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NEWS
March 3, 1989 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Landsat, the private U.S. satellite system that provides photographs of Earth for government and private industry, may shut down this month because the government has cut off funding. The system, owned by a joint venture of Hughes Aircraft and General Electric, operates two satellites in low Earth orbit and markets the photographs to a variety of customers, such as major oil exploration firms and environmental agencies. "This is beyond belief," Peter M. P.
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NEWS
September 15, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The House approved $28.7 billion in spending for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration over the next two years. The legislation, passed on a 399-17 vote, also sets a cap on development costs for the international space station. The measure moves to renegotiate the space station agreement so that benefits to the 16 participating nations are more in line with actual contributions and so the U.S. shares less of the future operating costs.
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NEWS
September 15, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The House approved $28.7 billion in spending for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration over the next two years. The legislation, passed on a 399-17 vote, also sets a cap on development costs for the international space station. The measure moves to renegotiate the space station agreement so that benefits to the 16 participating nations are more in line with actual contributions and so the U.S. shares less of the future operating costs.
NEWS
July 23, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
NASA's international space station received another stamp of approval--this time from the Senate, which voted to allocate $2.1 billion for the station in 1998. The House appropriated the same amount last week for the station, which supports more than 1,000 jobs in Orange County. Part of the station, which is expected to take flight in 2002, is being built at the McDonnell Douglas plant in Huntington Beach. It will be an orbiting research lab funded by 14 nations--including the U.S.
NEWS
September 23, 1992 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
House and Senate negotiators agreed Tuesday to spend $2.1 billion next year to continue building the controversial Space Station Freedom, scheduled for launch in late 1995. Although the compromise figure is $125 million less than what was sought by the Bush Administration, officials of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration said the accord will permit work on the station to proceed on schedule.
NEWS
September 12, 1988 | JOSH GETLIN, Times Staff Writer
National Aeronautics and Space Administration officials and agency critics expressed the belief Sunday that the safety of the space shuttle program has been greatly improved and said "man-made risks" threaten the space program less now than when the shuttle blew up in 1986. Space agency officials cautioned, however, that there might be several delays before the next launch takes place, probably some time later this month.
NEWS
April 29, 1992 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congressional critics of NASA's plan to launch a $30-billion space laboratory into Earth orbit by the end of the decade will mount today the most spirited attack yet on the controversial project when the House debates a funding plan for the space agency. Led by Rep. Tim Roemer (D-Ind.), opponents of Space Station Freedom say they will try to strip from the 1993 federal budget virtually all of the $2.
NEWS
May 31, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The House beat back attempts to stop or reduce funding for the orbiting science lab program, scheduled to be launched in late 1997, authorizing $1.8 billion for the station on a 286-127 vote. The station is part of a larger $19.7-billion measure covering a panoply of civilian science projects that was passed later Thursday night on a voice vote. Rep. Tim Roemer (D-Ind.) tried and failed to reduce the station's budget by 3%.
NEWS
July 23, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
NASA's international space station received another stamp of approval--this time from the Senate, which voted to allocate $2.1 billion for the station in 1998. The House appropriated the same amount last week for the station, which supports more than 1,000 jobs in Orange County. Part of the station, which is expected to take flight in 2002, is being built at the McDonnell Douglas plant in Huntington Beach. It will be an orbiting research lab funded by 14 nations--including the U.S.
NEWS
December 10, 1992 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warning that America's aviation industry is in a "nose-dive," NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin called on the Clinton Administration on Wednesday to invest billions of dollars in aeronautics research to stave off potentially devastating foreign competition. "The whole aviation system is in crisis and crisis is the right word for it," Goldin told members of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics at a meeting in suburban Virginia.
NEWS
May 31, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The House beat back attempts to stop or reduce funding for the orbiting science lab program, scheduled to be launched in late 1997, authorizing $1.8 billion for the station on a 286-127 vote. The station is part of a larger $19.7-billion measure covering a panoply of civilian science projects that was passed later Thursday night on a voice vote. Rep. Tim Roemer (D-Ind.) tried and failed to reduce the station's budget by 3%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1995 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After years of near-death experiences in federal budget battles, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's space station won a promise of survival Wednesday when a House subcommittee authorized all funds needed to complete the station by 2002. The bill to authorize $13.
NEWS
December 10, 1992 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warning that America's aviation industry is in a "nose-dive," NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin called on the Clinton Administration on Wednesday to invest billions of dollars in aeronautics research to stave off potentially devastating foreign competition. "The whole aviation system is in crisis and crisis is the right word for it," Goldin told members of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics at a meeting in suburban Virginia.
NEWS
September 23, 1992 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
House and Senate negotiators agreed Tuesday to spend $2.1 billion next year to continue building the controversial Space Station Freedom, scheduled for launch in late 1995. Although the compromise figure is $125 million less than what was sought by the Bush Administration, officials of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration said the accord will permit work on the station to proceed on schedule.
NEWS
September 23, 1992 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
House and Senate negotiators agreed Tuesday to spend $2.1 billion next year to continue building the controversial space station Freedom, scheduled for launch beginning in late 1995. Although the compromise figure is $125 million less than sought by the Bush Administration, officials of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration said the accord will permit work on the station to proceed on schedule.
NEWS
April 29, 1992 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congressional critics of NASA's plan to launch a $30-billion space laboratory into Earth orbit by the end of the decade will mount today the most spirited attack yet on the controversial project when the House debates a funding plan for the space agency. Led by Rep. Tim Roemer (D-Ind.), opponents of Space Station Freedom say they will try to strip from the 1993 federal budget virtually all of the $2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1995 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After years of near-death experiences in federal budget battles, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's space station won a promise of survival Wednesday when a House subcommittee authorized all funds needed to complete the station by 2002. The bill to authorize $13.
NEWS
September 6, 1988 | ROBERT A. JONES, Times Staff Writer
The scheduled launch this fall of the space shuttle Discovery will signal the re-emergence of this country's manned space program after a 32-month hiatus. But the return of the shuttle also will confront the nation with a host of difficult questions about America's commitment to the next stages of space exploration.
NEWS
April 29, 1992 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congressional critics of the nation's plan to launch a $30-billion space laboratory into Earth orbit by the end of the decade will mount the most spirited attack yet on the controversial project today when the House debates funding for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Led by Rep. Tim Roemer (D-Ind.), opponents of Space Station Freedom said they will try to strip from the 1993 federal budget virtually all of the $2.25 billion requested for the project by NASA.
NEWS
June 5, 1991 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the past 17 years, the federal government has spent $1.5 billion to finance construction of a huge telescope in space in order to provide scientists with unprecedentedly clear photos. Last year, it was launched--only to contain a badly flawed mirror. The superconducting super collider, an $11-billion project that would allow physicists to study the fundamental building blocks of the universe, is in danger of going broke for lack of contributions from international partners.
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