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NEWS
December 20, 1989 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush, taking two major steps toward improving relations with Beijing, cleared the way Tuesday for American-made satellites to be launched in China and for a continuation of loans from the U.S. Export-Import Bank to China. In both cases, the President overrode objections by Congress and invoked his personal authority to approve the transactions. The actions came less than two weeks after Brent Scowcroft, Bush's national security adviser, and Deputy Secretary of State Lawrence S.
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BUSINESS
April 29, 1998 | Elizabeth Douglass
Kistler Aerospace Corp. signed an agreement with the Australian government establishing a commercial space launch site in Woomera, South Australia. The operations agreement would allow Kistler to begin construction of a spaceport and start launch tests later this year. The privately owned company, which has headquarters in Los Angeles and Kirkland, Wash., still needs to complete its lease agreement and other approvals, and did not release terms of the deal.
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BUSINESS
August 23, 1990 | From Reuters
The White House on Wednesday conditionally approved U.S. participation in Australian plans for the world's first private spaceport, a project that relies on a mix of U.S. technology and Soviet rockets. Bruce Middleton of the Australian Space Office in Canberra said the authorization clears the way for Connecticut-based United Technologies Corp. to provide needed technical expertise.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1990 | WILSON DA SILVA, REUTERS
For satellite builders, it could be a dream come true--cheap but reliable Soviet rockets helped by American know-how launching satellites from near the Equator in a politically stable country. The Cape York Space Agency, the company planning the world's first private spaceport, expects to launch its first 4,850-pound commercial payload by 1995 from a marshland site on the northeastern tip of Australia.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1990 | WILSON DA SILVA, REUTERS
For satellite builders, it could be a dream come true--cheap but reliable Soviet rockets helped by American know-how launching satellites from near the Equator in a politically stable country. The Cape York Space Agency, the company planning the world's first private spaceport, expects to launch its first 4,850-pound commercial payload by 1995 from a marshland site on the northeastern tip of Australia.
BUSINESS
April 29, 1998 | Elizabeth Douglass
Kistler Aerospace Corp. signed an agreement with the Australian government establishing a commercial space launch site in Woomera, South Australia. The operations agreement would allow Kistler to begin construction of a spaceport and start launch tests later this year. The privately owned company, which has headquarters in Los Angeles and Kirkland, Wash., still needs to complete its lease agreement and other approvals, and did not release terms of the deal.
BUSINESS
September 10, 1988 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration said Friday that it is planning to allow China to launch an American-made commercial communications satellite next year, the first time the United States has permitted a non-Western government to handle a U.S.-made satellite. The decision, which is subject to approval by Congress, was designed to keep American satellite-makers competitive in the face of a series of U.S.
BUSINESS
August 23, 1990 | From Reuters
The White House on Wednesday conditionally approved U.S. participation in Australian plans for the world's first private spaceport, a project that relies on a mix of U.S. technology and Soviet rockets. Bruce Middleton of the Australian Space Office in Canberra said the authorization clears the way for Connecticut-based United Technologies Corp. to provide needed technical expertise.
NEWS
December 20, 1989 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush, taking two major steps toward improving relations with Beijing, cleared the way Tuesday for American-made satellites to be launched in China and for a continuation of loans from the U.S. Export-Import Bank to China. In both cases, the President overrode objections by Congress and invoked his personal authority to approve the transactions. The actions came less than two weeks after Brent Scowcroft, Bush's national security adviser, and Deputy Secretary of State Lawrence S.
BUSINESS
September 10, 1988 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration said Friday that it is planning to allow China to launch an American-made commercial communications satellite next year, the first time the United States has permitted a non-Western government to handle a U.S.-made satellite. The decision, which is subject to approval by Congress, was designed to keep American satellite-makers competitive in the face of a series of U.S.
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