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Space Programs Finances

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NEWS
March 3, 1993 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
NASA's controversial space station program developed potential cost overruns of more than $1 billion because of management failings by NASA and private contractors--including McDonnell Douglas in Huntington Beach, government officials said Tuesday. They also said continuing efforts to redesign the $31-billion project have contributed to potential cost overruns.
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NEWS
September 22, 2000 | USHA LEE McFARLING, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Citing ballooning costs, NASA officials have ordered an immediate work stoppage on a major mission at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, postponing for at least several years the world's first voyage to Pluto. The nearly $500-million Pluto-Kuiper Express mission had been scheduled to launch in December 2004 and reach Pluto by 2012.
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NEWS
July 1, 1993 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Days after the Clinton Administration's scaled-back space station plan survived a bruising attack in the House, a new dispute over the station's future is brewing inside the polished headquarters of the space agency. At stake are control of the $25-billion program, billions of dollars in space station contracts and the future of hundreds of Southern California aerospace workers assigned to the project.
NEWS
April 9, 2000 | MARCIA DUNN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
NASA's space station warranty ran out last month, and the agency is no closer to finishing the project than it was when the first two pieces rocketed into orbit in 1998. After almost 500 days aloft, the international space station has no occupants, no experiments, no firm assembly plans. Instead, it's a barren two-roomer with bad batteries, noisy equipment and poor ventilation.
NEWS
July 30, 1992 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Turning back a determined effort to ground the planned space station Freedom, the House on Wednesday voted decisively to continue construction of the controversial $30-billion project. "I think this is a victory for America's future," said an ebullient Daniel S. Goldin, the new administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. "I'm very proud of the Congress of the United States."
NEWS
August 3, 1993 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
An unmanned Titan IV rocket carrying a top-secret spy satellite exploded Monday moments after launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base in what civilian space experts said may be the most expensive U.S. space accident since the Challenger disaster. "Between the cost of the spacecraft and the cost of the satellite, this was a $2-billion accident," said John Pike, director of the space policy project at the Federation of American Scientists in Washington.
NEWS
December 9, 1999 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton defended the U.S. space program Wednesday in the wake of the Mars Polar Lander mishap, and key lawmakers said Congress is unlikely to cut space funding, despite growing criticism about the loss of the $165-million craft.
NEWS
May 26, 1999 | Associated Press
Russia's Mir space station will stay up until next year and possibly longer if the program manages to land private funding, Russian Space Agency official Boris Ostroumov said Tuesday.
NEWS
December 13, 1996 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A White House-commissioned safety study of the nation's space shuttles, due for release next week, has concluded that budget cuts, work-force reductions and the fleet's advancing age have not demonstrably increased the risk of accidents.
NEWS
August 4, 1994 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate on Wednesday overwhelmingly rejected efforts to kill the space station, removing the final legislative hurdle of the year for the $17.4-billion project and providing more stability than it has had in a decade. "The thing that our contractors and employees tell us we need more than anything else is stability," National Aeronautics and Space Administration chief Daniel S. Goldin said in an interview. "We now have it."
NEWS
December 9, 1999 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton defended the U.S. space program Wednesday in the wake of the Mars Polar Lander mishap, and key lawmakers said Congress is unlikely to cut space funding, despite growing criticism about the loss of the $165-million craft.
NEWS
May 26, 1999 | Associated Press
Russia's Mir space station will stay up until next year and possibly longer if the program manages to land private funding, Russian Space Agency official Boris Ostroumov said Tuesday.
NEWS
November 7, 1998 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
America's space program hasn't soared this high in nearly 30 years. With John Glenn circling the planet aboard the shuttle Discovery, public enthusiasm over the 77-year-old astronaut's historic flight has NASA officials nearly in orbit themselves. "Nobody expected the magnitude of the public interest and press coverage we got," Joe Rothenberg, chief of NASA's office of spaceflight, said of last week's launch.
NEWS
February 15, 1998 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
NASA has quietly acknowledged that the international space station will cost $3.6 billion more than the original $17.4-billion cost cap established by Congress in 1993. The massive cost overrun was included without notice in budget documents presented to Congress recently by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and NASA officials confirmed it in interviews last week.
NEWS
February 25, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Construction of the international space station, scheduled to begin with a Russian flight in November, could be delayed once again because the Russian space program is broke. The Russians had said previously they were eight months behind on a service module that was scheduled to be launched in April 1998. But statements made in Moscow by Yuri Koptev, head of the Russian Space Agency, indicated the Russians may not be able to meet their date for launch of a guidance and control module.
NEWS
February 7, 1997 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Reflecting a deepening crisis in the International Space Station program, NASA is making a highly unusual $20-million emergency loan to cash-starved Russian aerospace concerns that are eight months behind schedule in building a key component, NASA chief Daniel S. Goldin disclosed Thursday. NASA's loan comes amid increasing concern that Russia's problems could jeopardize the entire international project.
NEWS
June 25, 1992 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his most spirited defense yet of the nation's manned space program, new NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin on Wednesday launched a high-stakes campaign to save the threatened Space Station Freedom from the congressional budget ax. "Space is no longer just an experiment or a symbol," he told more than 100 leaders of the aerospace industry at a meeting in suburban Virginia. "Space is an essential part of America's future in medicine, science and technology."
NEWS
April 24, 1992 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Sporting red lapel buttons that protest an early end to their spacecraft's mission, scientists Wednesday unveiled the latest results from the Magellan probe orbiting Venus, including three-dimensional images of Venusian mountains and new details about the approximately 1,500 volcanoes that riddle the planet's surface. The financially strapped National Aeronautics and Space Administration has decided to turn off Magellan's instruments two years early to save about $50 million.
NEWS
December 13, 1996 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A White House-commissioned safety study of the nation's space shuttles, due for release next week, has concluded that budget cuts, work-force reductions and the fleet's advancing age have not demonstrably increased the risk of accidents.
NEWS
December 27, 1995 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Russian proposal to redesign the international space station would cause up to a one-year construction delay and boost the project's cost by as much as $2 billion, according to a space agency analysis provided to Congress. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration also unveiled to congressional leaders a contingency plan, should Russia drop out of the space station program, that would require U.S. contractors to supply alternative hardware at an estimated $500-million cost to U.S.
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