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BUSINESS
May 13, 1990 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One day last summer, in a government office in Brazil's capital city, European business people taught McDonnell Douglas Space Systems Co. a painful lesson in the competitive realities of the new commercial rocket industry. The Huntington Beach aerospace giant, which builds the Delta II rocket, was in a tough fight with Arianespace Inc. of France for a $100-million-plus contract to launch two Brazilian telecommunications satellites.
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NEWS
August 19, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Europe's Ariane rocket has successfully lobbed two satellites into orbit from its South American base--the first launch after a series of delays that have kept the booster rocket grounded since April. The Ariane 4 rocket, the second-most powerful in the series of unmanned European launchers, sent a Brazilian and an Egyptian satellite into space late Thursday from its base in Kourou, French Guiana.
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NEWS
November 21, 1990 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sometime after Christmas, but before the spring thaw, the small staff of an arcane White House agency will finish work on a document that will help chart the future of America's beleaguered commercial space industry. The National Space Council, which was activated two years ago by President Bush to set goals for space exploration and development, is drafting a comprehensive policy that will seek to improve the fortunes of the faltering $1-billion-a-year commercial space industry.
NEWS
November 3, 1992
Europe's ambitious answer to the U.S. space shuttle program--the Hermes space plane--faces a possible early demise when ministers from the 13-nation European Space Agency (ESA) meet next Monday and Tuesday in this Spanish city amid technological delays and budget problems that have put the project in limbo. Under a budget to be presented at the Granada meeting by ESA Director-General Jean-Marie Luton, work on the project is expected to be limited to continued studies on related technologies.
NEWS
July 22, 1988
The Western European space rocket Ariane-3 successfully launched into orbit two satellites about 20 minutes after blasting off from its base in French Guiana, said officials from Arianespace, the firm responsible for commercial flights of European rockets. The launch, which was monitored at the French Space Research Center in Paris, was the fourth faultless flight this year. The first satellite to be ejected from the Ariane's launching system belongs to the Indian Space Research Organization.
NEWS
March 19, 1988 | From Reuters
The European Space Agency said Friday that it has approved an accord with NASA to build an international space station in the largest international civil space venture ever undertaken. The accord, which follows two years of negotiations between the agency and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, was adopted at a meeting here, the agency said in a statement. The agreement clears the way for development to start on the $20-billion project.
NEWS
November 26, 1988 | Associated Press
Europe and the United States hope to send a space probe to Titan, the solar system's biggest moon and the only one with an atmosphere believed to be much like primordial Earth's, the European Space Agency announced Friday. The joint mission to Saturn's immense, gas-shrouded moon would begin in 1996 and include a probe that may be able to test the moon's soil.
NEWS
August 9, 1989 | From United Press International
A French-built Ariane 4 rocket roared into space Tuesday and deployed a communications satellite and a star mapper, officials said. The liquid-fueled rocket, the most powerful launcher in the European inventory, streaked away from the European Space Agency's jungle launch complex on the northern coast of South America about 10 hours after the U.S. space shuttle Columbia lifted off in Florida.
NEWS
July 5, 1989 | From Reuters
The launch of an Ariane-3 space rocket, halted seconds before blastoff last Friday, has been rescheduled for next Tuesday, the Arianespace consortium said Tuesday. The rocket will place in orbit the European Space Agency's Olympus 1 satellite, which will transmit Italian and British television signals.
NEWS
September 26, 1992 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A new era of Mars exploration began Friday when a Titan III rocket lofted the Mars Observer into space in the first of a planned series of ambitious missions by the United States, Russia and Europe over the next decade. The booster lifted off at 10:05 a.m. PDT, about 30 minutes behind schedule, into the hazy skies above Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.
NEWS
August 20, 1992 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
In mid-September, NASA will launch a satellite that, finances permitting, will kick off a decade of Mars exploration by the United States, Russia, Europe and Japan. The ambitious string of missions, discussed Wednesday at a NASA briefing, aims to settle some big questions: Was there ever life on Mars? Is water there now? What are the weather cycles?
NEWS
December 8, 1991 | Associated Press
An Atlas rocket thundered into space Saturday with a European communications satellite that will relay television broadcasts of the 1992 Olympics. It was the first commercial launch for General Dynamics Corp. since April, when one of its boosters careened out of control and had to be destroyed shortly after liftoff. The $85-million satellite, owned by the European Telecommunications Satellite Organization, joins six other Eutelsat craft in orbit.
NEWS
January 12, 1991 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The character of space exploration is changing dramatically as nations with major programs grapple with rising costs and shrinking budgets. And it seems likely that some past alliances will fall apart and the military will play an expanding role in the use of space, experts from around the world said here this week. For example, the Soviet Union has severely curtailed its space program, and Europeans are growing increasingly uneasy with their cooperative ventures with the United States.
NEWS
November 21, 1990 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sometime after Christmas, but before the spring thaw, the small staff of an arcane White House agency will finish work on a document that will help chart the future of America's beleaguered commercial space industry. The National Space Council, which was activated two years ago by President Bush to set goals for space exploration and development, is drafting a comprehensive policy that will seek to improve the fortunes of the faltering $1-billion-a-year commercial space industry.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1990 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One day last summer, in a government office in Brazil's capital city, European businessmen taught McDonnell Douglas Space Systems Co. a painful lesson in the competitive realities of the new commercial rocket industry. The Huntington Beach aerospace giant, which builds the Delta II rocket, was in a tough fight with Arianespace Inc. of France for a $100-million-plus contract to launch two Brazilian telecommunications satellites.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1990 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One day last summer, in a government office in Brazil's capital city, European business people taught McDonnell Douglas Space Systems Co. a painful lesson in the competitive realities of the new commercial rocket industry. The Huntington Beach aerospace giant, which builds the Delta II rocket, was in a tough fight with Arianespace Inc. of France for a $100-million-plus contract to launch two Brazilian telecommunications satellites.
NEWS
August 9, 1989 | From United Press International
A French-built Ariane 4 rocket roared into space Tuesday and deployed a communications satellite and a star mapper, officials said. The liquid-fueled rocket, the most powerful launcher in the European inventory, streaked away from the European Space Agency's jungle launch complex on the northern coast of South America about 10 hours after the U.S. space shuttle Columbia lifted off in Florida.
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