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Space Programs Japan

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BUSINESS
February 7, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Japan's first domestically designed major rocket roared into space Friday, it marked a great leap upward for the country's aerospace industry. What that leap will ultimately bring, however, remains mostly a mystery even to the people who built and launched the H-II rocket. An expanded role for Japan in space research is a virtual certainty. A strong foray into the commercial satellite launch business is a possibility but by no means guaranteed.
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NEWS
December 9, 1999 | Associated Press
Japan announced today that it will halt development of the troubled H-2 rocket--considered the key to Japan's space program--after two failed launches this year. The Sankei newspaper called the Science and Technology Agency's decision a huge setback to Japan's space program, which is competing with Europe and the U.S. for a share of commercial satellite launches. Japan has been plagued over the past few years by bureaucratic wrangling, cost overruns and technical difficulties.
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NEWS
December 9, 1999 | Associated Press
Japan announced today that it will halt development of the troubled H-2 rocket--considered the key to Japan's space program--after two failed launches this year. The Sankei newspaper called the Science and Technology Agency's decision a huge setback to Japan's space program, which is competing with Europe and the U.S. for a share of commercial satellite launches. Japan has been plagued over the past few years by bureaucratic wrangling, cost overruns and technical difficulties.
NEWS
November 16, 1999 | Associated Press
Japan's ambitions to become a world leader in aerospace technology were dealt a major setback Monday when engine trouble forced officials to blow up a rocket carrying a $95-million satellite just minutes after launch. It was the second time this year that problems with the H-2 rocket, the key to Japan's satellite program, failed to put the MTSAT satellite into orbit. Another H-2 rocket failed to get its payload into orbit in February.
NEWS
January 14, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
A Japanese astronaut sent into orbit aboard the space shuttle Endeavour retrieved his country's science satellite Saturday after its wayward wings were clipped. Koichi Wakata used the shuttle's robot arm to haul the gleaming, 4-ton satellite--minus its two solar-panel wings--into the shuttle's cargo bay. "Koichi's got it, Houston," shuttle commander Brian Duffy said. "Congratulations on a great grab," a Houston ground controller told Endeavour's crew.
BUSINESS
November 25, 1996 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A prototype of a Japanese space shuttle, suspended by cables from a helicopter, was lifted high above a desert landing strip in southern Australia last July, then released to glide smoothly to Earth. Test landings of ALFLEX--the "automatic landing flight experiment plane"--continued for several weeks, each time with the 20-foot, 1,700-pound craft safely landed by a computer and satellite signals.
BUSINESS
August 22, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Launch of Rocket Aborted: The launch of Japan's second H-2 rocket was aborted seconds before liftoff, according to a spokeswoman for the Japanese National Space Development Agency. The main engine ignited six seconds before it was to lift off Thursday, but its solid-fuel boosters failed to ignite, said agency spokeswoman Akiko Suzuki. The rockets' failure is being investigated. A new launch date has yet to be determined, she said.
BUSINESS
June 19, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Japan Space Agency Plans Shuttle: It plans to start developing an unmanned shuttle craft next year that will ferry supplies to and from the U.S.-led space station Freedom early in the next century, the National Space Development Agency of Japan announced. It will submit its proposals Thursday to the Science and Technology Agency, the first of several steps toward obtaining the several billion dollars needed before the craft flies.
NEWS
December 18, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
Engineers at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station adjacent to the Kennedy Space Center made final preparations for the twice-delayed maiden launch of a Titan 3 rocket tonight, the most powerful commercially developed booster built by an American company. The launch will mark the entry of Martin Marietta into the business of commercial launches. The 155-foot booster is scheduled to lift off at 7:20 p.m.
NEWS
March 7, 1989
A French Ariane 4 rocket boosted Japan's first commercial communications satellite into orbit along with a new European meteorological satellite in the European Space Agency's 29th launching. Running six days late because of a strike and mechanical problems, the 195-foot Ariane 4, making only its third flight, vaulted away from the space agency's launch complex at Kourou, French Guiana, on the northern coast of South America at 3:29 p.m. PST.
