company has ever built--"marks the transition" from design to actual production of U.S.
NEWS
July 13, 1996 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal space agency announced Friday that it has canceled the next scheduled launch of the space shuttle after discovering that flames had penetrated protective insulation on joints in the shuttle's solid-fuel rockets during the last launch. The cancellation means that astronaut Shannon Lucid must remain aboard the Russian space station Mir an additional six weeks. The shuttle Atlantis was to be launched July 31 to bring her home.
NEWS
August 13, 2001 | USHA LEE McFARLING, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
It is the closest planet to the sun. A roasting crisp of a world where daytime temperatures reach 800 degrees. And yet, stretched across the surface of Mercury are what look to be patches of ice. It's one of the biggest mysteries of this little planet--a bookend of the solar system and one of our nearest neighbors. While Mercury was visited briefly once, by Mariner 10 in the mid-1970s, less than half of the planet was seen by the spacecraft's cameras.
NEWS
May 21, 1996 | From Associated Press
Shimmering as it swayed in the orbital sunlight Monday 176 miles above Earth, an inflatable antenna swelled to the size of a tennis court and flew alongside space shuttle Endeavour. "Pretty fantastic," shuttle commander John Casper said. The experimental, silver-colored antenna appeared to expand to its full size after being released by the Endeavour astronauts--nearly 50 feet in diameter, supported by three inflatable struts 92 feet long.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1986 | MILES CORWIN and PETER H. KING, Times Staff Writers
Air Force officials and experts from the aerospace industry Monday began a secret investigation into the explosion of a Titan 34-D rocket above a launch pad here. "It's Air Force policy that all accident investigation boards are closed," said Larry Hannon, a spokesman at the Air Force Space Division in Los Angeles. "That's for planes or something like this."
WORLD
October 21, 2003 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
A Soyuz spaceship with a three-person crew, including two of the world's most experienced astronauts, docked successfully at the international space station Monday. With the American shuttle fleet grounded because of the February breakup of the space shuttle Columbia, the three-seat Russian Soyuz is the only means of ferrying crews to and from the orbiting station. A Soyuz is always attached to the station as an emergency escape vehicle.
NEWS
March 6, 1986 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
An international armada of spacecraft has begun its rendezvous with Halley's comet, giving scientists their closest view yet of the most fabled wanderer in the solar system. The first of five probes--the Soviet Union's Vega 1--passed within 6,000 miles of the comet's icy nucleus late Wednesday night, beginning what one astronomer calls "the greatest week cometary science has ever had."
BUSINESS
October 2, 1996 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. space effort entered a new era Tuesday as McDonnell Douglas officials rolled open the doors of a huge new facility for assembling key components of the world's first orbiting space station. Completion of the five-story, 22,500-square-foot clean room--the largest dust-free manufacturing facility the company has ever built--"marks the transition" from design to actual production of U.S.
NEWS
July 13, 1996 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal space agency announced Friday that it has canceled the next scheduled launch of the space shuttle after discovering that flames had penetrated protective insulation on joints in the shuttle's solid-fuel rockets during the last launch. The cancellation means that astronaut Shannon Lucid must remain aboard the Russian space station Mir an additional six weeks. The shuttle Atlantis was to be launched July 31 to bring her home.
NEWS
May 21, 1996 | From Associated Press
Shimmering as it swayed in the orbital sunlight Monday 176 miles above Earth, an inflatable antenna swelled to the size of a tennis court and flew alongside space shuttle Endeavour. "Pretty fantastic," shuttle commander John Casper said. The experimental, silver-colored antenna appeared to expand to its full size after being released by the Endeavour astronauts--nearly 50 feet in diameter, supported by three inflatable struts 92 feet long.
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