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Space Programs China

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NEWS
January 29, 1995 | Reuters
A rain of flaming wreckage from a Chinese rocket that blew up during a satellite launch killed six people and injured 23, deepening China's trauma over its worst space disaster. The spectacular explosion at dawn Thursday already had cast a pall over China's biggest holiday, the lunar New Year festival that begins Tuesday, and shocked space officials hoping to snare a bigger slice of the world launch market.
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NEWS
June 4, 2001 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three years ago, Republicans in Congress launched a ferocious attack on President Clinton for approving the export of satellites to China in a way they said harmed America's security. Now, with a Republican in the White House and a satellite industry complaining of lost business, Washington is singing a different tune. Amid the furor of the late 1990s, the Republican Congress enacted legislation making it harder for companies to win government approval of satellite exports.
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NEWS
January 11, 2001 | From Associated Press
An unmanned Chinese spacecraft rocketed into orbit early Wednesday in the second test flight of a vessel intended to one day carry astronauts and make China the third nation capable of manned space travel. A Long March rocket blasted off from a Gobi Desert launch center at 1 a.m. and put the Shenzhou II spacecraft into orbit 10 minutes later, state media reported.
NEWS
January 11, 2001 | From Associated Press
An unmanned Chinese spacecraft rocketed into orbit early Wednesday in the second test flight of a vessel intended to one day carry astronauts and make China the third nation capable of manned space travel. A Long March rocket blasted off from a Gobi Desert launch center at 1 a.m. and put the Shenzhou II spacecraft into orbit 10 minutes later, state media reported.
NEWS
February 24, 2000 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Get ready for the taikonauts. At a secret training center somewhere in western Beijing, a handful of men hoping to become the first Chinese in space are learning how to deal with weightlessness, to combat claustrophobia and to navigate by starlight, as China makes its push to join the exclusive club of nations capable of sending humans into orbit.
BUSINESS
March 1, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hughes, China Reportedly Reach Launch Accord: The pact calls for the Optus B3, an Australian telecommunications satellite built by Hughes Aircraft Co., to be launched from China by one of China's Long March rockets in the second half of 1994, the Xinhua news agency reported. It would replace the Optus B2, another Hughes-built satellite that failed to reach orbit after launching from China in December, 1992. However, the Optus B3 launch will first require clearance by the U.S.
NEWS
April 8, 1992 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sign that China intends to develop great-power prestige in the coming decades, the government announced Tuesday that it plans to send astronauts into space by the year 2000. China will first develop the technology for a manned spacecraft and conduct practice launches with no astronauts aboard, the official New China News Agency reported, quoting a document released by the State Commission of Science and Technology. Then the manned flights will occur, the agency said.
NEWS
July 4, 1988
China announced it has developed a new, more powerful rocket in its successful Long March series and said it soon will launch a meteorological satellite into space. The new Long March 4 has the capability of putting a 2.5-ton payload into orbit, the official New China News Agency said.
NEWS
April 8, 1990 | From Associated Press
A Chinese rocket lifted a U.S.-made telecommunications satellite into space Saturday, marking the nation's debut in the international satellite-launching business. Applause broke out in the launch control room as the flaming tail of the Long March 3 rocket disappeared into the nighttime skies over the Xichang Satellite Center in southwest China's Sichuan province. Attending the launch were about 400 invited guests from around the world, including many from satellite maker Hughes Aircraft Co.
NEWS
January 29, 1987 | United Press International
China signed its first contract Wednesday to launch an American satellite, which originally was intended for launching by a space shuttle. The move is a direct result of the shuttle Challenger explosion on Jan. 28, 1986, and is a sign of increasing foreign competition to provide access to space, officials said. The contract with Teresat Inc.
NEWS
February 24, 2000 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Get ready for the taikonauts. At a secret training center somewhere in western Beijing, a handful of men hoping to become the first Chinese in space are learning how to deal with weightlessness, to combat claustrophobia and to navigate by starlight, as China makes its push to join the exclusive club of nations capable of sending humans into orbit.
NEWS
November 21, 1999 | From Associated Press
China today completed its first unmanned test of a spacecraft meant to carry astronauts, a breakthrough that could mean a manned mission is just months away. China is striving to become the third country, after the United States and the former Soviet Union, to send human beings into outer space. Its space program is a symbol of national strength in a mostly rural land where farmers make an average of $260 a year.
NEWS
July 19, 1998 | From Associated Press
China's satellite launch center lacked basic safety features and posed a constant danger to U.S. technicians and to thousands of peasants living nearby, according to newly declassified White House documents. The searing assessment of China's Xichang Satellite Launch Center was written by an engineer for the satellite consortium Intelsat, according to White House officials. Intelsat was using Chinese rockets to launch U.S.-built commercial satellites into orbit.
NEWS
May 25, 1998 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bernard L. Schwartz, a major Democratic campaign donor, said Sunday that he never sought special treatment from President Clinton for his satellite company now under investigation for possible unlawful assistance to China. "I've never sought favor nor gotten favor," said Schwartz, chairman and chief executive of Loral Space & Communications Ltd., on ABC-TV's "This Week."
NEWS
May 23, 1998 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton authorized a U.S. aerospace firm to launch a satellite in China earlier this year, despite warnings from the Justice Department that the move would jeopardize an ongoing investigation of the company, headed by a major Democratic donor, according to internal documents released Friday by the White House. National Security Advisor Samuel R. "Sandy" Berger said in a memo to the president on Feb.
NEWS
January 29, 1995 | Reuters
A rain of flaming wreckage from a Chinese rocket that blew up during a satellite launch killed six people and injured 23, deepening China's trauma over its worst space disaster. The spectacular explosion at dawn Thursday already had cast a pall over China's biggest holiday, the lunar New Year festival that begins Tuesday, and shocked space officials hoping to snare a bigger slice of the world launch market.
NEWS
March 18, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
China has won a bidding competition to launch a communications satellite for a consortium of eight Arab nations, the China News Service reported. It said the satellite will be launched aboard a Chinese rocket at the end of 1991 for the Arabian Satellite Communications Organization. Its members include Oman, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Morocco, Iraq, Syria and Jordan. China's first commercial launch is planned for next month.
NEWS
December 24, 1992 | Associated Press
The Los Angeles-based manufacturer of a telecommunications satellite says the Chinese-launched unit apparently exploded before reaching its final orbit. In a news release that reached Beijing today, Hughes Space and Communications Co. said engineers studying a video of Monday's launch of the Australian satellite saw a brief fireball "during the boost phase." Hughes said experts have not yet determined what caused the breakup.
BUSINESS
March 1, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hughes, China Reportedly Reach Launch Accord: The pact calls for the Optus B3, an Australian telecommunications satellite built by Hughes Aircraft Co., to be launched from China by one of China's Long March rockets in the second half of 1994, the Xinhua news agency reported. It would replace the Optus B2, another Hughes-built satellite that failed to reach orbit after launching from China in December, 1992. However, the Optus B3 launch will first require clearance by the U.S.
NEWS
December 24, 1992 | Associated Press
The Los Angeles-based manufacturer of a telecommunications satellite says the Chinese-launched unit apparently exploded before reaching its final orbit. In a news release that reached Beijing today, Hughes Space and Communications Co. said engineers studying a video of Monday's launch of the Australian satellite saw a brief fireball "during the boost phase." Hughes said experts have not yet determined what caused the breakup.
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