NEWS
July 4, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Japan successfully launched its first interplanetary probe to Mars on a mission that hopes to gather further evidence on whether the Red Planet could once have been warm enough to support life. The launch of the probe, known as Planet-B, by Japan's most powerful rocket takes the country into an elite space club; only the United States and Russia have previously sent out interplanetary spacecraft.
BUSINESS
November 25, 1996 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A prototype of a Japanese space shuttle, suspended by cables from a helicopter, was lifted high above a desert landing strip in southern Australia last July, then released to glide smoothly to Earth. Test landings of ALFLEX--the "automatic landing flight experiment plane"--continued for several weeks, each time with the 20-foot, 1,700-pound craft safely landed by a computer and satellite signals.
NEWS
January 14, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
A Japanese astronaut sent into orbit aboard the space shuttle Endeavour retrieved his country's science satellite Saturday after its wayward wings were clipped. Koichi Wakata used the shuttle's robot arm to haul the gleaming, 4-ton satellite--minus its two solar-panel wings--into the shuttle's cargo bay. "Koichi's got it, Houston," shuttle commander Brian Duffy said. "Congratulations on a great grab," a Houston ground controller told Endeavour's crew.
BUSINESS
August 22, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Launch of Rocket Aborted: The launch of Japan's second H-2 rocket was aborted seconds before liftoff, according to a spokeswoman for the Japanese National Space Development Agency. The main engine ignited six seconds before it was to lift off Thursday, but its solid-fuel boosters failed to ignite, said agency spokeswoman Akiko Suzuki. The rockets' failure is being investigated. A new launch date has yet to be determined, she said.
BUSINESS
February 7, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Japan's first domestically designed major rocket roared into space Friday, it marked a great leap upward for the country's aerospace industry. What that leap will ultimately bring, however, remains mostly a mystery even to the people who built and launched the H-II rocket. An expanded role for Japan in space research is a virtual certainty. A strong foray into the commercial satellite launch business is a possibility but by no means guaranteed.
BUSINESS
December 27, 1993 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese space agency officials say they are only weeks away from launching a new rocket, designed entirely with Japanese technology, that will put this country into the commercial satellite launching business. The H-II rocket, capable of putting a two-ton payload into the kind of high geostationary orbit used for communications satellites, is scheduled to blast off from Tanegashima Space Center on Feb. 1, weather permitting.
NEWS
September 26, 1989 | From Associated Press
Trade disputes between the United States and Japan should not stand in the way of greater cooperation in space programs, Vice President Dan Quayle said Monday. Quayle and Japanese Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu agreed that their nations will work together on a project to measure the effects of solar radiation on the Earth's magnetic field.
NEWS
December 27, 1987 | Associated Press
Japan has postponed a rocket launch after discovering that U.S.-made semiconductors in the electronic circuitry are defective, an official said today. Mikihisa Hagihara, a spokesman for Japan's National Space Development Agency, said flaws in special integrated circuits made by National Semiconductor of the United States have forced postponement of the Feb. 1 launch of an H1 rocket. A check of spare integrated circuits of the same type showed that about 10% had similar flaws, Hagihara said.
NEWS
April 14, 1993 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa, who will face a host of trade complaints when he meets President Clinton on Friday, will also be bearing a grievance. A recent American decision made "unilaterally and without consultation with Japan" to slash the U.S. budget for a space station project has displeased the Japanese, and Miyazawa may bring up the issue in Washington, Junji Yoshihara, director of the Japanese space agency's office of space utilization, said Tuesday.
NEWS
September 21, 1992 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After making an extra orbit to allow the weather to clear, the space shuttle Endeavour landed back at Florida's Kennedy Space Center on Sunday, concluding an eight-day mission devoted to more than 40 scientific experiments and already hailed as "overwhelmingly successful." Minutes after the orbiter's seven-member crew stepped down to a red-carpet welcome, technicians climbed aboard the spacecraft to collect a host of test subjects and materials for American and Japanese scientists.
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